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Anyone Build a Thickness Sander?

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Forum topic by Scott posted 01-04-2016 01:57 AM 779 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Scott

58 posts in 822 days


01-04-2016 01:57 AM

I’ve been looking at different thickness sanders that people have built lately. It’s making me want to build one for my own. I was probably going to make a 30” sander. I’d use it to flatten and sand large panels. I’ve seen a lot of them that are manual fed. I’m thinking that a manual fed one would be fine because the sanding wheel is fixed and it wouldn’t cause any lower spots if you were a little inconsistent with feeding the stock. Has anyone built one? Or does anyone had any thoughts on a manual fed system?


10 replies so far

View HarveyM's profile

HarveyM

92 posts in 1489 days


#1 posted 01-04-2016 03:02 AM

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/46736
Fine Woodworking March/April 1980, issue 21
http://www.finewoodworking.com/fwnpdffree/FWW58.ShopbuiltThicknes%20Sander.54-57.pdf
Fine Woodworking Dec 1990, issue 85

-- Just a Duffer

View rick1955's profile

rick1955

258 posts in 897 days


#2 posted 01-04-2016 04:41 AM

https://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=diy+drum+sander&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8

I don’t understand why people don’t use search engines. There’s no new questions. Just new people asking old questions. I’ve been using the net for over 20 years and asked a question on a forum in the first week and the answers were so far off I just go to the answers.

Stroke sander are superior to drum sanders.
https://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=diy+stroke+sander&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8

-- Working smarter with less tools is a true crafts person...

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1775 days


#3 posted 01-04-2016 10:22 AM

O


https://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=diy+drum+sander&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8

I don t understand why people don t use search engines. There s no new questions. Just new people asking old questions. I ve been using the net for over 20 years and asked a question on a forum in the first week and the answers were so far off I just go to the answers.

Stroke sander are superior to drum sanders.
https://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=diy+stroke+sander&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8

- rick1955


I routinely make edge banding at my work place. Often time 400-500 LF at at time. Most of it is 1/4 thick and 3/4 wide. After it’s all riped (a little over sized) it goes through a thickness sander. It comes out sanded and to the correct thickness. All I have to do is stick the pieces in one end of the sander and walk around and catch it coming out the other end.

Please tell me how a stroke sander would be superior doing this?

“Why don’t people use the Internet”? Silly me, I thought this was the Internet. Often times when I use Google to do a search it take me to woodworking forums. Go figure.

One last question, with you view on “why people don’t use search engines” why do you bother to belong LJ’s

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Scott's profile

Scott

58 posts in 822 days


#4 posted 01-04-2016 12:21 PM

Sorry for upsetting you Rick but I did the searches you linked:


I ve been looking at different thickness sanders that people have built lately.

I’m a new woodworker. I do Google just about everything, but I take most of it with a grain of salt. Which is why I pose the questions on here. And no where did I find any one talking about manual feeding issues which I was most curious about.

View HarveyM's profile

HarveyM

92 posts in 1489 days


#5 posted 01-04-2016 12:45 PM

Scott, I replied after a long day, so I kept my reply short-
I think Paul (Tyka from the lumberjocks projects I posted) could probably give you the answers you want.

-- Just a Duffer

View ChrisK's profile

ChrisK

1809 posts in 2548 days


#6 posted 01-04-2016 01:01 PM

http://woodgears.ca/sander/thickness.html

I have seen both manual and self fed. I would think manual feed is fine. See the above link if you haven’t already.

Just love the stroke sander idea for controlled thickness sanding (Sarcasm here)

-- Chris K

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

394 posts in 685 days


#7 posted 01-04-2016 02:02 PM

im going to be starting a build myself and this is one of the writeups im following
http://www.sutherdyne.com/drumsander/

im thinkin it can be set up so at a later date an auto feed table can be added. we shall see.

View Zboom's profile

Zboom

72 posts in 1821 days


#8 posted 01-04-2016 02:54 PM

Never mind this a$$ hole….. That’s what forums are for is to ask questions whether its been asked a million times or not. Some people are just inherent a$$ holes and grumpy old men….


https://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=diy+drum+sander&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8

I don t understand why people don t use search engines. There s no new questions. Just new people asking old questions. I ve been using the net for over 20 years and asked a question on a forum in the first week and the answers were so far off I just go to the answers.

Stroke sander are superior to drum sanders.
https://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=diy+stroke+sander&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8

- rick1955


-- Michael, www.facebook.com/flatlandersww

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

829 posts in 689 days


#9 posted 01-04-2016 04:56 PM

As to the manual/power feed:

I have a Performax 16/32 with the usual power feed belt. Sometimes when sanding wider boards (wider board = more back force from the drum), the board will slip/stall unless I keep downward pressure to insure a constant feed rate. When this happened, inevitably there will be snipe left by the drum.

There are additional dimensions to surface sanding boards besides just the height of the drum. Feed faster or slower will slightly change the finished height. A lot of this change depends on the wood species, sanding grit, etc. but the effect is real. Some you can sand out afterwards with a ROS or by scraping, other times the snipe requires another careful pass under the drum.

Since you are considering a 30” drum (correct?), you will experience a bunch of back force even with very light cuts. I’d consider some method that allows for a smooth feed rate (either manual or power) versus just having a smooth table that allows you to ‘push’ the part through. One of the best manual feeds I have seen lately is
Spaltedcherry's version

The crank will give you leverage and consistency. You save the ‘big’ bucks over a power feed but adding one later would be simple.

Just my $0.02

View lew's profile

lew

11344 posts in 3222 days


#10 posted 01-05-2016 04:29 AM

Not as large as you are thinking of making but this is what I did. It is manual feed and I have learned to make consistent feeds.

http://lumberjocks.com/lew/blog/27660

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

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