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Forum topic by MrRon posted 12-26-2015 08:10 PM 780 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MrRon

3927 posts in 2710 days


12-26-2015 08:10 PM

Topic tags/keywords: tablesaw

I have cut aluminum on my table saw using a combination blade with no problems. I now want to do a large amount of aluminum cutting and wonder if a combination blade will hold up for such a purpose, or would it be better to buy a dedicated aluminum cutting blade.

P.S. I have to use a table saw. A band saw won’t do what I need done as the cuts to be made are grooving cuts on long lengths of aluminum.


15 replies so far

View Bluepine38's profile

Bluepine38

3341 posts in 2552 days


#1 posted 12-26-2015 08:33 PM

I have a Delta Homecraft 8”table saw Model 34-500 that I have put a steel cutting blade on and also use
it for aluminum. I tend to try to use tools for the purpose they were built for, or adapt them as much as
I possibly can for a different purpose. My thought was that while a wood cutting blade would cut
aluminum, it would tend to dull faster than a metal cutting blade and leave a rougher cut, which I would
have to smooth by hand. While cutting aluminum will probably not create sparks, it will create hot pieces
of metal, so be sure to clean all the sawdust out of your table saw before cutting metal.

-- As ever, Gus-the 77 yr young apprentice carpenter

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

4241 posts in 1665 days


#2 posted 12-26-2015 08:45 PM

Kind of depends on how thick of stuff you are cutting… I’ve had good success cutting sheet aluminium on the TS with a cheap combo blade, but I also run the motor slower than full (by about 50%) speed which helps.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2326 posts in 1763 days


#3 posted 12-26-2015 08:56 PM

When you say ‘grooving cuts’ you mean you’re just doing kerfs that don’t go all the way through the metal? If it was me and I loved my table saw I would get a cheapie used saw to dedicate to the aluminum. You see $25 – 50 Sears table saws all day long.

View rick1955's profile

rick1955

258 posts in 897 days


#4 posted 12-26-2015 11:00 PM

I’ve been cutting metal for 30 years. Buy a good nonferrous blade. That’s the way to go. I completely disagree with cheap junk blade practice. I was a professional metalsmith and did cuts you couldn’t believe. Brass, zinc, Aluinum. Even routed them.

-- Working smarter with less tools is a true crafts person...

View conifur's profile

conifur

955 posts in 618 days


#5 posted 12-26-2015 11:23 PM

—Brad in FL – To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid,
No you dont, first young, and watch your young friends be stupid and learn from THERE stupidity!!

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2326 posts in 1763 days


#6 posted 12-26-2015 11:33 PM

@Rick1955 – but yours was a dedicated metal cutting saw? You didn’t switch back and forth to wood, did you? My concern would be metal chips messing with the belt or trunnion. or getting into the motor.

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11806 posts in 3154 days


#7 posted 12-27-2015 12:00 AM

A shop I worked at used to cut thick Aluminum with a standard carbide tipped blade , using wax as a lubricant / cleaner to prevent the aluminum from building up on the teeth. They just touched the blade’s teeth between cuts with the block of wax.

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View rick1955's profile

rick1955

258 posts in 897 days


#8 posted 12-27-2015 12:07 AM

Same saw. One was my PM 66, the other was a Delta contractor saw. No issues with belts or trunnions. The motors were TEFC. On the router table I put a cotton cover over the vents to keep metal chips out. I could switch between wood and metal as soon as I changed from a nonferrous blade and a wood blade. Used the same router bits on both. I speak from experience, not speculation. Sounds like you folks didn’t know of nonferrous blades. They do make nonferrous router bits
.http://www.carbideprocessors.com/saw-blades/saw-blades-by-material/saw-blades-for-non-ferrous-metals/
http://www.toolstoday.com/t-Aluminum_Cutting_Router_Bits_and_Saw_Blades.aspx?source=adwordsCtools1dayGaluminumblades888aluminumcuttingLP100422&gclid=CjwKEAiAkvmzBRDQpozmt-uluCQSJACvCd1lW_hhis_vsCw0bX_8T-cKPPigHPoXoDW1Zlwhvg-w9RoCOArw_wcB

-- Working smarter with less tools is a true crafts person...

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

651 posts in 407 days


#9 posted 12-27-2015 12:14 AM

Chop saw. Sliding chop saw if you have one. Any blade will do. Use wood back and bottom for clean cuts. Blade will be fine.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn :)

View rick1955's profile

rick1955

258 posts in 897 days


#10 posted 12-27-2015 12:32 AM

http://www.carbideprocessors.com/pages/saw-blades/saw-tip-angles.html
Negative hook blades are the proper blades on these saws.
Lots of bad and dangerous advice on the internet. Go directly to the manufacturers for advice, not general public forums.

-- Working smarter with less tools is a true crafts person...

View Sarit's profile

Sarit

514 posts in 2606 days


#11 posted 12-27-2015 12:43 AM

I use a freud triple chip grind blade with a negative hook when I want to cut a lot of aluminum but you can do it with any carbide tipped blade as long as you go slow. The negative hook is more for safety I think. Keeps you from feeding too fast.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5765 posts in 952 days


#12 posted 12-27-2015 01:16 AM

In other words. Never try anything yourself. Have someone hand it to you.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View REO's profile

REO

889 posts in 1540 days


#13 posted 12-27-2015 04:44 AM

most any carbide tipped blade will do. On a standard hook the gullets tend to fill up if you cut to fast. aluminum blades are usually ground negative rake. some cms blades are made that way as well. WD49 works great for a lubricant. most quality saw motors are tefc so the chips don’t get into the works and the trunion is a close fit so they wont wedge in there either. I have cut aluminum and wood interchangeably for years and where I work we use a job site ridged for both frequently. we also cut aluminum on a beam saw and then go back to mdf regularly.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1776 days


#14 posted 12-27-2015 07:19 AM

Get one of these and have fun.

http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/840806/10x80T-NonFerr-Blade.aspx?gclid=COeI58G_-8kCFc2CfgoddggB5w

a lot of hardwoods are harder/tougher than aluminum.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1776 days


#15 posted 12-27-2015 07:25 AM



In other words. Never try anything yourself. Have someone hand it to you.

- TheFridge

If people would use the quote feature it would be easier to tell who you’re addressing.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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