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Forum topic by GravelySteve posted 12-27-2015 01:22 AM 484 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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GravelySteve

2 posts in 345 days


12-27-2015 01:22 AM

Hi all,
I am brand new to lumberjocks and consider myself a very amateur woodworker. I love the older, mostly pre-70’s tools. I recently purchased a Craftsman 103.23320 jointer. It is in good shape, and except for some surface rust on the tables, it mostly just needs lubrication to loosen things up. While I was checking it out, before buying, we had the motor running (it was not attached) and it seemed to run well with very little noise. After about 5 minutes, it began to smoke slightly and suddenly began to throw sparks from inside. We shut it down. I noticed afterwards I could barely turn the motor shaft by hand whereas before, it turned smoothly. Considering that, the owner dropped the price to $30 and I brought the jointer home. The motor is a Craftsman, 3/4 HP capacitor motor, ball bearing, 3450 RPM, 115 volts, 60 cycle, 9.3 amps. What are my options with this motor? It looks like the original motor so I would like to restore but I am also on a limited budget. Any advice you can provide would be greatly appreciated.

-- Steve


4 replies so far

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MrUnix

4220 posts in 1662 days


#1 posted 12-27-2015 07:03 AM

After about 5 minutes, it began to smoke slightly and suddenly began to throw sparks from inside. We shut it down. I noticed afterwards I could barely turn the motor shaft by hand whereas before, it turned smoothly. [...] What are my options with this motor?
- Steve

Options? Fix or replace :)

If it was still running (even if shooting sparks), then you can probably get it back in shape. But you are going to have to open it up. If the motor sat for a longish period of time, given it’s age, then the bearings were most likely already trash, and running like you did made them tear themselves up from lack of lubrication. Hopefully all you will need is to give it a good cleaning and a couple of new bearings, which should set you back about $10.

This is why it’s a good idea to replace bearings on any newly purchased used machinery – before ever using it.. even if the bearings look/feel good, you never know what use/abuse they have seen and it’s cheap insurance (to prevent having to spend a LOT more later).

Cheers,
Brad

PS: You may want to consider replacing the cutter head bearings as well… if the motor bearings were toast, then the cutter head bearings can’t be too far behind.

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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GravelySteve

2 posts in 345 days


#2 posted 12-27-2015 10:19 AM

Brad, thank you so much. I was concerned I bought a dud and it would be expensive to fix or replace that motor. I will go ahead and replace the cutter head bearings while I am at it. Is there a good source for both bearings online? I’m sure I will have lots of other questions as I go thru this tool. Thanks for the advice.

-- Steve

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3935 posts in 1956 days


#3 posted 12-27-2015 12:38 PM

A place that is used a lot by the OWWM guys is Accurate Bearing. They (Accurate) do ask that you be on top of what you need when you call, that would be the deatils of the bearings required (you might be able to read the bearing spec on the side of it). After that, and maybe an easier choice, would be any local bearing supplier…look under “power transmission equipment” or even an electric motor shop; given how cheap bearings are, this might work better…you can just carry the old ones in and get the proper replacements.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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MrUnix

4220 posts in 1662 days


#4 posted 12-27-2015 04:04 PM

I use Accurate Bearing pretty much exclusively.. they have quality bearings and great prices. Once you get the bearings out of the motor, check the numbers on the side and if you have callipers, measure the OD, bore and width just to verify what you have. The cutter head bearings (#18211), according to the manual, should be 6202LL-5/8 (you will need two). They are standard 6202 sealed bearings, but with a 5/8” bore (15.870mm) instead of the normal 15mm.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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