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Forum topic by 716 posted 01-04-2016 05:37 PM 559 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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716

502 posts in 380 days


01-04-2016 05:37 PM

I have a bench saw pictured below. It has a surprisingly good aligning fence for this kind of saws, It locks square each time. However it is of limited use mainly due to its size and the absence of any dust collection. There are dozens of these saws on craigslist so I do not hold my breath that I would be able to sell it for more than the blade it comes with.
Any ideas for a second life for this saw? An obvious choice is a disc sander as there are sand discs designed to be used on table saws. Too much dust though.
Anything else ?

-- It's nice!


13 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4224 posts in 1662 days


#1 posted 01-04-2016 05:43 PM

I have a similar type saw (plastic case, universal screamer motor C-man thing) that had a fried motor (surprise!). Turned it into a dedicated router table :)

But since yours is working, that might not be the best use.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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716

502 posts in 380 days


#2 posted 01-04-2016 07:09 PM

If yo mange to use the tilting mechanism in your router table that would open a whole new set of possibilities.

-- It's nice!

View conifur's profile

conifur

955 posts in 615 days


#3 posted 01-04-2016 07:28 PM

Possible a disc sander if you can get a 10”’ disc with a 5/8 arbor, but the rpm maybe to fast for that, not sure about that.

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7211 posts in 2839 days


#4 posted 01-04-2016 08:27 PM

Sanding discs don’t work out all that well running at TS speeds of 4K rpms, and tend to burn and glaze the sandpaper quickly. Most sanders run at a fraction of that speed. If you could gear it down it might work ok as a sander.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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716

502 posts in 380 days


#5 posted 01-04-2016 08:47 PM

The blade speed is actually 5300 rpm on these saws. However what do you think about combining the saw + sand disc with this:

-- It's nice!

View TheGreatJon's profile

TheGreatJon

295 posts in 697 days


#6 posted 01-04-2016 08:48 PM

I’m not sure what kind of projects you typically take on, but if you do lots of repetitive cuts it’s not a bad idea to keep it as a TS and just use it for dados or certain angled cuts or some other setup that takes time to change on your main saw.

-- This is not the signature line you are looking for.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4224 posts in 1662 days


#7 posted 01-04-2016 08:59 PM

I have never tried using one of those speed controls on the saw, but it is a brush type motor, so it may be possible. The problem is that you will have to run it considerably slower than it was designed for, so not only will the motors internal cooling fan be unable to push enough air to keep it cool, but you will also lose a lot of power/torque. Heat is what will tear those motors up (due to the plastic motor housing), and those things aren’t really all that powerful to begin with :)

I eventually did what Jon suggested.. I had originally turned mine into a dedicated router table, but I wound up running across an identical saw someone was giving away for free on CL. They had backed into it with their car and smashed up the stand and broke the plastic cabinet – but the saw ran fine. I swapped motors and now in addition to being used as a router table, I also use it as a dedicated cross cut saw (with a sled).

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Don W's profile

Don W

17962 posts in 2031 days


#8 posted 01-04-2016 09:14 PM

I put a metal cut off wheel in something similar. Of course I had a use for a metal cut off wheel at the time.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2324 posts in 1760 days


#9 posted 01-04-2016 09:45 PM

If you ever install flooring in a second floor you will be glad you have that. If you ever have to do a job at a friends or customers home you will be glad you have that. If you ever cut nasty dusty material that you don’t want around your main saw you will be glad you have that. I would take the legs off and put it up on the shelf.

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

2427 posts in 1872 days


#10 posted 01-05-2016 04:09 AM



If you ever install flooring in a second floor you will be glad you have that. If you ever have to do a job at a friends or customers home you will be glad you have that. If you ever cut nasty dusty material that you don t want around your main saw you will be glad you have that. I would take the legs off and put it up on the shelf.

- dhazelton

I use mine for such occasional away from the house projects. Also you can put the bade in backwards and cut vinyl siding without tearing it up. Had to make a special drawer to store it on its side to save space.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2187 posts in 1488 days


#11 posted 01-06-2016 01:54 AM

I would hesitate to use a light duty saw like that for dados. For one thing, the arbor is probably too short, plus you would have to make an appropriate insert, and inserts are problematic on that type of saw.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View FirehouseWoodworking's profile

FirehouseWoodworking

686 posts in 2736 days


#12 posted 01-06-2016 03:07 AM

I am in a similar situation with a small saw such as that one. I plan on turning it into a dedicated finger jointing saw. I will build a jig and dedicate a blade so that the only adjustment I need to make will be to the blade height, depending upon the material thickness.

I like finger joints for building strong boxes. Having a dedicated saw, the set up takes no time.

Haven’t started on the jig yet, but that’s the plan.

Cheers!

-- Dave; Lansing, Kansas

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7913 posts in 1843 days


#13 posted 01-06-2016 04:04 AM



dedicated finger jointing saw.
- FirehouseWoodworking

Whoa, I like that idea.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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