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Need help squaring up cross cut sled.

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Forum topic by Hard_as_Wood posted 01-05-2016 04:15 PM 710 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Hard_as_Wood

19 posts in 408 days


01-05-2016 04:15 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I don’t know how this is possible.

I’m getting square to the right side of the kerf cut and way off square on the left side of the kerf cut.

see the pix

-- Ciao!


19 replies so far

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2326 posts in 1764 days


#1 posted 01-05-2016 04:30 PM

Your back ‘fence’ must be curved.

View Hard_as_Wood's profile

Hard_as_Wood

19 posts in 408 days


#2 posted 01-05-2016 04:35 PM

That is what I thought, but It’s hard maple and it looks straight, when I lay it flat there is no wobble or movement.

-- Ciao!

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

4859 posts in 2280 days


#3 posted 01-05-2016 05:05 PM

Put a high quality straightedge against the fence and look for gaps. That should end any debate about the fence being the culprit. Hardwood is not the best choice for jigs and fences. I prefer finish grade plywood with 9 or more layers for the best chance of keeping things straight and square. Wiping a shellac finish on both sides helps to keep jigs flat as well.

Good luck with it.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View Hard_as_Wood's profile

Hard_as_Wood

19 posts in 408 days


#4 posted 01-05-2016 05:12 PM

Yep, it’s the fence. Its a tad bit curved, I see it now.

There is a bit of light through the middle area but the square touches on the right side and the left side.

I’ll look into that finished grade ply.

-- Ciao!

View ThomasChippendale's profile

ThomasChippendale

244 posts in 399 days


#5 posted 01-05-2016 05:13 PM

If your fence is straight, then your square…is not square.

-- PJ

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

697 posts in 691 days


#6 posted 01-05-2016 05:20 PM

Even if you see a curve on a fence, you need a better square. Those kind are for construction type work and are notorious for not being perfectly square.

View Hard_as_Wood's profile

Hard_as_Wood

19 posts in 408 days


#7 posted 01-05-2016 05:26 PM

What square do you recommend?

-- Ciao!

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

697 posts in 691 days


#8 posted 01-05-2016 06:03 PM

I have some from Woodpecker, Incra and iGaging.
Starrett has a great reputation for adjustable squares but they’re not cheap

In the end, it’s worth the money because if you take care of them, you’ll be using them for a long time and will greatly improve your cuts and your assembly.

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2326 posts in 1764 days


#9 posted 01-05-2016 07:07 PM

Put one leg of your square against a STRAIGHT fence and draw a line against the edge that goes out at the 90. Now flip the square over and look to see if that leg aligns with the mark you just made. If it does your square is fine. We can’t all afford expensive machinist’s equipment.

View teejk02's profile

teejk02

424 posts in 592 days


#10 posted 01-05-2016 09:07 PM

I dunno…the majority of the cut is to the right side of the blade and that seems to be fine…I really never pay much attention to what happens on the left side but that’s just me.

View lateralus819's profile

lateralus819

2236 posts in 1356 days


#11 posted 01-05-2016 09:46 PM

Is the fence a lamination?

I glued mine with a piece of 8/4 as a caul to keep it flat.

View Hard_as_Wood's profile

Hard_as_Wood

19 posts in 408 days


#12 posted 01-05-2016 09:55 PM

no, its pure hard maple.

I glued the new one in, so far its measuring up a whole lot truer

I’m letting it glue overnight and then I’ll test it in the morning.

-- Ciao!

View clin's profile

clin

514 posts in 463 days


#13 posted 01-05-2016 10:03 PM

It certainly could be that the square is not square. But rather than use a square, try the 5-cut method for squaring the fence. You can get it square to a 0.05 deg or better doing this.

Just google “crosscut sled 5 cut” and you’ll get lots of examples of this.

Obviously in all cases you need your fence to be straight.

Alternatively you can use your square like dhazelton described to check it for square. But aside from checking, you can see how far it is off and use that to compensate.

I happen to have two framing squares. One is close to perfect, the other is off about 1/16 th inch over about 18” (0.2 deg).

-- Clin

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

6576 posts in 1617 days


#14 posted 01-05-2016 11:04 PM

In regards to the square, 2 points:

You can adjust that type of square if it isn’t actually square. Use a punch and a hammer on the face of the tool in the corner where the 2 legs meet. Punch the inside of the corner to make the legs separate, and punch the outside of the corner to close them.

Buying a nice square doesn’t have to be expensive and it doesn’t have to be a starrett.

http://www.harryepstein.com/index.php/tool-brand/products-engineering.html

US made, factory blemish squares. Only cosmetic issues, and they are 100% square. Shipping is typically pricey from them, but if you order a few things at once it’s not bad. I’ve got 2 squares from them.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View Parabola's profile

Parabola

9 posts in 344 days


#15 posted 01-05-2016 11:11 PM

If you haven’t already, spend 20 minutes and watch William Ng’s crosscut sled video with his 5-cut method. You won’t need to use a square for that – only a tape measure and a pair of calipers.

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