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need help with id on wood please

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Forum topic by kooldecker posted 01-06-2016 07:34 PM 499 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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kooldecker

59 posts in 1037 days


01-06-2016 07:34 PM

Hey guys i have an unidentified piece of lumber from my grandfather. I think it might be mahogany, but in reality i have no clue. All i k ow is that it came from a ship about 60 years ago and its the hardest and most dense wood ive ever handled. Any help i couls get would be much appreciated. Thanks again for being a part of this great site of ours.

-- " I dont understand......I cut that board AT LEAST 4 times and its STILL too short!"


7 replies so far

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4037 posts in 1819 days


#1 posted 01-06-2016 07:53 PM

Well mahogany is not particularly hard or dense, I’d guess that the board on the left is white oak, the other two look like walnut but it is hard to say, really need a close up of the end grain for a better answer.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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LiveEdge

486 posts in 1088 days


#2 posted 01-06-2016 08:13 PM

When you say it came from a ship do you mean it was part of a ship or it came by ship to the US? If it’s the former, it could be teak, although that isn’t particularly heavy.

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tomsteve

394 posts in 687 days


#3 posted 01-06-2016 08:13 PM

im a lil stumped but thinking if they came from the structure of the ship they would be a rot resistant species.
heres a pretty good site to do some diggin on:
http://www.wood-database.com

also has the densities of the species.

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kooldecker

59 posts in 1037 days


#4 posted 01-06-2016 08:20 PM

You know i say that it came from a ship. But as i thought about it, that just the story i was told. And with my grandfather, (lets see, the buckets of mercury go right here next to the live dynomite….....no really….found that when cleaning outthe basement) who knows where it came from.so i wouldnt rule anything out. The pic are all the same wood. Top is raw as i have it, the next two are rips from a small section.

-- " I dont understand......I cut that board AT LEAST 4 times and its STILL too short!"

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kooldecker

59 posts in 1037 days


#5 posted 01-06-2016 08:23 PM

Just posted a closeup of endgrain. It does look like walnut a bit since you said that. But ive never seen walnut this hard.

-- " I dont understand......I cut that board AT LEAST 4 times and its STILL too short!"

View Dave G's profile

Dave G

303 posts in 1516 days


#6 posted 01-06-2016 11:10 PM

First impression of piece number 1 was some variety of oak. More I look less certain I am.

Oak was most common shipbuilding wood. There are over 100 varieties around the world for shipbuilders to scrounge. You almost have to talk yourself OUT of it being oak.

Old wood gets really hard.

-- Dave, New England - “We are made to persist. that's how we find out who we are.” ― Tobias Wolff

View LiveEdge's profile

LiveEdge

486 posts in 1088 days


#7 posted 01-07-2016 05:56 PM

This may be helpful when you look at the endgrain:
http://www.wood-database.com/wood-articles/hardwood-anatomy/

This is pertinent to the picture above:
Aggregate rays Occasionally, some species will have intermittent rays that are many times wider than the rest. These mega-rays are essentially a collection of a number of normal-sized rays grouped together and appearing as one large ray. They are known as aggregate rays.

Perhaps the most well-known commercial lumber in the United States that features aggregate rays is Red Alder (Alnus rubra). In addition to Alder, only a handful of other genera and species exhibit these rays: Hornbeam (Carpinus spp.), and some species of Sheoak (Allocasuarina and Casuarina spp.) and Oak (Quercus spp.) also feature aggregate rays.

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