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Carving the Santa with a Bear

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Forum topic by ClaudeF posted 01-10-2016 04:40 PM 417 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ClaudeF

276 posts in 1170 days


01-10-2016 04:40 PM

Topic tags/keywords: santa bear progress tutorial basswood

A rough out is not always necessary for carving. I began this project with a photograph of what my customer wanted and a block of basswood 12×6 x 3 inches. I copied the photo to the block front with carbon paper and the side views were my best guess as to what they should look like, as I only had the photo for the front. I then cut out the outline on my bandsaw.

Claude

-- https://www.etsy.com/shop/ClaudesWoodcarving


6 replies so far

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ClaudeF

276 posts in 1170 days


#1 posted 01-10-2016 04:42 PM

The next step was to begin removing the waste wood and creating my own rough out from the cut out.

-- https://www.etsy.com/shop/ClaudesWoodcarving

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ClaudeF

276 posts in 1170 days


#2 posted 01-10-2016 04:46 PM

With much of the waste wood removed, I could now begin the detail carving. In this photo you can see that the details of the face are pretty much finished, as is the belt. I tend to carve a little bit here and a little bit there all over the carving instead of trying to do one spot all the way to done. I usually do the face earlier, as if I mess up or something breaks, I can always carve deeper and create a new face.

-- https://www.etsy.com/shop/ClaudesWoodcarving

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ClaudeF

276 posts in 1170 days


#3 posted 01-10-2016 04:51 PM

The carving of the details is now complete and the painting can begin. Notice the “mat” in the final photo? This is just a piece of rubberized drawer liner. I put it on the bench so that the carving will not slide around so easily. I use the same drawer liner between the wood block and the bench when I clamp the block down with F clamps so I can use a mallet and gouge. The rubber keeps the carving steady and doesn’t allow it rotate under the clamp.

-- https://www.etsy.com/shop/ClaudesWoodcarving

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ClaudeF

276 posts in 1170 days


#4 posted 01-10-2016 04:54 PM

The painting is now complete. I’m only putting one photo here – the rest of the complete photos are in my projects. When I paint something like this, I do the white areas first, then the thin washes, such as the face (burnt sienna, thinned with water 1:12).

Claude

-- https://www.etsy.com/shop/ClaudesWoodcarving

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hunter71

2731 posts in 2649 days


#5 posted 01-11-2016 01:07 AM

t almost all my blocks. Then use my Fordom to round things out anymore.

-- A childs smile is payment enough.

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BurlyBob

3674 posts in 1728 days


#6 posted 01-11-2016 02:01 AM

Just flat out amazing!

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