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Using Golden Ratio

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Forum topic by rwe2156 posted 01-12-2016 02:04 PM 616 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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rwe2156

2198 posts in 945 days


01-12-2016 02:04 PM

How do you actually do the calculations?

The only “knowns” I have are the total height of drawers + dividers will be 35” and the top row will be 3” high.
The drawers will be inset and the dividers will be 3/4”.
The bottom two rows would be equal in height around 7”.

If I do the math I come up with 3, 4 7/8, 7 7/8, 12 3/4 obviously not gonna work.
I’ll come up with some pleasing dims, but just curious about this.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!


8 replies so far

View jumbojack's profile

jumbojack

1667 posts in 2089 days


#1 posted 01-12-2016 02:33 PM

Don’t get too caught up in the ratios. While the ratio is in most cases a good place to start, adjust for function. Your over all project can be determined by the ratio, but strict adherence is as you have found is not likely on all of the parts of a project.
1.6

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

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hotbyte

842 posts in 2440 days


#2 posted 01-12-2016 03:34 PM

It’s like Mr. Gibbs explained to Capt Jack Sparrow, they are more actual guidelines than rules :-)

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pintodeluxe

4858 posts in 2278 days


#3 posted 01-12-2016 04:43 PM

I wouldn’t even worry about golden ratio for drawer front sizes, just for the entire bank of drawers. Just make it generally rectangular in a manner that is pleasing to the eye. Also consider the style of furniture you are emulating. Arts and crafts, modern, Victorian, Federal etc will dictate shapes more than the golden ratio.

The math is just short side x 1.6 = the long side.

I often think about it when building wide doors. For example when cabinet doors are wider than they are tall, they don’t look right with the arts and crafts furniture I build. So I divide the door panel with another stile, which yields two vertical rectangles.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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SirIrb

1239 posts in 695 days


#4 posted 01-12-2016 05:43 PM

I would pitch the golden ratio and check this out.
http://lumberjocks.com/reviews/4794

I know, i know, the golden ration is_. [Fill in the blank with any Divine word]

Basically the book linked above makes better cases for ratios to use.

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

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Bill White

4456 posts in 3425 days


#5 posted 01-12-2016 06:33 PM

Though I have made a GR guide, I don’t follow it as an absolute.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7923 posts in 1845 days


#6 posted 01-12-2016 10:59 PM



How do you actually do the calculations?

The only “knowns” I have are the total height of drawers + dividers will be 35” and the top row will be 3” high.
The drawers will be inset and the dividers will be 3/4”.
The bottom two rows would be equal in height around 7”.

If I do the math I come up with 3, 4 7/8, 7 7/8, 12 3/4 obviously not gonna work.
I ll come up with some pleasing dims, but just curious about this.

- rwe2156

Don’t worry about applying phi to small individual pieces, start with the larger design and work down to the details. You can also use thirds or fifths as design ratios. If you are making a dresser, divide the overall piece into vertical sections, then you may, if you choose, subdivide each section horizontally. The important thing is balance. Beware of using halves, the eye will notice discrepancies quicker than with odd numbered ratios. You can use halves, but don’t overdue it.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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AandCstyle

2572 posts in 1722 days


#7 posted 01-12-2016 11:36 PM

rwe, you might find this link helpful.

-- Art

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2198 posts in 945 days


#8 posted 01-13-2016 12:47 PM

Art -thanks this is what I need!

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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