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Forum topic by CudaDude posted 01-08-2016 02:26 PM 847 views 0 times favorited 24 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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CudaDude

176 posts in 1770 days


01-08-2016 02:26 PM

I did some rearranging and need to move the 220v. The walls are closed up except for the area around the subpanel and the area where to 220v currently is. I have complete access to the subpanel and rafter area. I want to run Romex in the attic area from the panel to the wall where the 220v needs to be. I want to drop the romex from the attic into a section of conduit and surface mount the 220 outlet. I want to surface mount in case I decide to move it in the future. What I need help with is the transition from ‘open’ romex in the attic to the conduit. Do I need to be concerned with chafing of the wire at the top of the conduit, or can I just simply be slid into the conduit? Suggestions on different method of running the 220? I don’t want drop inside the wall because I will more than likely rearrange again and don’t want random 220’s here and there. Thanks in advance.

-- Gary


24 replies so far

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johnstoneb

2143 posts in 1635 days


#1 posted 01-08-2016 02:36 PM

There are fittings available similar to a gland nut that will clamp the wire preventing chafing and also sealing the top of the conduit to keep critters and trash out of the conduit.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

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crank49

3981 posts in 2433 days


#2 posted 01-08-2016 03:13 PM

You shouldn’t run “Romex” in conduit. Not rated for that.
Put a j-box on top of the conduit using a proper connector and bushing, then splice and run THHN down the conduit.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

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alittleoff

296 posts in 738 days


#3 posted 01-08-2016 03:24 PM

Romax is fine in conduit. Conduit is to be used for protective cover. It’s code to put it in conduit where exposed. As for the fitting, just get a conduit connector, put it on the conduit then put a 1/2” plastic bushing on it. Lowes should have what you need. You could also use a compression type coupling instead of the bushing and connector if they don’t have the bushing.
Gerald

Most people don’t use anything, just leave a loop of wire where it enters the conduit so it won’t be stretched.

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WhyMe

612 posts in 1023 days


#4 posted 01-08-2016 03:37 PM

Use an EMT insulating bushing on the end of EMT where the romex enters.

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Fred Hargis

3933 posts in 1955 days


#5 posted 01-08-2016 03:56 PM

I needed to do that in my basement, coming out of a suspended ceiling down a concrete wall. I just put one of those plastic bushings on the end of the conduit where the romex entered and then ran it down the wall to the outlet box.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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bkseitz

294 posts in 772 days


#6 posted 01-08-2016 03:58 PM

Given you’re messing with 220 and running it through your house and transitioning to conduit, I’d suggest you talk with a local electrician about code and best practice. The last thing you want is an insurance company voiding a claim should there be a problem, even if that electrical wiring wasn’t the issue, because you didn’t follow code.

-- bkseitz, Washington "if everything is going well, you've obviously overlooked something"

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CudaDude

176 posts in 1770 days


#7 posted 01-08-2016 09:26 PM

thanks for the replies. What I’m doing is pretty simple, I just tend to overcomplicate things. The insulating bushing sounds like the solution I need.

-- Gary

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cracknpop

194 posts in 1811 days


#8 posted 01-09-2016 04:21 AM

Good advice above.

But here’s another thought. Not sure what you are running off your 220, but in my shop where most tools are on casters, I have longer cords on my 220v TS, shaper, and planer allowing me to put them where I want them and still reach the plug. Of course, your cords will need to be rated for 220v and amp load.

-- Rick - I know I am not perfect, but I will keep pressing on toward the goal of becoming all I am called to be.

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TheFridge

5765 posts in 948 days


#9 posted 01-09-2016 04:23 AM



Use an EMT insulating bushing on the end of EMT where the romex enters.

- WhyMe

Ditto.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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Holbs

1372 posts in 1491 days


#10 posted 01-09-2016 11:17 AM

I am unsure since it’s been 2 or 3 years… but I think it is actually against code to put romex in conduit (if ever worried about code, that is). If want to go the official route, go with what crank says about a J-box (4”x4” square metal box & flex or solid conduit with solid core 12 gauge wires). If not worried about code, the world is all yours :)

-- Yes, my profile picture is of a Carpenter Bee! The name is derived from the Ancient Greek "wood-cutter"

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dhazelton

2324 posts in 1758 days


#11 posted 01-09-2016 01:22 PM

The correct way is to run Romex to a junction box and transition to conduit and THHN/THWN wire inside that to your receptacle. The idea is that wire in insulated sheathing inside conduit will get too warm. You’‘re not even supposed to use Romex that you’ve stripped the sheathing off of, but I’ll bet it’s done all the time.

Your easiest option is:
https://wirencable.com/8-3-heavy-duty-welder-extension-cord-25ft-or-50ft/?gclid=CK2wtcjtnMoCFcOQHwodtCYFTg

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becikeja

645 posts in 2275 days


#12 posted 01-09-2016 01:59 PM

Double check your local code requirements. If you have existing conduit, I would suspect this is a code requirement otherwise the original wiring would have been done with romex as it is less costly. A few years ago, when I was living in Chicago, I got into a long discussion with the Electrical Manager at an HD (ok not the best source) who assured me romex was acceptable or he wouldn’t be selling it. Did a little investigating and discovered that was not the case. The circuit had to be run in conduit to meet city code if I was in the city limits which I was. Since then I have moved back to the south and romex is used everywhere and perfectly acceptable.

-- Don't outsmart your common sense

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WhyMe

612 posts in 1023 days


#13 posted 01-09-2016 03:22 PM


I am unsure since it s been 2 or 3 years… but I think it is actually against code to put romex in conduit (if ever worried about code, that is).
- Holbs

Putting Romex in conduit is not a NEC violation. The NEC gives provisions for when Romex is placed in conduit as to how the conduit is to be sized.


The correct way is to run Romex to a junction box and transition to conduit and THHN/THWN wire inside that to your receptacle. The idea is that wire in insulated sheathing inside conduit will get too warm.
- dhazelton
Using Romex in a complete system install of conduit is not a best practice. Using conduit for sleeves and protection of Romex is proper. Having a short length of the Romex from where it goes from the ceiling down to the outlet box in conduit is not an incorrect way to do it. It may not be your way, but is not an incorrect way.

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alittleoff

296 posts in 738 days


#14 posted 01-09-2016 03:54 PM

Make sure that your wearing proper electrical atire.
Hard hat, cloves, steel toe boots, etc.
Set up barriers
Call electric dept. For permit
Shut off all power.
Check with OSHA for jobsite approval
Install bushing carefully.
Call for inspection.
Gerald :-)

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jbay

812 posts in 361 days


#15 posted 01-09-2016 04:14 PM

I would run conduit from the panel to where you want your outlet except I would pull some #8 or #10 wire and put in a small sub panel. Then I would come off you sub panel to your outlet. It would be done right and you have future room for other options later. Even if you don’t want the sub-panel it would be easiest to just run MC cable all the way from the panel to the outlet.

-- My “MO” involves Judging others, playing God, acting as LJs law enforcement, and never admitting any of my ideas could possibly be wrong or anyone else's idea could possibly be correct -- (A1Jim)

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