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THIRD Grizzly 1023. Same problem as first!! Video

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Forum topic by Mvg2 posted 12-27-2015 01:23 AM 1731 views 0 times favorited 35 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Mvg2

19 posts in 846 days


12-27-2015 01:23 AM

Almost 3 months and 3 1023rl’s later, I’m still having the same infuriating alignment issues. As the video shows (hopefully I got it to work right!) while raising/lowering the blade, it does not travel perpendicular to the table.

I have tried multiple blades, different spots on the blade, adjusted the gibs, and everything else under the sun to eliminate the deviation while raising and lowering the blade. I measured the same thing on my ol delta contractor and found practically no run out. I have discussed this issue with the grizzly techs ad nauseum and they agree there should be no alignment issues. They assured me that this saw will be looked over to ensure no problems. That was a lie…

I’m scratching my head with this one. Anyone out there have the same issues? Do I live with it? Is it acceptable? If it’s going back again, I’m completely through with the company… Ahh!

Video
Can’t get the video to work. Here’s the link http://youtu.be/p5H_4Y754Bg

[yt]p5H_4Y754Bg[/yt]


35 replies so far

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

693 posts in 684 days


#1 posted 12-27-2015 01:28 AM

This is the first I’ve heard about this issue with this model. I would be pulling my hair out and not sure I would be on the 3rd machine. After the second I’d be throwing in the towel.

View Paul's profile

Paul

721 posts in 1025 days


#2 posted 12-27-2015 01:29 AM

Video is set to private.

Paul

View Mvg2's profile

Mvg2

19 posts in 846 days


#3 posted 12-27-2015 03:01 AM

with all the shipping and the sheer amount of time I have lost, I am beyond pulling my hair out. They assured me they checked the last saw out prior to shipping. Low and behold, same problem!

Just to make sure, any deviation while raising/lowering is unnacceptable, right?

I do encourage anyone who has purchased a 1023rl to make sure the blade travels in one plane while raising/lowering.

Hey Paul, video is now set to public. still have no clue how to embed a youtube

Thanks!
-Mike

View lateralus819's profile

lateralus819

2236 posts in 1349 days


#4 posted 12-27-2015 03:13 AM

I’d be pretty pissed even on the first one. Let alone 3.

I’d get money money back and go elsewhere. Clearly they can’t get their stuff together.

View Paul's profile

Paul

721 posts in 1025 days


#5 posted 12-27-2015 03:28 AM

I haven’t heard of this problem from any 1023 but this would not be acceptable to me. Sorry to hear your having such a difficult time with Grizz, I’ve always had good luck with them.

Paul

View pjones46's profile

pjones46

986 posts in 2103 days


#6 posted 12-27-2015 03:30 AM

Have you tried laying a straightedge across the diameter of the blade to determine if it is hollow ground which would affect the run out as the blade as it is raised and lowered? Also check the run out at different heights on the blade while hand spinning the blade in a 360 rotation.

-- Respectfully, Paul

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johnstoneb

2143 posts in 1632 days


#7 posted 12-27-2015 03:52 AM

Your checking flatness of the blade. You need a truly flat test plate in place of the blade to do what you are doing. You can have .010 difference in thickness of paint.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4203 posts in 1659 days


#8 posted 12-27-2015 03:55 AM

Logically, the only way the arbor could behave like that is for the arbor bracket pivot shaft to be out of parallel with the table top, bent or the arbor bracket bored out of square. Here is the associated bits for reference:

And if that were the case, the lateral deflection would not be linear as it appears to be in your video. That would also seem highly unusual, particularly across three different machines (and one that Grizzly said was checked and verified before shipment). The only other logical reason for the behaviour shown is that the blade is not perfectly square to the table, which is more likely (and the lateral deflection would be linear as shown in the video).

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Mvg2's profile

Mvg2

19 posts in 846 days


#9 posted 12-27-2015 04:03 AM

thanks for all the comments and suggestions!

that’s what has me doubting my method. The fact that it happened to all three is extremely suspect and leaves me as the variable :) However, i did use same square and the same blade, on my contractor saw and i got 0.003” runout.

I have conducted this measuremt an exhasting and obsessed amount of times on the saw. I tried every blade angle possible to see if it countered the deviation. it does not. One rotation of the handle repeatedly yeilds a 0.001” deviation and returns to 0.000 when brought back to the starting position. Because of this I dont think it’s the blade…

The only thing that helps defeat the deviation is if i put upward pressure on the motor while raising/lowering. I can minimize the amount of runout thi way. Because of this, I wander if the gibs (motor runs up and down on) were machined incorrectly?

Has anyone run into something like this before?

View MadMark's profile

MadMark

976 posts in 913 days


#10 posted 12-27-2015 05:21 AM

You’re seriously complaining about .001” that only shows when you’re adjusting the blade? Its not the saw, its you. Does this issue have any effect at all while cutting? No? Then what difference does it make?

-- Madmark - Madmark2150@yahoo.com Wiretreefarm.com

View Mvg2's profile

Mvg2

19 posts in 846 days


#11 posted 12-27-2015 05:32 AM

Wonder where the inspiration came from for that user name ;) did you watch the video? For each revolution of the wheel a .001 deviation occurred. Not sure whether your saw can fully raise and lower the blade with one revolution, but this grizzly takes over 20 revolutions from a 1/4 inch height to full height. You do the math.

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MadMark

976 posts in 913 days


#12 posted 12-27-2015 05:36 AM

Ok, its .020”. Does that throw your work off? Is that enough math?

-- Madmark - Madmark2150@yahoo.com Wiretreefarm.com

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

2850 posts in 2691 days


#13 posted 12-27-2015 05:52 AM

Nothing i have built using my 1023 has been screwey from the cuts so I guess I am OK.

On the other hand, maybe I am not quiet as picky about tolerances. Heck, I have hard enough time making accurate measurements, let alone cutting them on the saw, so we make a pretty good pair! :-)

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View Mvg2's profile

Mvg2

19 posts in 846 days


#14 posted 12-27-2015 05:58 AM

I don’t yet. That’s a question that’s been irritating me as well. I’m a little torn about running it until something is resolved. On one hand, when I buy a machine I expect it to fall within appropriate tolerances, which this not. With a square to the blade, when raising and lowering it, I can watch the blade push the square out.

But is it enough to make a discernible difference in the squareness of the cut? Should I have to think about that with a new saw?

Johnstoneb: are you saying that this is a moot test then? Just looking for some suggestions and what is acceptable.

Thanks guys
-Mike

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4203 posts in 1659 days


#15 posted 12-27-2015 06:17 AM

With a square to the blade, when raising and lowering it, I can watch the blade push the square out.

Which points more to you not having the blade set square to the table than anything else IMO. Have you tried with a different square? How about this… try setting the blade angle so it registers zero (or as close as you can get it) run-out when raised/lowered, then check the blade with the square, or two.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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