LumberJocks

I have a Delta 34-444 Table saw and am thinking of changing the

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by ohtimberwolf posted 12-27-2015 11:28 PM 1180 views 0 times favorited 23 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View ohtimberwolf's profile

ohtimberwolf

634 posts in 1818 days


12-27-2015 11:28 PM

Topic tags/keywords: delta 34-444

Motor to 240v. The manual says it can be wired for 120 or 240 but no diagram to do so. My question is has anyone done this with this saw and if so do you have a diagram for it? Also would there be any advantage to doing that?
larry

-- Just a barn cat, now gone to cat heaven.


23 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

4234 posts in 1665 days


#1 posted 12-27-2015 11:30 PM

Wiring diagram should be on the motor, not the manual. Post a picture of the motor data plate/wiring diagram. If the data plate doesn’t show it, sometimes they will be inside the motors wiring junction box. Three really isn’t any advantage to converting it over though, unless you are pushing the capacity of your 120v circuit. Will produce the same amount of power regardless of being wired for 120 or 240.

Edit: Ohhh… I forgot about those saws… you MAY get a increase in HP… post a picture of the data plate to verify. Some were shipped de-rated at 120v, and would bump up from 1.5hp@120v to 2hp on 240.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7216 posts in 2841 days


#2 posted 12-28-2015 12:26 AM

The advantage is that 220v tends to not use as much of it’s potential amperage capacity because there are two hot leads sharing the amperage, so it tends to have less voltage loss, which can result in faster start ups and faster recovery from bogging. No two circuits are alike, so the actual result can be hard to predict. If you have 220v readily available, there’s really no downside, and sometimes there’s a benefit, so I’d do it.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View WhyMe's profile

WhyMe

615 posts in 1027 days


#3 posted 12-28-2015 12:41 AM

Unless you have an available 240V circuit to plug the saw to I wouldn’t bother. Gains if any are slim to none.

View ohtimberwolf's profile

ohtimberwolf

634 posts in 1818 days


#4 posted 12-28-2015 02:32 AM

I do have 240 available and would not be hard to do that. I will try to get a photo of the motor and plate tomorrow and post it here for those interested in it. Thanks to all…now, to bed. larry

-- Just a barn cat, now gone to cat heaven.

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

4234 posts in 1665 days


#5 posted 12-28-2015 04:06 AM

Here is what one of the de-rated motor plates look like:

Notice the HP lists two different values, 1-1/2 for 120v (low voltage) and 2 for 240v (high voltage). Wiring for either voltage is shown at the bottom. If yours is the same, then it would be worthwhile to wire for 240v to get the extra HP.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Sparks64's profile

Sparks64

7 posts in 352 days


#6 posted 12-28-2015 06:43 AM

As an Electrician for many years now. new to Lumberjocks, and forums so please excuse any typos.
AS MrUnix posted you prob will find diagram inside motor make-up area.
If not please post a description of how many wires/colors/and #’s tagged on wires/connections, and possibly a photo of the inside of the make-up area. We can go forward from there.
I will see what i can find out online before I go to bed.
I will be back on the site in the morning.
PS. There are advantages to going to 240V, I can discuss them later.

-- Sparks64,Oregon

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3945 posts in 1959 days


#7 posted 12-28-2015 12:09 PM

As it was explained to me (by a former Delta tech) the motor is 2 HP no matter which voltage you use, but UL would not list it until Delta de-rated it for 120V use. Regardless, I changed mine to 240V following the diagram on the motor….as I recall it wasn’t very hard to do at all. I don’t remember (this was over 20 years ago) what, if anything, needed to be done to the switch. It was a worthwhile change, since the amperage draw on 120V would dim the lights in my then garage shop…the 240V change changed that.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View ohtimberwolf's profile

ohtimberwolf

634 posts in 1818 days


#8 posted 12-28-2015 02:35 PM

Here is the label on the motor. It does not have a 2 on it. larry

-- Just a barn cat, now gone to cat heaven.

View eflanders's profile

eflanders

87 posts in 1316 days


#9 posted 12-28-2015 03:00 PM

You can get a replacement owners manual online. In it, it will give you the correct wiring connections. It is a worthwhile change as your motor is likely to last longer and run more energy efficient. Unfortunately due to multiple variables it is hard to calculate the actual savings. But most motors draw about 1/2 the starting amperage when wired at the higher voltage.

View eflanders's profile

eflanders

87 posts in 1316 days


#10 posted 12-28-2015 03:24 PM

You can get a replacement owners manual online. In it, it will give you the correct wiring connections. It is a worthwhile change as your motor is likely to last longer and run more energy efficient. Unfortunately due to multiple variables it is hard to calculate the actual savings. But most motors draw about 1/2 the starting amperage when wired at the higher voltage.

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

4234 posts in 1665 days


#11 posted 12-28-2015 03:46 PM

You can get a replacement owners manual online. In it, it will give you the correct wiring connections.

I’ve never seen a Delta manual with motor wiring diagrams yet. They are on the motor data plate (as shown above). For the motor in question, there will be very little difference noticed between 120/240 operation (if any), and it will remain a 1.5HP motor either way.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3945 posts in 1959 days


#12 posted 12-28-2015 04:15 PM


For the motor in question, there will be very little difference noticed between 120/240 operation (if any), and it will remain a 1.5HP motor either way.

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

Yeah, that’s the motor I had on mine…but the voltage change should still be fairly simple.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

4234 posts in 1665 days


#13 posted 12-28-2015 05:31 PM

Yeah, that s the motor I had on mine…but the voltage change should still be fairly simple.
- Fred Hargis

Pretty trivial actually… swap two wires in the motor junction box and put a new plug on the end of the cord! Shouldn’t need to do anything with the on/off switch, the motor has built in overload protection, and the existing machine wiring is sufficient for 120v, so it’s more than capable of handling 240v.

To change voltage, you just need to move the brown wire from #2 to #6, and the blue wire from #4 to #2. Then slap a new plug on the end of the cord and you are done.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Sparks64's profile

Sparks64

7 posts in 352 days


#14 posted 12-28-2015 05:46 PM

As posted above, the voltage change should be simple, I do recommend that you install a dedicated 20A circuit, NEMA 6-20 t-slot plug and cord cap.
What I’ve read so far says there is no rewiring of the switch, post if you have issues.
Smoother start, less bog under load, motor life, and balance of amperage to your panel are some of the advantages to doing this.
Good Travels

-- Sparks64,Oregon

View ohtimberwolf's profile

ohtimberwolf

634 posts in 1818 days


#15 posted 12-28-2015 06:34 PM

Thanks to you all for such a nice to the point group of answers. Thanks also Brad for saving me the time to see how the wiring should go. I have dedicated wiring so just for even the small improvements I think I will go ahead and do the change. Again thanks a lot to all of you and have a great 2016! larry

-- Just a barn cat, now gone to cat heaven.

showing 1 through 15 of 23 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com