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Crack in sitting bench- repair somehow or let it alone?

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Forum topic by ravensrock posted 01-03-2016 03:02 PM 1131 views 0 times favorited 36 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ravensrock

337 posts in 1110 days


01-03-2016 03:02 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question oak

I’m in the finishing stage of building a sitting bench for a family member. The bench itself is comprised of quarter sawn white oak- 7 boards in total to acquire the thickness. Here is a link to a post I submitted about the glue up including pics at that stage-

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/133082

I put a coat of Transtint dye in water on first followed by a coat of oil-based stain. They want a distressed look so my plan is to put some Sealcoat shellac on next, then gel stain, then several coats of Arm-R-Seal. Went down to check this morning to see if the stain is dry and saw this crack. It wasn’t there yesterday. It isn’t at one of the glue joints. I’m wondering what caused this and what, if any, repair I should try. It’s about 3 inches long or so and created a bit of a ridge so I’m thinking I need to at least sand it down some.

-- Dave, York, PA, WildSide Woodworking


36 replies so far

View conifur's profile

conifur

955 posts in 619 days


#1 posted 01-03-2016 03:29 PM

I have had that happen to me with QS WO, and it may get worse, only time will tell, I would fill it and sand it. I also would wait on doing that a few days and see if it gets longer b4 doing that.

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

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ravensrock

337 posts in 1110 days


#2 posted 01-03-2016 03:36 PM

Thanks for the reply. What would you use to fill it? I have Timbermate and Famowood. I’ve used sawdust and hide glue in the past also. Would some kind of epoxy help? Or can I somehow use this to add to the distressed look they want? Several ideas floating around in my head. Open to others’ thoughts!

-- Dave, York, PA, WildSide Woodworking

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2417 posts in 2389 days


#3 posted 01-03-2016 03:43 PM

Sanding powder (from an orbital sander) and hide glue is a good fix. In my experience hide glue is the only glue that will not show up very much over a finish. I have also used sanding powder and lacquer (Or what ever finish you are using) to fill a void like this.

-- "You may have your PHD but I have my GED and my DD 214"

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bearkatwood

1215 posts in 479 days


#4 posted 01-03-2016 03:49 PM

you could put in a dutchman joint and mimic it at all four corners to match.? If you are able to clamp it shut then some CA glue would do the trick. I like to wax around the joint before I use it, it helps with the clean up.

-- Brian Noel

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conifur

955 posts in 619 days


#5 posted 01-03-2016 04:35 PM

It could add to your look, you know what look you are looking for, I dont other then you said distressed, many interpretations of that.

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

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ravensrock

337 posts in 1110 days


#6 posted 01-03-2016 04:42 PM

conifur- The family member I’m building it for said “Distress it…bang it up a little.” This after I spent hours sanding it smooth. I’ve never distressed a project before and I hated doing it. Probably didn’t do it enough to his liking. I’m still considering this option.

bearkatwood- Not sure I could clamp it up but I thought some type of glue into the crack might stabilize it a bit. Still thinking about this option too.

I’m going to wait a day or so to do anything as was suggested earlier to see if it opens up any more.

-- Dave, York, PA, WildSide Woodworking

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a1Jim

115207 posts in 3045 days


#7 posted 01-03-2016 05:03 PM

My first thoughts are what caused it to crack? are there cleats on the bottom that are restricting wood movement? if so you have to element the problem before you repair the top. If you do have cleats that are restricting wood movement , Remove the cleats and what I would guess are screws and elongate the holes the screw are in ,in the cleat in the direction of wood movement. then repair it.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

528 posts in 909 days


#8 posted 01-03-2016 07:39 PM

I’ve done lots of distressed pieces—some were intentional.

Seriously, I would carve this into a V-notch, accenting the crack, then add some more, then put some dings, gouges, and and pin-holes in the piece. Add a dark glaze to emphasize the distressing. Way too pristine looking for a distressed look, IMHO

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2326 posts in 1764 days


#9 posted 01-03-2016 07:54 PM

As said above that looks like the wood shrank but wasn’t allowed to move. I looked at your link and would guess that the board directly under this one didn’t have the same moisture content at the time of glue up.

I’ve never seen anyone make up a panel the way you did, and don’t know if you will have more issues with it or not, but filling it with an epoxy is all I could come up.

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ravensrock

337 posts in 1110 days


#10 posted 01-03-2016 07:56 PM

a1Jim- There are no cleats on the bottom. It’s 3 boards glued together on top, 4 glued together on the bottom (to stagger the joints for some reason) and then those two face glued up. You can see what I did in the post I linked to above. As can be seen in the one picture, the crack is on the inside corner of one of the top pieces angling toward the glue line. It seems to follow along the grain. Any other thoughts about the cause?

jerryminer- I was already planning on a dark walnut glaze. There are some gouges, dings, etc that I think will show up more once the glaze is on. But probably should beat it up some more. I thought too of making it a v-notch to accent it. Just didn’t want the crack to get bigger if I did that.

-- Dave, York, PA, WildSide Woodworking

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a1Jim

115207 posts in 3045 days


#11 posted 01-03-2016 07:59 PM

Ravensrock
it’s possible it’s just wood being wood,did you check the moisture content before the glue?

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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ravensrock

337 posts in 1110 days


#12 posted 01-03-2016 08:02 PM

Didn’t check the moisture content. I get it from a local guy who says it has been air-dried for over 3 years.

-- Dave, York, PA, WildSide Woodworking

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a1Jim

115207 posts in 3045 days


#13 posted 01-03-2016 08:08 PM

That doesn’t always mean it’s dry enough to build with,air drying usually gets wood in the 16-20% where the 8-12% range is preferred.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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jerryminer

528 posts in 909 days


#14 posted 01-03-2016 08:13 PM

That looks like a stress-relief (aka “wood being wood”) crack. It might grow as it dries out some more. V-groove accenting will help it look like it belongs there. I still think you’re being too timid about your distressing. Edges are too clean, IMHO.

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ravensrock

337 posts in 1110 days


#15 posted 01-03-2016 08:20 PM

I’m sure you’re right jerry. Just not in my nature to intentionally beat up a pretty piece of wood. But I guess I should give them what they’re looking for and not what I would want in my own home.

Would a butterfly key be of any benefit here as someone else suggested earlier? Never did one before but have been wanting to at some point.

-- Dave, York, PA, WildSide Woodworking

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