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What is this blade used for?

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Forum topic by Harry posted 01-11-2016 03:12 AM 995 views 0 times favorited 23 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Harry

71 posts in 642 days


01-11-2016 03:12 AM

This blade came with a used Unisaw I got and don’t know what it is used for. 10” – 3/8 kerf.

-- Harry - Professional amateur


23 replies so far

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tomsteve

394 posts in 681 days


#1 posted 01-11-2016 03:15 AM

i believe its used for making big pieces of wood smaller. :)

dont think ive seen a grind like that on a blade before.

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MrUnix

4216 posts in 1661 days


#2 posted 01-11-2016 03:23 AM

V-groove cutter – typically used for scoring and folding stock.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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jbay

812 posts in 361 days


#3 posted 01-11-2016 03:53 AM

I believe it’s more just for decorative v-grooving material. Typically folding cutters don’t have the flattened tip.

CBW though

-- My “MO” involves Judging others, playing God, acting as LJs law enforcement, and never admitting any of my ideas could possibly be wrong or anyone else's idea could possibly be correct -- (A1Jim)

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Harry

71 posts in 642 days


#4 posted 01-11-2016 03:54 AM



i believe its used for making big pieces of wood smaller. :)

- tomsteve

You gave me a good chuckle.

-- Harry - Professional amateur

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MrUnix

4216 posts in 1661 days


#5 posted 01-11-2016 04:03 AM

I believe it s more just for decorative v-grooving material. Typically folding cutters don t have the flattened tip.
- jbay

Some do, some don’t… depends on the application.
V-Groove Cutter with 1/32 inch Flat Tip

Can also be used for decorative trim cuts as well.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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Harry

71 posts in 642 days


#6 posted 01-11-2016 04:10 AM


V-groove cutter – typically used for scoring and folding stock.

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

Cheers,
Brad

That makes sense Brad, It also came with a half dozen non-ferrous blades. The guy I bought the saw from (and a whole bunch of other tools) was an architect building a mega modern spec house with some materials I had never seen before.

-- Harry - Professional amateur

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MadMark

977 posts in 915 days


#7 posted 01-11-2016 04:17 AM

That blade is too thick to be just used for scoring. The special cut and the rust suggests that its a wet cutter for solid surface cutting.

M

-- Madmark - Madmark2150@yahoo.com Wiretreefarm.com

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

4224 posts in 3196 days


#8 posted 01-11-2016 04:31 AM

I’ve seen blades like that for machining thick sheets of plastic, for fabricating leak-proof joints in water tanks and fuel cells.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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Harry

71 posts in 642 days


#9 posted 01-11-2016 04:38 AM



That blade is too thick to be just used for scoring. The special cut and the rust suggests that its a wet cutter for solid surface cutting.

M

- MadMark

EVERYTHING had rust on it that I bought :(

-- Harry - Professional amateur

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MrUnix

4216 posts in 1661 days


#10 posted 01-11-2016 04:41 AM

That blade is too thick to be just used for scoring. The special cut and the rust suggests that its a wet cutter for solid surface cutting.
- MadMark

Maybe… but if you follow the link I gave above, it shows an 8” blade almost identical, with the same 3/8” kerf width, specifically for the task mentioned. And it is described as “Carbide Tipped V-groover for scoring and folding applications” (and is way expensive!! :)

Rust just indicates it hasn’t been used for a long while. I’ve had TS blades that were as rusty or rustier still installed on the saw when purchased, and certainly not used in a wet environment. Nothing that a little evapo-rust or electrolysis won’t take care of though.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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Harry

71 posts in 642 days


#11 posted 01-11-2016 05:04 AM

It’s going into my electrolysis bath tomorrow. Wow those blades are $$$

-- Harry - Professional amateur

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7910 posts in 1842 days


#12 posted 01-11-2016 05:22 AM



It s going into my electrolysis bath tomorrow. Wow those blades are $$$

- Harry

Is that safe for the brazing? It probably is, but I never hear of anyone using electrolysis on carbide TS blades. I’m asking because I don’t know.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Harry

71 posts in 642 days


#13 posted 01-11-2016 06:42 AM

Is that safe for the brazing? It probably is, but I never hear of anyone using electrolysis on carbide TS blades. I m asking because I don t know.

- Rick M.

Good point, I just searched around a bit and didnt find a good answer yet. Guess I’ll wait with the bath, not like I need to use this cutter tomorrow.

-- Harry - Professional amateur

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bandit571

14560 posts in 2145 days


#14 posted 01-11-2016 06:57 AM

I’d put it on the saw, raise it up, and run some pine through the saw, let the cut wipe the rust away..

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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MrUnix

4216 posts in 1661 days


#15 posted 01-11-2016 05:57 PM

Is that safe for the brazing? It probably is, but I never hear of anyone using electrolysis on carbide TS blades. I m asking because I don t know.
- Rick M.

I’ve done carbide tipped blades and it didn’t seem to have any adverse effects on them. Maybe if you used one as the sacrificial anode it might though. But if you don’t feel comfortable with the process, then just dunk it in some evapo-rust instead. Laid flat in a shallow container, you wouldn’t need much and you can re-use it over and over again on all the other smaller rusty stuff you have. I have an old gallon paint can about half filled with it, with a wire basket in it for dunking nuts, bolts, washers and other little items. I love the stuff, and it’s also a lot less messy :)

Hold on a bit, and I’m sure others will chime in about other methods as well (citric acid, molasses, etc…)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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