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Forum topic by dalec posted 2485 days ago 18943 views 0 times favorited 47 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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dalec

613 posts in 2521 days


2485 days ago

I was reading one of the forum topics and someone in response to a dust collection question, got off on to heating a small shop. Rather than hi-jacking the thread, I thought I would submit the topic as a new one.

Winter is coming, so working in an unheated shop becomes more uncomfortable for many of us. In certain parts of the country heating the shop area is imperative. The thought occurred to me that woodworking produces a lot of saw dust, some that is very fine. Heat (sparks) and fine wood dust is not a great combination.

I realize dust collection is an integral part of managing and protecting us both the direct danger of explosions, but also from the health issue from inhaling fine dust particles. I also realize many of us have some basic dust collection systems, shop vac attached to exhaust ports on table saws and the like. Are there any recommendations regarding heating sources for this type of environment?

Just wanted to get this topic going.

Dalec


47 replies so far

View schroeder's profile

schroeder

669 posts in 2758 days


#1 posted 2484 days ago

We heat with wood stove. It’s very safe, very efficient (being a wood shop n all). If it gets really cold, it sucks til it heats up …and we debate how bad we really need those short scraps of “someday project” wood. I can tell you from experience, there is virtually no danger of a dust explosion. But in the same spirit of trutheness – I wake up nights worrying about the damn woodstove in the shop. If I had my druthers – I’d use electric or forced air.
Thanks for bringing up the topic!
Schroeder

-- The Gnarly Wood Shoppe

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dalec

613 posts in 2521 days


#2 posted 2484 days ago

It sounds that the dust generated in typical woodworking may not approach levels of density necessary to create an explosive mixture of fuel, oxygen and spark/open flame.

Thanks Schroeder

View dennis mitchell's profile

dennis mitchell

3994 posts in 2947 days


#3 posted 2484 days ago

I use wood in my house, but I spray so much finish and lay so much laminate I don’t dare use wood heat. My main heat is a pair of wall mount electric heaters. I’m hoping to get a propane heat system that doesn’t have a pilot light. I’m hoping someone knows about a radiant propane set up. Just a matter of $$$$$$

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Peter Oxley

1426 posts in 2507 days


#4 posted 2484 days ago

Dennis – you might look at Pro-Com, they have several different propane heaters. I’m pretty sure they have a radiant propane wall unit. Northern Tool carries Pro-Com heaters. But have you priced propane recently?

-- http://www.peteroxley.com -- http://north40studios.etsy.com --

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dennis mitchell

3994 posts in 2947 days


#5 posted 2484 days ago

I haven’t yet….can it be worse than my electric bill? I hate to even think about it!

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Peter Oxley

1426 posts in 2507 days


#6 posted 2484 days ago

I just built a shop this year (as you may know) and I was going to go propane because that’s how I heat the house. But with the tank, the pad for the tank, the piping, the furnace, and then the cost of propane, I just bought a Cadet Hot One and hung it on the wall.

According to the DOE website, it takes about 26.75 KWh to produce the same BTU as a gallon of propane. I’m paying about 6½ cents per KWh, so if propane is over $1.74 per gallon, electric is cheaper (26.75 x .065). My last propane delivery for the house was $2.14 per gallon. Time to stock up on space heaters!

-- http://www.peteroxley.com -- http://north40studios.etsy.com --

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dennis mitchell

3994 posts in 2947 days


#7 posted 2484 days ago

That is a nice little electric heater. I used one to heat my trailer when i built my house and it worked great.

View Peter Oxley's profile

Peter Oxley

1426 posts in 2507 days


#8 posted 2484 days ago

I have a 24×36 pole barn with 12’ walls (about 16’ at the peak) and so far the one heater is keeping up. We’ve only gotten down into the high 20s at night, but when I go out in the morning the heater is cycling off and on. Very happy with it so far!

-- http://www.peteroxley.com -- http://north40studios.etsy.com --

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TomK

504 posts in 2507 days


#9 posted 2484 days ago

It was I who gave that thread a hard right turn. Sorry, I work in a network operations center (NOC) where the pace can go from glacial to speed of light in seconds, and that is what happened after that reply. But I appreciate the creation of the new thread and the feedback. I agree, a wood stove is aesthetically pleasing and fuel is no problem, but at times my woodworking time comes in spurts, and the idea of lighting the stove and waiting for it to heat up my garage bothers me. Peter is right too, with price/bbl of good old west Texas crude approaching $100, propane is going up proportionately. And my electric bill is high enough already. I pay almost double what Peter pays per KWh. I’m not too worried about a particulate explosion from wood dust, because I would run the new air dust filter I just ordered for awhile before lighting any heater. Further suggestions from those experienced with this issue will be appreciated.

Thanks dalec!

-- If you think healthcare is expensive now, wait until it's free! PJ O'Rourke

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dalec

613 posts in 2521 days


#10 posted 2484 days ago

I am starting to set up a small shop that shares space in a two car attached garage. It is in an unheated space. I plan to use an electric radiant space heater if I need to work in the shop this winter.

This discussion gets me thinking about my electrical demands on my garage electric circuit and maybe a need to add a circuit or two.

Dalec

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 2932 days


#11 posted 2484 days ago

Our city has an ordinance against wood stoves in garages. To many garage fires!

I have an small old natural gas furnace, that I suspended high up in my vaulted shop ceiling. I blocked off the air vents on it, & ran an 2” plastic pipe from outside directly into the furnace. I also have an electro-static filter on it. I run the fan on continuous, so my shop air is constantly being filtered. I have an automatic set back thermostat, & have it set to 45 degrees for when I’m not in the shop. It only takes a few minutes to get comfortable when I set the override on it. I found that 65 is real comfortable.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View Thos. Angle's profile

Thos. Angle

4435 posts in 2595 days


#12 posted 2484 days ago

The first thing I put in in my shop was a real furnace. I’d spent too many days in cold shops to ever want to do it again. I also have a Blaze King air tight wood stove. When it is really cold at night I load it full and go to bed. And, yeah, I sometimes wake up worried about the stove. We filled the propane tank yesterday and V-1 got us for about $150 more than ever before. We have a pretty small tank. The driver said that right now electric is the cheapest heat. He also said that wood in the valley is pushing $200/cord. By the time I buy diesel for the truck, gas and oil for the stove and take time out from the shop, wood doesn’t come out that much better. Raise the prices again!!! Gotta stay warm and get to town somehow. Danged oil companies.

-- Thos. Angle, Jordan Valley, Oregon

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Brad_Nailor

2531 posts in 2590 days


#13 posted 2484 days ago

Peter I like that Cadet, but I only have a couple 110-20 amp circuits in my garage..anyone have any 110V solutions?

-- http://www.facebook.com/pages/DSO-Designs/297237806954248

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 2932 days


#14 posted 2484 days ago

I’d like to show you my furnace. I paid $25 for it. It’s about 25,00 BTU. In mild weather the pilot light keeps the shop warm.

They were demolishing an old apartment house, & each apartment had its own furnace.

You can see what my outdoor air intake setup looks like. The trap is to prevent cold air from entering when the furnace isn’t running.

You can also see the electrostatic filter at the bottom.

I ran a gas line right from my house gas meter. It doesn’t seem to affect my total gas bill much.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View dalec's profile

dalec

613 posts in 2521 days


#15 posted 2484 days ago

Dick, What a nice and reasonably priced solution to cold winter days in the shop.

Dalec

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