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Forum topic by clin posted 12-26-2015 12:36 AM 860 views 0 times favorited 29 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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clin

514 posts in 461 days


12-26-2015 12:36 AM

I know that generally speaking, wearing gloves is NOT a good idea when working with power tools, such as a table saw.

But I’ve been working with some pre-finished birch plywood lately, and the cut edges are sharp, and it’s also very easy to get splinters in my hands. So I’ve been using some tight fitting gloves as much as I can, and NOT using them much when actually using the table saw.

Also, sometimes there are cuts where my hands are pretty far from the blade. For example, using a crosscut sled. Or ripping wide boards or panels. Of course I use push blocks and shoes when possible.

Is there in fact any gloves that are considered safe to use with a table saw?

Or should I just accept the fact that before I turn the saw on, I need to pull the gloves off.

-- Clin


29 replies so far

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conifur

955 posts in 617 days


#1 posted 12-26-2015 02:01 AM

I only work with gloves on most of the time. Light and tight fitting, they can save you, just as you feel the glove getting cut it gives you a chance to correct your action. 2 examples, I had my own hands on residential remodeling company,one day no gloves on, on and install of a post light with a self tapping screw to mount the light base on the pole, Phillips head, slipped off and nailed my thumb with the Phillips head drive, nasty.
Other time cutting sheet flooring on a straight edge with a razor knife, left hand holding the straight , index finger hanging over the edge, bad positioning in the first place, no glove on, sliced the meat on it along the finger nail about a 1/2”’, If I had my gloves on I would have felt the blade hit the glove and retreated. Gloves are your friend, once you get comfortable using them!!!!!
I have a pair with the sticky spots on them when doing small things on the router table.

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

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Loren

8309 posts in 3113 days


#2 posted 12-26-2015 02:10 AM

I’d say get used to taking them on and off. I’ve used gloves
for several years in handling material and working on machinery
and it’s made a big difference in the general condition of
my hands. That said, I don’t generally wear gloves when
making cuts. I won’t say I have never done it though. While
wearing gloves is generally considered totally dumb and
unsafe in woodworking, lets consider the hungry chainsaw
and ask if you think its a tool to wear gloves when using.

Of course I have often worn gloves when using a chain saw
and the reason is that if my hands get anywhere near the
running cutterhead and I have much larger safety issue
than whether or not I am wearing a glove.

Note however that I also use the guard whenever possible
with the table saw and consider the argument that
the cut needs to be visible malarkey. I set up the cut
with the saw off and there’s no reason to deviate,
and thus no reason to ‘watch’ the cut.

Properly you shouldn’t be wearing a glove anywhere
near a spinning motorized tool head, even the
innocent-looking belt sander (I’m way not recommending
wearing a glove with a belt sander, btw), but as
a practical matter you might see that the chain saw
argument and make some adjustments accordingly
as you gain insight and experience.

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RRBOU

136 posts in 1757 days


#3 posted 12-26-2015 02:19 AM

I wear gloves all the time when it is cold. My rule is if i an whiten 2” of any rotating steel I do not make the cut.

-- If guns cause crime all of mine are defective Randy

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Yonak

979 posts in 986 days


#4 posted 12-26-2015 02:22 AM

This one of those on-going issues people have strong opinions about and often don’t agree with each other. I’m in the camp of those who use gloves for almost every operation in the shop .. normally tight-fitting nimble gloves unless rough lumber is involved. Indeed, I have a different style pair for each type of operation.

Clearly it’s personal preference and a comfortability issue. If one doesn’t feel safe or doesn’t feel like they can safely operate with gloves on then gloves are not the answer for them. I suggest trying it both ways for awhile to determine your preference.

I feel that gloves have saved my fingers at the table saw and belt sander from nicks and scrapes more than once but I wouldn’t wear them if I wasn’t completely comfortable with my ability and dexterity with them on.

My favorite go-to gloves are Terminator gloves by Banom (a rather unfortunate name), which I got after a tip from another woodworker at this site, or another. Their grip tends to go away a bit after some use but they have good resistance to splinters.

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Aj2

692 posts in 1263 days


#5 posted 12-26-2015 02:26 AM

I use gloves when it’s needed rough sawn Douglas fir and Western red Cedar splinters are nasty.And hard to get out.

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Yonak

979 posts in 986 days


#6 posted 12-26-2015 02:37 AM


I have a pair with the sticky spots on them when doing small things on the router table.

- conifur

conifur, which gloves to you use at the router table ? I’m in the market for a glove with good grip.

View Loren's profile

Loren

8309 posts in 3113 days


#7 posted 12-26-2015 02:38 AM

I will say for sure that you could get real messed up
wearing gloves while operating a drill press. The
tool looks real innocent and runs quiet but it could
break your hand or worse real quick if a glove got
caught.

A university student was killed a few years
back when hair got caught in a small laboratory
lathe.

View lateralus819's profile

lateralus819

2236 posts in 1354 days


#8 posted 12-26-2015 03:18 AM

Guy at work was clearing a chip off a Drill press and it tangled his hand up good. Luckily he got it out before it did any real damage. He was bleeding and sore for a while.

View cracknpop's profile

cracknpop

195 posts in 1814 days


#9 posted 12-26-2015 03:19 PM

I agree, clothing/hair near spinning objects can lead to significant injuries real quick. With that being said…

I frequently wear gloves in the shop. Currently I am wearing a pair of Majestic Cut-Less, seamless knit dipped in HPPE that a friend gave me (he works at local car assembly factory) They are snug fitting and the coating keeps them from snagging/protects from splinters. The palm coating softened up very quickly and allows decent tactile sensitivity. So far, I like them a lot better than the leather palm ‘Mechanix type’ gloves I typically use.

Extra care is necessary, but hey, aren’t we supposed to be EXTRA careful anytime we are using sharp/spinning tools?

-- Rick - I know I am not perfect, but I will keep pressing on toward the goal of becoming all I am called to be.

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conifur

955 posts in 617 days


#10 posted 12-26-2015 03:32 PM

Yonak
they are a cotton type that have the little rubber dots on them, some have lines of rubber, but on the router table with a smooth piece of wood they work nice for me.

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

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CharlesA

3022 posts in 1263 days


#11 posted 12-26-2015 03:41 PM


This one of those on-going issues people have strong opinions about and often don t agree with each other.

- Yonak

I’d phrase that a bit differently. For use with machines with spinning blades, the vast majority of experienced woodworkers never use gloves, and a small minority believe they can do so safely b/c of the type of glove they use, or how close they get to the blade, or haw safe they are, etc.

The above has nothing to do with folks who wear gloves to move rough lumber, plywood, etc. Lots of good reasons to wear gloves when there’s no spinning blades around. All you need is one solid cotton thread to get wrapped on a router blade.

I have heard of folks who where heavy nitrile gloves or the like. They’ll just shred on contact. I would think the cut-less gloves would be particularly dangerous because they’re made to resist the cutting of the glove. The great danger with gloves is that the fabric or leather is strong enough not to snap or cut but do pull your hand into the blade. The coating could mitigate that to a point.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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dhazelton

2325 posts in 1762 days


#12 posted 12-26-2015 04:23 PM

I always think that if I could make gloves work the way chainsaw chaps work I could make a million dollars. But table saws aren’t chainsaws so I guess I will stay poor.

Maybe Sawstop will come out with a jointer and DP and circular saw and pneumatic nail guns and we can all feel safe all the time.

Maybe those gloves that look like they were dipped in rubber would be safe.

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3022 posts in 1263 days


#13 posted 12-26-2015 04:33 PM

I think of the tear-away jersey analogy. Remember back a few decades when college football teams used tear-away jerseys for their running backs and wide receivers? When defensive player would grab the jersey, they’d be left with a handful of jersey, watching the player run down the field. Weaker fabric was better in that case.

When hands/gloves get around spinning blades, you don’t want strength—better a nick on the skin than a hand pulled in by the glove.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115202 posts in 3042 days


#14 posted 12-26-2015 04:38 PM

There have been a number of post that talk about a persons glove getting caught in the table saw blade and pulling their hands into the blade,one person was a surgeon and said after the fact he felt before the accident his hands would never get that close to the blade.
It’s only common sense to use gloves where you need them but take them off when operating machinery.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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nick_name

17 posts in 430 days


#15 posted 12-26-2015 05:07 PM

I have been wearing CLC gloves for years. The flex grip Workright style is lightweight and perfectly fits my hand to the point that I feel like it’s an extra layer of tough skin. For a $12 pair of gloves, it’s hard to find a better value.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00495ZFDE

As I get older I am much more tuned for shop safety and these thin gloves provide the right level of protection without introducing a safety issue.

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