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Delta/Rockwell Bandsaw Motor Questions

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Forum topic by MikeUT posted 01-07-2016 06:53 PM 333 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MikeUT

123 posts in 820 days


01-07-2016 06:53 PM

Hey Guys,

I bought a Rockwell/Delta band saw a few days ago and am having fun cleaning and tuning it up. The guy told me it was 20 years old and has been in storage for the last 10 but the saw was actually made in 1983. I was secretly happy about this but used it as a reason to beat him down a bit more on the price. The saw ran quite smooth when I bought it but it had a few rusty parts and was pretty dirty so I have been busy cleaning it up. I have cleaned up all of the adjustment mechanisms as well as the guide assemblies.

The motor has a little vibration, especially as it is starting up. The thing is full of 20 year old sawdust that I would like to clean out and I would like to check the motor bearings to make sure they are good. The only problem is that I haven’t ever opened up an induction motor and I am a little nervous about doing more harm than good. How much of a mess are they inside? I searched briefly and couldn’t find any tutorials or instructions on how to play around inside. any advice would be greatly appreciated.


4 replies so far

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conifur

955 posts in 612 days


#1 posted 01-07-2016 06:59 PM

If belt driven the belt may have a set in it from not being run. Or/and in transportation may have gotten some of that saw dust on into some of the drive and causing some of that vibration.

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

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MrUnix

4207 posts in 1660 days


#2 posted 01-07-2016 07:23 PM

4 bolts/nuts and it pops right open. Clean it out, clean the centrifugal switch and verify it’s operating properly, and swap out the bearings while you have it open. Most of those motors use pretty standard 6202’s or 6203’s which will set you back about $10 for the pair. You can’t really tell the bearings condition without taking off the seals, and since you already have it open, it’s usually better to just replace them so you can be sure they are good for another 30 years or so.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: It’s a good idea to mark the end bells so you can put them back on in the same place/orientation… and take pictures along the way in case you forget where something goes.

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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MikeUT

123 posts in 820 days


#3 posted 01-07-2016 09:24 PM

Thanks guys,

Brad- you actually convinced me to get this saw earlier this week, I’m glad I followed your advice. I pulled it apart and the bearings LOOK brand new but that doesn’t mean they are inside. They spin easily and freely but come to a stop pretty quick. Is this an indication that they need to be replaced?

Also, the inside of the motor has quite a bit of rust. Should I try to clean it off or should I leave it alone?

Thanks again.

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MrUnix

4207 posts in 1660 days


#4 posted 01-07-2016 09:43 PM

I pulled it apart and the bearings LOOK brand new but that doesn’t mean they are inside. They spin easily and freely but come to a stop pretty quick. Is this an indication that they need to be replaced?
- MikeUT

Can’t really tell… a bearing that has sat idle/unused for long enough for the grease to separate will appear to be just fine, but will quickly destroy itself once put into sustained use. A new bearing will behave just as you stated (they will not free spin more than a revolution or two), as will one that has had it’s grease turn into a waxy goo. Only opening it up will tell for sure. If they are sealed bearings, you could pull off the seals and check, and even clean and re-pack if you want… but given the age of the bearings, their unknown history and the hassle involved cleaning/re-packing, it’s usually better to just go ahead and replace them (particularly since you already have the motor open) – and then you can be sure they are good, rather than find out otherwise later on. If they were for something like a shaper where the bearings can be a few hundred dollars each, it would be different… but the bearings on your motor are like $5 a piece or less from places like Accurate Bearing.

As for the rust, I wouldn’t go overboard on it… some wd-40 and a scotch-brite pad should clean it up good enough. Then hit everything with some compressed air and you should be good to go. Don’t forget to check the centrifugal switch contacts and clean them up if needed.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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