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Forum topic by edwood1975 posted 01-08-2016 09:47 PM 436 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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edwood1975

495 posts in 807 days


01-08-2016 09:47 PM

Topic tags/keywords: face frame cabinets drawers frame and panel doors dado stack

So I’ve decided to finally build my mitre saw station and i am in the middle of designing it on sketchup..

I’m basically trying to do 2 36” wide base cabinets with a 24” shelf or platform to rest the mitre saw on so its flush between the 2 cabinets.

I would like each unit to have 1 or 2 drawers and cabinet doors below

I’m wondering should I use cabinets with face frame or not I know that it’s only the workshop but I’m trying to add a little style to it.. And the shop

Cost is a factor and because these will be the first cabinets I’ve built in not looking to mimic a pro cabinet maker but I would like the experience in the event I need to make them ..

Thanks guys

Ps: there will be slot of firsts in this project..
I.e. Dado stack usage Frame and panel doors Drawer assembly Fitting drawer runners

-- Ed


6 replies so far

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greg48

588 posts in 2222 days


#1 posted 01-08-2016 10:10 PM

Face frames on a plywood cabinet is always a nice skill to devolop especially if you wish to add a profile like a quarter round or chamfer and they can easily be made with pocket screws.

Here’s a tip for buying lumber for the frame. Find a hardwood purveyor, his board foot costs will be a lot less than the lineal foot costs offered by the big box store.

If you are planning on making the rails and stiles of your doors with plywood, then I wouldn’t bother with a face frame, IMO.

-- Greg, No. Cal. - "Gaudete in Domino Semper"

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edwood1975

495 posts in 807 days


#2 posted 01-08-2016 10:55 PM



Face frames on a plywood cabinet is always a nice skill to devolop especially if you wish to add a profile like a quarter round or chamfer and they can easily be made with pocket screws.

Here s a tip for buying lumber for the frame. Find a hardwood purveyor, his board foot costs will be a lot less than the lineal foot costs offered by the big box store.

If you are planning on making the rails and stiles of your doors with plywood, then I wouldn t bother with a face frame, IMO.

- greg48


Thanks for the tip , I wouldn’t use ply for this I was thinking of poplar it’s a cheaper bf price, I’m thinking 2.5” wide should be good

-- Ed

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MT_Stringer

2853 posts in 2695 days


#3 posted 01-08-2016 11:25 PM

Did someone say Poplar?
It just so happens I am building a coffee bar for my mom. It will be painted to match her existing cabinets,
The frame is poplar built using pocket hole construction. That’s the way I do it.

Two inch stiles, 1 1/2 for the bottom, and 2 inch for the top rail, and and 1 1/2 middle rail.

I still have to put the shaker style trim on each end. She wanted bead board, so I installed it, then cut the pieces to trim it out.

For the carcase, I used prefinished birch. No painting inside for me! :-)

Here is a drawing of what it will look like when I am finished and it is in place.

Face frame construction…

Dry fit on the trim.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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Grandpa

3256 posts in 2140 days


#4 posted 01-09-2016 12:22 AM

In my opinion the face frame will make it more stable or stronger. It will not want to lean to the side where kitchen cabinet will attaché to a wall most of the time. That is my thinking.

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FirehouseWoodworking

689 posts in 2737 days


#5 posted 01-09-2016 01:47 AM

I like the face frame option.

I think it strengthens the carcase. It is also more “forgiving” when it comes to building the doors. They don’t have to be exact and there is not as much finesse work when it comes to fitting doors. Of course, that assumes concealed European hinges or overlay hinges.

On the other hand, when building “fine” furniture or cabinetry, nothing beats fitted inlay doors.

Cheers!

-- Dave; Lansing, Kansas

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AlanBienlein

159 posts in 2139 days


#6 posted 01-09-2016 02:01 AM

I built mine with a face frame to make it stiffer.


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