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Forum topic by ttocsmi posted 12-23-2015 03:59 PM 495 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ttocsmi

26 posts in 849 days


12-23-2015 03:59 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

For my double double bed project, with the exception of the posts, I’ve not started to cut wood for the headboards. Here’s what I have now:

All wood is red oak. The posts are 3.5×3.5, the (curved) top rail is made from 6/4, and the top plate will be 1×5 or so.

Here’s the problem: It looks plain. Even with the curved rail, it still looks plain. I’ve seen a few designs where crown molding has been added below the top plate, but that may be a lot of work with the larger posts. I’m proud of the curved rail, but that’s about the extent of my creativity.

Any suggestions? Come on, spruce it up (hah)! Thanks for the feedback.

-- Knight of Sufferlandria 2015


12 replies so far

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bearkatwood

1194 posts in 472 days


#1 posted 12-23-2015 04:13 PM

If you want to add to the craftsman style look you could add some cross rails.

If you want a more victorian look you could extend the curve up and add some scroll work.

You could do the crown mold across the top between the posts and add some applique moldings to the posts.
Hope this helps.

-- Brian Noel

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conifur

955 posts in 611 days


#2 posted 12-23-2015 04:26 PM

Thats the simplicity of Craftsman design, I made tables with sides like that, I used cherry, but inlayed/sandwiched 3/8”’walnut in the legs and used walnut spacers 3/8” square between the slats that I used walnut for also.Taper the legs on the 2 inside faces below the lower rail,and outside vertical ledge, champher or add a cove.

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

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conifur

955 posts in 611 days


#3 posted 12-23-2015 04:36 PM

A more detailed pic, and please use white oak not red and quarter sawn if you can.

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

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conifur

955 posts in 611 days


#4 posted 12-23-2015 04:37 PM

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

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conifur

955 posts in 611 days


#5 posted 12-23-2015 04:38 PM

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

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conifur

955 posts in 611 days


#6 posted 12-23-2015 04:39 PM

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

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conifur

955 posts in 611 days


#7 posted 12-23-2015 04:42 PM

I hope that gives you some design ideas.

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

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ttocsmi

26 posts in 849 days


#8 posted 12-23-2015 05:11 PM

indeed! that’s a lot of ideas. Thanks.

why did you say white not red oak?

-- Knight of Sufferlandria 2015

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conifur

955 posts in 611 days


#9 posted 12-23-2015 05:18 PM

Quarter sawn white is the original wood used, if you go with flat sawn oak be it white of red, white has a whole different look of the grain, it is much more closed grain and does not have the dark waves in as is so predominant in red oak.

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

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ttocsmi

26 posts in 849 days


#10 posted 12-23-2015 05:42 PM

ahh. we made some living room tables from QS white oak, but it was a while ago and i don’t recall what we paid for the wood. i had a rough idea of how many BF i’d need for this project and was looking carefully at the price of the species i was interested in – that’s how i got the red oak.

of course, i was one board short and rather than drive an hour to the mill, got a 6/4 S4S red oak board from a nearby moulding/architecture shop. good thing my wife offered to buy, since we got jacked on the price.

-- Knight of Sufferlandria 2015

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pintodeluxe

4852 posts in 2273 days


#11 posted 12-23-2015 06:41 PM

I think one simple way to add a little flair to projects like this is to use asymmetrical slat width. If you turn the central two slats into one wider slat, and widen the other slats a little bit, it would look like a totally different design.

Have you figured out how you’re going to do the curved joinery? I have a simple method if you P.M. me I would be happy to share.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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AandCstyle

2561 posts in 1717 days


#12 posted 12-23-2015 11:49 PM

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