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Routers are scary!

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Forum topic by TheWoodRaccoon posted 01-07-2016 10:32 PM 1756 views 0 times favorited 45 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TheWoodRaccoon

364 posts in 397 days


01-07-2016 10:32 PM

I was using my 2 1/4 HP router with a straightedge and a 1/4 straight bit to cut some ply wood to size for a mobile base I’m designing for my bandsaw. I was taking it slow, making two passes to get through the 3/4in ply. 1/2 way through my second pass, it stopped cutting, and I took a look to see why. My eyes enlarged to the size of dinner plates! At first I thought the collet was too loose and that the bit got pushed all the way up into the router, because there was just a short stump. Then I looked at the floor and saw the rest of the router bit lying at my feet! I quickly turned off the router, and called Grizzly Ind. who are now sending me a new set of bits. The router was at crotch level, so I consider myself lucky that it broke the way it did and fell straight to the floor. :p Because the entire shank broke, it acted like a spinning top and fell straight down. Would have been a different story had one of the carbides come loose at 30,000 ripm’s, I’d be digging them outta my junk right now….

-- still trying to think of a clever signature......


45 replies so far

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bondogaposis

4037 posts in 1819 days


#1 posted 01-07-2016 10:36 PM

Whoa dude, a router is not a saw.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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conifur

955 posts in 619 days


#2 posted 01-07-2016 10:38 PM

They get my up most attention. I think that was too small of a bit IMHO. How about a ruff cut over sized with a hand held circle saw and then a clean to exact dimensions with the router with a 1/2 or 3/4 straight bit?

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

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Joel_B

294 posts in 849 days


#3 posted 01-07-2016 10:38 PM

I don’t think I would trust another Grizzly bit after that. There are plenty of quality router bits out there, Frued, Whiteside to name a few.

-- Joel, Encinitas, CA

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TheWoodRaccoon

364 posts in 397 days


#4 posted 01-07-2016 10:45 PM



They get my up most attention. I think that was too small of a bit IMHO. How about a ruff cut over sized with a hand held circle saw and then a clean to exact dimensions with the router with a 1/2 or 3/4 straight bit?

- conifur

My mother won’t let a circular saw in the house. :p I was told by a retired cabinet maker that i don’t necessarily need a circular saw, and i can use a router with a straightedge and a 1/4 inch straight bit.

-- still trying to think of a clever signature......

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TheWoodRaccoon

364 posts in 397 days


#5 posted 01-07-2016 10:48 PM


Whoa dude, a router is not a saw.

- bondogaposis

I know that. That being said, if you can use a router to cut mortises, there is no reason a router shouln’t be able to cut 3/4 inch ply in two slow passes with a sharp bit. I did everything right: High speed for small bits, taking multiple shallow passes, slower feed rate, etc

Here is the qoute, in response to my shop tour video on another forum:

Nice tour! A couple of comments:

1. Your mother should be proud to have a son that is not only willing to learn how to work with his hands like a man, but is proficient at it and respected amongst craftsmen. That is a rare thing in the USA today.

2. You don’t need a circular saw to cut your planks. Your router, a 1/4” straight bit and a straight edge will cut them far better than any circular saw ever will. Note- the router is the single most versatile tool in your shop, and can (with jigs and know-how), do just about anything that you would want done.

-Wild Bill

-- still trying to think of a clever signature......

View shampeon's profile

shampeon

1718 posts in 1651 days


#6 posted 01-07-2016 10:50 PM

Then use it outside the house. 8^)

Ironically, the bandsaw would be safer than both of them, but a circular saw >>>>>>>>> router for this job any and all days of the week. A jig saw for the initial cut and then a cleanup pass with the router to make a straight line would be far safer, if the circular saw is out of the question.

Edit: even if you’re cutting mortises with a router, the proper way to do it is to hog out most of the material with a drill or brace, then do a final pass with the router to clean things up. Routers aren’t designed for what you’re trying to do with them. The spin very, very fast, and in your case, the heat from contacting the wood on both sides of the cut led to the shaft failure. Learn from this, yo.

-- ian | "You can't stop what's coming. It ain't all waiting on you. That's vanity."

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conifur

955 posts in 619 days


#7 posted 01-07-2016 11:01 PM

2. You don’t need a circular saw to cut your planks. Your router, a 1/4” straight bit and a straight edge will cut them far better than any circular saw ever will. Note- the router is the single most versatile tool in your shop, and can (with jigs and know-how), do just about anything that you would want done.

I guess you found out other wise!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

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MT_Stringer

2854 posts in 2698 days


#8 posted 01-07-2016 11:08 PM

I usually make 1/8 – 1/4 inch passes. I think you put too much strain on the bit and it gave way. Just my thinking.

So far (knocks on wood), I have never broken a bit. That dates back to the seventies. I did have a router crater (at 16,000 rpm), but it just slowed down and quit.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View JayT's profile (online now)

JayT

4787 posts in 1679 days


#9 posted 01-07-2016 11:13 PM

3/4 in two passes is way too much stress on the bit. Max depth I ever cut is 1/4in and then only if it’s a very short pass and easy to machine wood.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

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TheWoodRaccoon

364 posts in 397 days


#10 posted 01-07-2016 11:23 PM

Thanks for the helpful input guys! Looking back on it, 3/8 inch per pass was indeed too much. But, i cant justify the time it takes to setup the router and do 4 or 5 passes….

I like the idea of rough cutting with the jigsaw and cleaning it up with the router, i’ll try that next!

-- still trying to think of a clever signature......

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TheWoodRaccoon

364 posts in 397 days


#11 posted 01-07-2016 11:25 PM


2. You don’t need a circular saw to cut your planks. Your router, a 1/4” straight bit and a straight edge will cut them far better than any circular saw ever will. Note- the router is the single most versatile tool in your shop, and can (with jigs and know-how), do just about anything that you would want done.

I guess you found out other wise!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

- conifur

He is correct in regards to the router having better cut quality, and being the most versatile, but it is way slower. I was in the wrong however, i put too much strain on the bit.

-- still trying to think of a clever signature......

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MrUnix

4247 posts in 1666 days


#12 posted 01-07-2016 11:27 PM

Looking back on it, 3/8 inch per pass was indeed too much. But, i cant justify the time it takes to setup the router and do 4 or 5 passes….
- TheWoodRaccoon

Would take less time than waiting for a new bit to arrive – and cheaper, unless Grizzly is willing to give you a pass again (which was rather nice of them considering).

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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conifur

955 posts in 619 days


#13 posted 01-07-2016 11:27 PM

But, i cant justify the time it takes to setup the router and do 4 or 5 passes….
Thats what they all said, till after the 4 hours minimum spent at the ER.

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

628 posts in 1420 days


#14 posted 01-07-2016 11:28 PM

I agree that two passes is way too aggressive. However, I have also had an experience with a router bit failing. Scary. Mine was a 1/4” shank (the only router I owned at the time) round over bit. It is so long ago that I do not recall the exact radius. Brand new carbide bit and I was checking things out on a piece of scrap. Very first cut of no more than 1/4” into the piece with the intention to go to the final depth in successive passes. About three inches into the pass there was a loud noise and the router started shaking. After shutting down I found that one of the two carbide cutters had fractured. Fortunately the shard from the bit was still embedded in the workpiece. I mailed the piece of wood with the carbide embedded to the manufacturer and never heard back.

I am now extra cautious the first time I start up a new router bit, or saw blade, etc.

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TheWoodRaccoon

364 posts in 397 days


#15 posted 01-07-2016 11:38 PM



I agree that two passes is way too aggressive. However, I have also had an experience with a router bit failing. Scary. Mine was a 1/4” shank (the only router I owned at the time) round over bit. It is so long ago that I do not recall the exact radius. Brand new carbide bit and I was checking things out on a piece of scrap. Very first cut of no more than 1/4” into the piece with the intention to go to the final depth in successive passes. About three inches into the pass there was a loud noise and the router started shaking. After shutting down I found that one of the two carbide cutters had fractured. Fortunately the shard from the bit was still embedded in the workpiece. I mailed the piece of wood with the carbide embedded to the manufacturer and never heard back.

I am now extra cautious the first time I start up a new router bit, or saw blade, etc.

- Kazooman

Wow, thats scary! Happy you turned out okay! I wonder what the manufacturer thought when they got it back…made me chuckle. :)

-- still trying to think of a clever signature......

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