LumberJocks

Uneven jointer cut

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by giser3546 posted 12-27-2015 12:30 AM 765 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View giser3546's profile

giser3546

179 posts in 933 days


12-27-2015 12:30 AM

Just got a 6” delta jointer not long ago. I’ve set the out feed table to be about 0.002” lower than the blades per a tutorial on line but for some reason I am getting a much heavier cut at the start of my stroke than at the end. Any suggestions on whats happening here?

-- "If you wait for it to rain, It will"


12 replies so far

View Sarit's profile

Sarit

514 posts in 2601 days


#1 posted 12-27-2015 01:03 AM

Are you sure the tables are parallel? Use a quality straight edge to verify that the infeed table is parallel at the cutting depth you want. For instance you can rotate the cutterhead so it won’t touch your straightedge, then clamp the straightedge to the outfeed table such that it hovers over the cutterhead and infeed table. Now adjust the infeed to depth of cut you were making (say 1/16”) and use the same sized drill bit as a feeler gauge to confirm that the infeed is parallel to the outfeed. If you’re getting a heavier cut at the beginning I would suspect that the gap towards the cutterhead will be bigger than the one at the end.

Are you using bowed wood and placing the wood belly up?

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5764 posts in 947 days


#2 posted 12-27-2015 01:17 AM

Sounds like your outfeed is too high.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3019 posts in 1259 days


#3 posted 12-27-2015 01:19 AM

Any chance your out feed table is slightly above blade height?

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View giser3546's profile

giser3546

179 posts in 933 days


#4 posted 12-27-2015 01:29 AM

My blades are 0.002” above my outfeed table. I have checked the tables and they seem in alignment. While checking that I looked around and don’t see any way to fix that if it were off. How would that be fixed if it were an issue?

-- "If you wait for it to rain, It will"

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5764 posts in 947 days


#5 posted 12-27-2015 01:34 AM

Are the cuts concave or convex?

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View giser3546's profile

giser3546

179 posts in 933 days


#6 posted 12-27-2015 02:42 AM

The cuts are very slightly convex but by the time I’ve gotten to that point I’ve removed significantly more material on one end compared to the other.

-- "If you wait for it to rain, It will"

View teejk02's profile

teejk02

423 posts in 586 days


#7 posted 12-27-2015 02:25 PM

Might be in your technique? Are you putting excessive pressure near the cutting head instead of concentrating on keeping the piece flat on the infeed table (those rubber backed push pads are my friend)? Now a different question…you say Delta 6”. Are talking about something akin to the DJ15 or is it one of those benchtop things. If the former, there are some very good explanations on “tuning” (a very entertaining one is http://wiki.vintagemachinery.org/JointerTuning.ashx). If the latter, then I’ll say I owned one and will say that it was very good at making tapered boards…just the nature of the machine I guess. I made it work by alternating the board.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1770 days


#8 posted 12-27-2015 10:46 PM

Read through this. Check everything they suggest. If you still have problems then it could very well be technique.

http://www.newwoodworker.com/jntrprobfxs.html

This article suggest for convex cuts that one or both of the tables could be a tad high on the outboard ends.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View ThomasChippendale's profile

ThomasChippendale

244 posts in 393 days


#9 posted 12-27-2015 10:53 PM



I have checked the tables and they seem in alignment.

- giser3546

Did you actually take a straightedge and clamped it the outfield table and measured with a precise tool the height of the infeed table at both ends from the straightedge?

-- PJ

View Nubsnstubs's profile (online now)

Nubsnstubs

826 posts in 1191 days


#10 posted 12-27-2015 11:52 PM

You won’t find anything straighter than a tight string, so, get some string line/dry line/whatever, stuff used in construction and use a squeeze clamp at the out feed end. Bring up the infeed table until it zeros out. Check to see if you’re hitting anywhere you shouldn’t be. If it does or doesn’t hit, adjust both tables and knives until everything is right where it’s supposed to be. Even all the way across the tables and knives gives you a good flat and straight cut.

Now that said, the problem you are having is why I do not take my boards to the jointer after they are saw cut. I use it only before ripping my wood pieces, and they are 99% of the time cut to about 1” longer than the finish length. Shorter pieces run through the jointer gives you less noticeable problems…...... Good luck, Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson)

View giser3546's profile

giser3546

179 posts in 933 days


#11 posted 12-28-2015 12:34 AM

Thanks guys I have a few things to check now. I’ll see how it goes.

-- "If you wait for it to rain, It will"

View ThomasChippendale's profile

ThomasChippendale

244 posts in 393 days


#12 posted 12-28-2015 01:01 AM

The string is a good trick, make sure its well tensionned so it does not dip in the middle. Actually any string will dip in the middle but it probably does not matter for the accuracy we are looking for. A steel wire for hanging paintings on the wall is probably your best bet.

-- PJ

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com