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Forum topic by Dave Owen posted 01-21-2010 06:33 PM 1263 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Dave Owen

253 posts in 2537 days


01-21-2010 06:33 PM

Topic tags/keywords: flexible shaft identify question

I was recently given a rather old flexible shaft. I’d like to know a bit about it before I use it (maximum speed, lubrication, etc.), but unfortunately the manufacturer’s name is not on it. Here is a general description. Overall length is about 42”, including the 6mm shaft at one end, and a Jacob’s “Multicraft” chuck at the other. The housing and molded plastic hand-grip are black, and the diameter of the housing is about 14mm. Other than the chuck information, the only other identifying mark is the word “ENGLAND” molded into the hand grip. If anyone can identify this tool – or otherwise provide useful general information about the use of flexible shafts, I would appreciate it.

-- Dave O.


4 replies so far

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rdlaurance

366 posts in 2810 days


#1 posted 01-21-2010 08:56 PM

Dave, It would be great if you could include a good picture of it….

I’ve worked with numerous flexible shafts over the years. As a general rule on lubrication, all that I ever did was to apply a few drops of light machine oil into the shaft on occasion (dependent on number of hours of use).

Maybe these links could also help about use, tips, tricks, etc. ....

http://www.ganoksin.com/borisat/nenam/flexible.htm
http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art35304.asp

Though they specialize in jewelry supplies, I’ve found a great source for bits, sanders, etc… here

http://www.riogrande.com/MemberArea/SearchPage.aspx?page=GRID&category%7ccategoryroot%7c112=Burs

and they also sell Foredom brand flex shafts and replacement parts, accessories.

http://www.riogrande.com/MemberArea/SearchPage.aspx?page=GRID&freetext|1264099756571=flexible%20shaft

-- Rick, south Sweden

View Dave Owen's profile

Dave Owen

253 posts in 2537 days


#2 posted 01-21-2010 10:41 PM

Thanks rdlaurance, it’s great you think photos might help. Perhaps they will help you or someone else recognize the manufacturer. As you can see from the pictures, I haven’t cleaned it up yet. In fact, I don’t even have a key with which to get the little sanding drum off.



After looking at the word “ENGLAND” more closely, it’s so poorly spaced I wonder if this might even be the name of a previous owner – rather than the Country.

By the way, I found all of your links interesting, although most did seem to deal with jewelry-making. My use for a flexible shaft would be for things like finish contouring of things like the band saw boxes I posted recently.

-- Dave O.

View rdlaurance's profile

rdlaurance

366 posts in 2810 days


#3 posted 01-23-2010 11:40 AM

Hi Dave…

The photos show a flex-shaft the likes of which I’ve never seen before. No idea if the ENGLAND is an owner, company name or country of manufacture. I didn’t find much either on a GOOGLE search.

With all the flex-shafts I’ve used to change the sanding drum, you just need to put a wrench on the nut at the base of the sanding drum and use a flat screwdriver on the screw located on the top of the drum. Once removed, this lessons the expanding pressure on the rubber core so the sanding drum can be slipped off or just peeled off and a new one slipped over the drum, followed by the small washer on top with the screw reinserted to expand the rubber core holding the drum. You’ve probably tried that or don’t have the screw that I described as this make could be different.

The chuck key to change the different bits is the more important aspect and for that, I’m at a loss of where to turn. Possibly you could figure out the size of teeth on the chuck gear and just hopefully a Jacobs chuck key (or Foredom) would work. A supplier of those brands could help in that regards.

Many hardware stores also sale Dremel accesories and these could work for tool bits. Foredom uses a chuck and key like a standard hand drill albeit smaller and can fit a variety of small sizes (great for small drill bits) plus many other sanding and grinding bits. I do jewelry and wood and use the bits on both, including on some softer stone, plastics and various other materials as well.

Hope this helps but it may be difficult to find all the info you need unless someone else can positively identify the manufacturer and they are still in business. Good Luck!

-- Rick, south Sweden

View Dave Owen's profile

Dave Owen

253 posts in 2537 days


#4 posted 01-23-2010 04:40 PM

Thanks for your efforts on my behalf, Rick. I’ll be looking for a chuck key for the Jacob’s chuck today. Wish I hadn’t thrown about four of them away a year or so ago. One might have fit. Since it has a rather heavy-duty look about it, I’m going to lubricate it a bit and assume it will handle the speed of my radial arm saw, and give it a try.

-- Dave O.

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