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Forum topic by Gixxerjoe04 posted 01-11-2016 09:32 PM 631 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Gixxerjoe04

835 posts in 1042 days


01-11-2016 09:32 PM

So I’ve got a project I need to get started as soon as possible, was going to start milling the wood this past weekend but decided to check the moisture, which I normally don’t do since I only buy kiln dried wood. Anyways, I picked up the wood 2 weeks ago from the mill and it’s moisture is at 10-12%, which I wasn’t expecting. It’s white oak, I’m making benches for my friends gym to go in his locker rooms and I planned on using flooring finish to protect against water and abuse. What are your alls opinions to do? Work with it the way it is, bring it inside and put a fan on it, maybe the warm air inside will help bring the moisture down? It’s stored at the mill in a metal building that doesn’t look to be insulated, and basically the same for my garage/shop. I’m in Kentucky, so we have weather across the spectrum.


16 replies so far

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Richforever

755 posts in 3186 days


#1 posted 01-11-2016 10:31 PM

I’d bring it inside; put sticks under and between the boards; let them dry for two weeks. This is what I do, and what I’ve read in books. It seems to work fine.

-- Rich, Seattle, WA

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2198 posts in 946 days


#2 posted 01-11-2016 11:18 PM

I’m thinking they’re going to be in a moist environment, so should be ok.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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Gixxerjoe04

835 posts in 1042 days


#3 posted 01-12-2016 12:19 AM

Was torn between both your answers before I posted this thread haha. I brought it inside, stickered it and put a fan on it, figure I’ll just keep it inside for a couple days and just go for it I guess. Really need to get it done, just don’t want it to mess up down the road. Now hopefully we can just get a warm day so I can work on it.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115202 posts in 3043 days


#4 posted 01-12-2016 12:23 AM

Be careful using the fan on the wood if you dry out one side of the wood more than the other you’re asking for cupping and twisting.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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Gixxerjoe04

835 posts in 1042 days


#5 posted 01-12-2016 12:30 AM

I’ve got 1/2” plywood strips as my stickers, so bad idea for the fan?

View TinWhiskers's profile

TinWhiskers

179 posts in 418 days


#6 posted 01-12-2016 12:33 AM

I had a 2’’ thick poplar slab at 12% moisture I made a bench out of . I knew I was rushing it. Just getting into slab wood and I couldn’t wait. Moved it to its permanent home. After a mo. it has twisted a tad. For now a shim takes care of it.

It may be good if you can wait a bit.

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Gixxerjoe04

835 posts in 1042 days


#7 posted 01-12-2016 12:41 AM

One thing I will be doing since they’ll be in a locker room is adding adjustable rubber feet to get the end grain off the potential wet ground and just so it can’t scoot easily. Was thinking, if it were to twist a little, could just adjust the feet to level it out. Gotta find the feet though, know what I want/need but not sure where to get them haha.

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fuigb

404 posts in 2423 days


#8 posted 01-12-2016 12:53 AM

Top piece already looks to be cupped. Or is that an illusion?

-- - Crud. Go tell your mother that I need a Band-aid.

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TinWhiskers

179 posts in 418 days


#9 posted 01-12-2016 12:56 AM

I think I see feet in that stack. :o)

I may go with adjustable feet once it is good and dry.

Looks cupped to me too.

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Gixxerjoe04

835 posts in 1042 days


#10 posted 01-12-2016 12:58 AM

It is, but it’ll be cut down quite a bit, so not worried about it

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2156 days


#11 posted 01-12-2016 03:17 AM

I would not blow that fan directly on that stack. I use a fan to constantly circulate the air in my drying barns but don’t blow it at the stacks. That said, I wouldn’t hesitate to build your bench with 10-12% MC white oak.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

4859 posts in 2279 days


#12 posted 01-12-2016 03:40 AM

Nothing wrong with using a fan. Three things dry lumber…
1. High heat. Space heater etc if you have a good spot to set up a kiln.
2. Low humidity. Household dehumidifier.
3. Air circulation. Stickers and fans.

It usually takes me 2 weeks to dry 5/4 white oak in an enclosed kiln at 100 degrees or more. I start with air dried lumber at 15% MC, and my goal is 6-8%.
If your lumber is truly at 12% core moisture content, measured with a reliable meter you probably need 3-4 weeks in an air conditioned/heated house to get to 6-8% core moisture. Make a fresh cut and measure the end grain. If you are seeing 14-15% it will take a little longer to dry.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

692 posts in 1264 days


#13 posted 01-12-2016 03:58 AM

Geez guys it’s just a bench. its probably not going to have raised panels or breadboard ends.Your wood is plenty dry.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115202 posts in 3043 days


#14 posted 01-12-2016 02:37 PM

pintodeluxe Has it laid out pretty well ,but I would still not have the fan blowing right on the wood. A dehumidifier should help too.There are lots of low-cost ones that will do the job.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2156 days


#15 posted 01-12-2016 02:47 PM



Geez guys it s just a bench. its probably not going to have raised panels or breadboard ends.Your wood is plenty dry.

- Aj2

Amen !

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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