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Forum topic by The__Dude posted 01-02-2016 10:34 PM 1537 views 0 times favorited 36 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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The__Dude

125 posts in 529 days


01-02-2016 10:34 PM

Topic tags/keywords: miter work bench plywood pocket

I have limited room in my shop area, so I wanted to build a work bench that can hold a miter saw.

I came across some cheap 3/4” plywood, so that is what I will frame it with.
I used 2×4s to create a base.
It will have 2 foot wide compartments underneath. Probably add shelves.

Any suggestions on attaching the 3/4” plywood to the 2×4? and to each other.
Should I pocket screw all of these?


36 replies so far

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haskins

130 posts in 704 days


#1 posted 01-03-2016 09:02 AM

glue and pocket hole screws would most likely hold it but you may want to think about putting some strips or triangles in the corners for a stronger joint.

-- father son woodworks

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dhazelton

2326 posts in 1763 days


#2 posted 01-03-2016 02:43 PM

It’s a shop cabinet, not fine furniture. I wouldn’t waste the pricy Kreg screws and I would just use glue and drywall screws, (predrilled near any edges). Put a back on the cabinet to keep it square.

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The__Dude

125 posts in 529 days


#3 posted 01-03-2016 03:13 PM

I didn’t want to waste wood with a back on the cabinet.
I do have some 3/4” plywood strips from ripping the sides.
They are 6” wide strips.
I can add some of those.

I could screw and drill the sides into the base.
Then screw the base into the 2×4’s

I have been reading on making cabinet carcass, and it seems I am doing this backwards!

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The__Dude

125 posts in 529 days


#4 posted 01-03-2016 03:14 PM

I am planning on 3/4” plywood for the top and adding melamine to it.

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The__Dude

125 posts in 529 days


#5 posted 01-03-2016 10:03 PM

I worked some more on it.
Top support board is for the top
Bottom/middle board will support the full plywood shelf.
One shelf in each box/hole

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The__Dude

125 posts in 529 days


#6 posted 01-03-2016 10:06 PM

I did not screw of glue to saw portion yet.
But something I did not think about is the swing of the saw.
If I mount towards the center of the table, then I cannot swing it 45 degrees.

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The__Dude

125 posts in 529 days


#7 posted 01-03-2016 10:08 PM

If I have it pulled forward it works fine, but the handle would stick out for storage.

So I think I will make a stop block and slide the saw up to the block when I want to use it.
Then slide back when I am done for the day.

Or I cut handle clearance in the sides? But that does not seem like a good idea.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2198 posts in 947 days


#8 posted 01-03-2016 10:18 PM

just butt screw the sides into the bottom like standard cab construction.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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dhazelton

2326 posts in 1763 days


#9 posted 01-03-2016 10:28 PM

It looks like you can just pull the saw forward and have clearance, but if you plan on upgrading to a slider with more depth of cut you may not be able to do that.

You can also have your saw shelf flush with the bench top and just make some supports to hold your lumber as you cut it.

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The__Dude

125 posts in 529 days


#10 posted 01-03-2016 11:20 PM

I thought about the supports ontop of the cabinet, Not sure I want to do that.
I like the idea of sliding the saw forward to a fixed stop.

I have about 1” of clearance I need to shim to make it level with the future top.

I don’t see myself ever getting a sliding saw, and if I did it would be that compact bosch.
The bench is 36” deep.

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dhazelton

2326 posts in 1763 days


#11 posted 01-04-2016 01:53 PM

....or push it back to where you want and cut a notch out of each side panel to clear the lever. As long as you can see the scale you’re good. If you plan on screwing a fence down to your outfeeds that will give you the most usable space on the counter for other things.

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The__Dude

125 posts in 529 days


#12 posted 01-05-2016 02:38 AM

If I have a fence it would be removable.
Was thinking of installing track in the top of the table.
Table needs to be able to be converted to an assembly bench, as I am out of room in the shop.

I was looking and I don’t have enough cheap 3/4” plywood for the top.
Was looking at the store today for something smooth and level.
Might go with MDF for the top? And a cover over it?

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The__Dude

125 posts in 529 days


#13 posted 01-05-2016 02:10 PM

I have been using the wrong term for the top I want.
It is tempered hardboard.

So maybe a sheet of 3/4” plywood, then 1/4” tempered hardboard.
Not sure how to finish the edge face. I can use some wood for it.
But I don’t own a router. So something I can cut with my table saw.

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dhazelton

2326 posts in 1763 days


#14 posted 01-05-2016 03:29 PM

That would be fine, when the 1/4 layer gets beat up down the road it’s easily replaced. I’d just grab some cheap 1×2 pine strips for the edge or rip some pine down.

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The__Dude

125 posts in 529 days


#15 posted 01-08-2016 03:07 AM

Are there different grades or standards for tempered hardboard?

And will plywood be straight enough for a top?

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