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Infeed/outfeed planer table compression bracket

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Forum topic by amagineer posted 01-07-2016 05:54 PM 1244 views 2 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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amagineer

1414 posts in 2061 days


01-07-2016 05:54 PM

Topic tags/keywords: jig question planer

As we all know planer snipe can be difficult. I have a Dewalt DW733 planer with infeed and outfeed tables that are adjusted by a set of hex head bolts. It doesn’t matter what technique I used,I would get snipe to some degree. If I raise the tables to high the wood could bind, so I thought if the tables could put adjustable pressure upward and have the ability to adjust to the wood going in and going out it might help. As you can see in the pictures I made an aluminum bracket with a 1/2 carriage bolt and a compression spring on the end which is adjustable. I have one on both the infeed and outfeed tables I put a piece of cherry thru and there was no snipe, so I lowered the brackets and put the cherry thru again and got snipe. I readjusted the tension on the compression bracket and after running the cherry thru one more time the snipe was gone.

I will be experimenting with different woods and thicknesses to see if it will work in all situations.

I am looking for your input on whether this is a good idea or bad, also any improvements they would make to this design.

Don

-- Flaws are only in the eye of the artisan!


15 replies so far

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JKMDETAIL

172 posts in 1119 days


#1 posted 01-07-2016 06:05 PM

Thanks for posting this. I have the same planer and the same issues. Can be very discouraging some day.

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pintodeluxe

4856 posts in 2277 days


#2 posted 01-07-2016 06:44 PM

I am intrigued with your clever setup. I have a similar setup- the 735 on the same stand. With the stock setup I don’t get any snipe, but realize many people do have that problem. I am perplexed how that little spring could do anything to overcome the downward pressure of the feed rollers. It seems like the spring would quickly bottom out until the extension tables hit their stops. I am amazed that it does anything at all, but it sure looks cool. Bottom line if it works, it works. I can’t argue with success.

Does the 733 have a manual cutterhead lock like the 734?

Let us know how it works with longer boards and thicker stock. Nice job with the fabrication by the way.

Thanks for posting.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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HokieKen

1762 posts in 603 days


#3 posted 01-07-2016 08:39 PM

Very good solution to a PITA problem with most lunchbox planers. I have a Delta and have the same snipe issues. I can minimize it by lifting the end of the board on both ends but can’t consistently and completely eliminate it.

I can’t see any design flaws other than the fact that over time the aluminum angle is going to take a set. Not a big deal since you made it adjustable but you may loose the ends of a board or 2. Are you using the bracket on both ends or just 1? I’d also be curious how high it holds the table above the planer bed when only 1 roller is engaged and how high it is after the second roller engages. I also wonder if on wide boards you might see some snipe on 1 side? With your bracket in the center, you’re essentially creating a pivot point that the table can flex around. If that were the case, a bracket on each side might solve that problem.

Please keep us updated on your findings. If this proves to be a generally effective solution, I’ll definitely be copying it!

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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amagineer

1414 posts in 2061 days


#4 posted 01-07-2016 09:34 PM

Willie—yes the 733 has a manual cutterhead lock.

Kenny—-I was unsure of the amount of pressure the compression spring needs to be, so I went to Lowe’s and bought the only compression spring they had and put two in each carriage bolt. Because the bracket and spring are adjustable I just adjusted the pressure on the table until there was no snipe. My test pieces were 2” x 3” x 24” cherry and 2” x 2” x 14” black walnut. I agree with you about the aluminum bracket. As to planing wide boards I am hoping the table mounting bolts will be supportive enough not to bend. I will be experimenting later this week with wider boards and keep you updated.
Don

-- Flaws are only in the eye of the artisan!

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Ken90712

16955 posts in 2653 days


#5 posted 01-08-2016 04:45 PM

Awesome I’ll be giving it a try!!!!

-- Ken, "Everyday above ground is a good day!"

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Scott C.

149 posts in 1515 days


#6 posted 01-08-2016 05:57 PM

I have a 733 and have found that I can can basically eliminate snipe if I put the boards in end to end and run sacrificial pieces of scrap at the beginning and end of the run. It involves a bit of dancing back and forth around the planer and I’m sweating by the end of a milling session, but it’s dramatically improved the snipe problem.

-- measure twice, cut once, swear and start over.

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amagineer

1414 posts in 2061 days


#7 posted 01-08-2016 06:33 PM

Scott; I was doing the same dance, but, putting exotic hardwood thru the planer and finding a sacrificial board the same thickness was not easy. Some even will allow three inches on each end and cut the snipe off, but with the cost of wood these days I could end up with a lot of money sitting in the scrap box.
Don

-- Flaws are only in the eye of the artisan!

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amagineer

1414 posts in 2061 days


#8 posted 01-12-2016 06:55 PM

This is an update; I took a 5/4×8” x 24” piece of bowed cherry and put it thru the planer. I noticed snipe on the leading edge of the wood, but none on the trailing end. I put the board thru again and this time I lifted the infeed table while the board was feeding and I got rid of the snipe. I think the infeed table compression spring is to weak. it is only 7 lbs of pressure. I am going to double that with new springs and see if that takes care of the problem.
Don

-- Flaws are only in the eye of the artisan!

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pintodeluxe

4856 posts in 2277 days


#9 posted 01-12-2016 09:37 PM

That sounds like an interesting experiment. Don’t let a bowed board be the final judge however. After all a planer is not intended to straighten lumber, only make it thinner!

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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HokieKen

1762 posts in 603 days


#10 posted 01-13-2016 03:31 PM

Sounds like you’ve found a good solution to a common problem! I hope it will prove to be effective in the long run and that you’ll keep us updated with any issues you run into.

What I’m wondering is if you even need the compression springs though? I’ve been thinking for some time that the issue with the in/out feed tables is that the screws that adjust the height are right next to the planer bed and that doesn’t prevent the sheet metal tables from flexing at the ends where the board is actually supported. I’m thinking that you might find the same results if you use the brackets you have and just use a jam nut to lock the carriage bolt at a fixed height and eliminate the springs altogether. Next time I have a bundle to mill, I’ll try some simple blocking to raise the ends of the tables and prevent flexing and see how it does.

Thanks again for posting this for our benefit!

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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amagineer

1414 posts in 2061 days


#11 posted 01-13-2016 03:42 PM

I can not figure out why the infeed table on the Dewalt DW733 planer is .060 lower then the gasket plate below the rollers and blade. If the board was level with the gasket plate then the first roller would not be able to angle the board going into the blade causing snipe. I talked to a Dewalt repair tech and he told me that this step in the infeed has nothing to do with snipe on my machine. Since there is no adjustment for the infeed plate I put two (.030×3” wide) strips of UHMW on the leading edge to even the infeed table with the gasket plate. This I found eliminates the snipe when planing short pieces. I am still using the compression spring for the longer pieces. If anyone has any comments it would be appreciated.
Don

-- Flaws are only in the eye of the artisan!

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amagineer

1414 posts in 2061 days


#12 posted 01-13-2016 03:55 PM

Kenny; I agree with you that a fixed carriage bolt would fix the problem, but I made the bracket from aluminum and that is flexible. Your idea has got me wondering; if I took two shelf brackets with a carriage bolt and two nuts to level the infeed table, that would keep the wood level and stop the snipe. I will try this and post the results.
Don

-- Flaws are only in the eye of the artisan!

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HokieKen

1762 posts in 603 days


#13 posted 01-13-2016 04:15 PM

I think some flex might be required to accommodate different board thicknesses. If your setting the ends of the tables up 1/8”, a 1/2” board will have enough flex to run through flat. However a 12/4 board might be too stiff and may not sit flat on the planer bed if there’s no flex in the tables. This is purely theory on my end of course since your the one who’s actually put the rubber to the road. But, I’d be inclined to let the aluminum brackets be the “springs” and use a fixed carriage bolt. Hope I got my point across clearly without muddying the water too much!

Not sure what the “gasket plate” is on the DW733. I’m not familiar with that planer. On my Delta, the tables sit flush with the planer bed and there are screws to adjust the “tilt” of the tables so that the outer ends can be adjusted to sit higher to help with snipe. Like I said earlier though, it doesn’t really work and my suspicion is that it’s because the tables have too much flex in them.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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MadMark

978 posts in 917 days


#14 posted 01-13-2016 08:34 PM

I fix snipe the old fashioned way – with a crosscut saw. Snipe ( & cutter ridges) are a part of life. Break down and plane early while everything is full length not after its been cut to length.

M

-- Madmark - Madmark2150@yahoo.com Wiretreefarm.com

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amagineer

1414 posts in 2061 days


#15 posted 01-13-2016 08:59 PM

Mark; I do plane the boards before cutting to length, but without a drum sander or a jointer I need the planer to get the cut pieces smooth and the same thickness so I can glue them for my end grain cutting boards. I also use the planer after the cutting boards are finished.
Thanks for the info.
Don

-- Flaws are only in the eye of the artisan!

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