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Sprained thumb.... how to hold small pieces in a mitersaw?

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Forum topic by Sanderguy777 posted 01-08-2016 11:22 PM 880 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Sanderguy777

158 posts in 662 days


01-08-2016 11:22 PM

Topic tags/keywords: humor jig tip question miter saw clamp

I sprained my thumb cutting a small piece of wood the other day. I think it is OK but I like my hand in ONE piece and without carbide and steel in it….SOOO….

Does anybody have a suggestion on how to hold small pieces in a miter saw? I have a clamp that came with it but it is REALLY slow and doesn’t hold most small pieces I work with. I also need the suggestions to only include shop built stuff because Tonga doesn’t have the “Ten Million Dollar” finger thing that Fastcap makes.

My ideas are: Make a holder like Fastcap’s (I don’t know what to make the forked side from though) Make one like like the one in this video Make my own design with hand tools so I don’t loose any fingers making safety equipment ;)

Thanks for any ideas

P.S. I know that I should get a Saw Stop…Anybody seen if they have a miter saw or have a safe of money for me to get it?


15 replies so far

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Sanderguy777

158 posts in 662 days


#1 posted 01-08-2016 11:24 PM

Sorry… here’s the link

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ysEHgZktsiU

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dhazelton

2322 posts in 1757 days


#2 posted 01-08-2016 11:31 PM

Doesn’t answer you question but I would cut stuff that small on a band saw.

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conifur

955 posts in 612 days


#3 posted 01-08-2016 11:39 PM

I use a make shift miter box and my Jap hand saws for small pieces, I had a scary but lucky experience doing it on a CPMS, never again. BS works too.

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

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Sanderguy777

158 posts in 662 days


#4 posted 01-09-2016 12:46 AM

I don’t have a band saw :( But if you have that safe…..

I could do some of my small stuff with hand tools, but most is stuff that needs precision angles and I don’t have a miter box. I guess that could be an interesting project.

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TheFridge

5764 posts in 946 days


#5 posted 01-09-2016 12:50 AM

Sled on table saw?

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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JAAune

1634 posts in 1777 days


#6 posted 01-09-2016 01:05 AM

A handsaw and miter box are my preferred method too. If a power saw must be used, a zero clearance fence and base are a necessity and the parts can be clamped with a mechanical fixture. Toggle clamps and sandpaper-faced fixtures do a good job of holding small pieces of wood in place.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

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conifur

955 posts in 612 days


#7 posted 01-09-2016 03:05 AM

Double sided tape has its place also when working with small pieces.

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

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pjones46

986 posts in 2103 days


#8 posted 01-09-2016 04:19 AM

Clamp an auxiliary upright sacrificial fence on both sides of the miter saw to bridge the opening in the saws fence and support your cut. Keep the material up tight against the fence. This fence will also act as a zero clearance insert. If your miter saw is a sliding type push it as far back toward the fence before you make a cut. All these should reduce the chance of kick back coupled with your holder in the video.

-- Respectfully, Paul

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dhazelton

2322 posts in 1757 days


#9 posted 01-09-2016 01:06 PM

If you don’t have a bandsaw I’d say it’s time for a shopping trip. Lot’s of used Craftsmans out there that would be perfect for that.

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Sanderguy777

158 posts in 662 days


#10 posted 01-09-2016 06:46 PM

I would love to get a band saw but it’s not in the budget for a while.

Yes, it is a SCMS. I love the thing.

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Richard H

489 posts in 1141 days


#11 posted 01-09-2016 07:03 PM

You can saw by hand very precisely with a little practice. If you can layout the line you want to cut to either by pencil or knife line (easier to follow) you can cut to it. if it’s a common angle a shooting board lets you fit the piece a thousandth of a inch at a time as well. I was a very dedicated follower of the School of Woodworking by Norm for a long time and I rarely cut small pieces with machines anymore as it’s just faster, safer and more accurate to do it by handsaw and shooting board.

If you really don’t want to go that route a crosscut sled on your tablesaw that supports both sides of the piece is probably the next best thing. Anything shorter than about a foot doesn’t belong on a miter saw in my opinion.

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pjones46

986 posts in 2103 days


#12 posted 01-09-2016 07:08 PM

Forgot to mention that blade chice is very important where hook angle helps prevent the blade from being too aggressive and pushes the work piece down and towards the fence.

-- Respectfully, Paul

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nailbanger2

1041 posts in 2604 days


#13 posted 01-09-2016 08:13 PM

I know the safety cops are going to come out on this one. This is my method, and it’s not for everyone, but…..
take another piece the same thickness as the one you are cutting and set it on the saw bed about a foot away. Then take a 1×2 or similar scrap stock and set it on top of the two pieces. By putting hand pressure on the 1×2 you can “clamp” the piece to be cut. A sharp blade helps. Don’t do anything you don’t feel comfortable with.

-- Wish I were Norm's Nephew

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KWood75

10 posts in 367 days


#14 posted 01-10-2016 04:29 AM

I used a tablesaw sled if there’s enough wood to hold safetly. Otherwise, bandsaw then finish up on my disc sander.

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rustynails

662 posts in 1989 days


#15 posted 01-10-2016 04:36 AM

I have one of the Ten Million Dollar” fingers that Fastcap makes and it work great. One thing is it fast to use and no set up.

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