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Forum topic by GregTP posted 12-23-2015 01:08 PM 1718 views 0 times favorited 30 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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GregTP

51 posts in 408 days


12-23-2015 01:08 PM

Topic tags/keywords: plane restoration antique

My father in law surprised me with an incredible Christmas gift perfect for the antique tool junkie. He spent most of the year looking at flea markets, yard sales, and auctions for various antique tools; particularly saws and hand planes. In total he found thirteen hand planes, three Disston saws, and a cool old draw knife.

A few of the planes are rather common, and most of them are in need of pretty extensive restoration, however, there are some really cool ones. The jewel of the bunch (for me at least since I badly needed one) is a Stanley No. 4 that is in really good shape. I flattened the sole last night (I started two minutes after they walked out the door), which took quite a bit of work but I got 90% of the surface co-planar with a thin strip down the middle of the heel of the plane that I finally gave up on. Then I looked at the iron and chip breaker. The iron looks like it will be too much work to save so I will just get a new one.

Thats where my question comes in: looking on Amazon I found a bunch of options. Stanley makes a replacement for $14 that had a four star rating but the reviews were all over the map. Some said it came flat and took a nice edge, others showed pictures of an iron straight out of the box that was warped by an 1/8th of an inch on the back. Pinnacle makes replacements that cost $40-50, also with good reviews. Then of course there is Lie Nielson and Hock, both of which I would chose in an instant if all things were equal but the $60-70 price tag for the iron and chip breaker give me pause. Has anyone tried any/all of these options and would you mind sharing your experience? I dont mind spending the money since this will likely be my primary finishing plane until someday I can step up to a Lie Nielson, but if I can get an iron that will do well enough for cheaper I would.

Also in the boxes was a Stanley No. 190 rabbet plane (missing the depth stop gauge), and Stanley 220 block plane that was in fantastic shape, and a beautiful Stanley bailey jack plane with a steel frog and wooden body. A Henry Disston & Sons No. 4 miter saw (30”) that must weight ten pounds, and a Hudson jack plane that I haven’t done any research on yet. All-in-all it was an incredible gift, I will definitely have to step it up for him next year!

-- From exercise machine warning label: "Step ladders can cause injury and even death; the ROM machine is more dangerous than a stepladder"


30 replies so far

View racerglen's profile

racerglen

3112 posts in 2245 days


#1 posted 12-23-2015 01:22 PM

Ah family ! Very nice gifts, sure you’ll be having a great time with them all. Another option for a replacement blade for the #4 is Lee Valley.

-- Glen, B.C. Canada

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

1951 posts in 1453 days


#2 posted 12-23-2015 02:03 PM

A very thoughtful gift…enjoy them.

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

6572 posts in 1615 days


#3 posted 12-23-2015 03:28 PM

Look into the Veritas replacement blades and chipbreakers. PM-V11 steel if you go that route.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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Knothead62

2581 posts in 2426 days


#4 posted 12-23-2015 05:34 PM

That is a real Christmas gift. Just remember that you have a family and a job. Shut up the shop and visit them once in a while!

View Tim's profile

Tim

3118 posts in 1426 days


#5 posted 12-23-2015 05:40 PM

Great score. Your FIL is a keeper.

I haven’t done it but it should work fine to get just the blade and not a new cap iron. You can tune a cap iron fairly quickly.
Lee Valley has a variety of options as well:
http://www.leevalley.com/US/Wood/page.aspx?p=43698&cat=1,41182

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3942 posts in 1958 days


#6 posted 12-23-2015 07:35 PM

I put one of the Veritas A2 blades in a 605 I have, and really like it. When I bought it it seemed like the best compromise of quality versus price…LV has a free shipping event right now if you choose to go that way.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7482 posts in 1472 days


#7 posted 12-23-2015 10:27 PM

Nice gift indeed ! Now you’ll have to make something for him, using those new tools of course !

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1185 days


#8 posted 12-23-2015 10:35 PM

I have a Veritas #4 with their A2 blade and it holds an edge well and doesn’t take forever to sharpen either. That would be my vote.

View bandit571's profile (online now)

bandit571

14594 posts in 2148 days


#9 posted 12-23-2015 11:44 PM

Not exactly sure why this happens…...first thing everyone says is change out the blade…...have YET to see a reason to do so. IF you think the #4 could be in need of a “new” blade…Home Depot sells the 2” wide, thick iron from Buck Bothers @~ $3.00 + Tax. Once it is flattened and sharp, they work very nice.

That said, nice gift!

Still haven’t figured out WHY you’d need to change out the blades on the planes….unless they are sharpened almost done to the slot. Otherwise, the irons I can see look nice and long. No need to change them out, really. Be a good time to learn how to tune up each plane, and learn to sharpen the irons.

Thicker irons being better? BS, sorry. Those irons used the chipbreaker, and they kept any so-called “chatter” away. A well tuned iron and well mated chipbreaker will work just fine. Either way, learn to sharpen and tune, you will even with the “magical” new irons.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View Tim's profile

Tim

3118 posts in 1426 days


#10 posted 12-24-2015 12:14 AM



Not exactly sure why this happens…...first thing everyone says is change out the blade…...have YET to see a reason to do so. IF you think the #4 could be in need of a “new” blade…Home Depot sells the 2” wide, thick iron from Buck Bothers @~ $3.00 + Tax. Once it is flattened and sharp, they work very nice.
- bandit571

My HD stopped carrying those and they aren’t on the website anymore. Of course, just before I managed to pick any up. But also if the blade is very pitted it could easily take a couple hours to clean up, more if you’re not good at it. It’s not worth that much time to some people if they don’t have much shop time and or they make enough that they could buy one quicker. If someone has the time thats fine, and if they don’t I think that’s fine too. I don’t own any, but I can see why they would be worth it.

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bandit571

14594 posts in 2148 days


#11 posted 12-24-2015 12:17 AM

IF the OP needs a couple 2” wide irons…..I have two I’ll send to him. Just need the mailing address.

BTW: they will be sharpened and ready to go.
ps: He will be the one to mate the chipbreakers to the irons.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View paratrooper34's profile

paratrooper34

892 posts in 2416 days


#12 posted 12-24-2015 01:05 AM

Wow, that father-in-law is a keeper!

I have a few aftermarket blades. I have a Veritas A2 blade (which was noticeably harder to sharpen) that I installed in a plane used on my shooting board. The plus of that blade is edge retention which is important on a shoot board plane. Yep, the old blades that came with the old planes worked. But the metallurgy when compared to the newer replacements doesn’t come close when you need an edge to last long.

I also purchased a couple of Hock blades in O-1 metal. I like those blades. Additionally, for resale, planes that have aftermarket blades are going to have higher values.

The aftermarket blades I purchased required very little tuning to get them ready to use. For sharpening, they just needed a quick honing. As for the backs, very little to get them straight. I am getting ready to put my shoot board plane (Record T-5) on the market with the original blade plus the Veritas blade (bought a LN shoot board plane) and because I have that Veritas blade on it, it will fetch more money.

Good luck in whatever road you take and congrats on a nice little haul you got.

-- Mike

View bandit571's profile (online now)

bandit571

14594 posts in 2148 days


#13 posted 12-24-2015 01:33 AM

Hmmm, methinks we have been over this ground a few times before….
1): Higher prices for the plane with an after-market iron? All the buyers are after IS that iron, couldn’t care less about the rest. A COLLECTOR will pay extra for a complete, all original..aka Minty plane. Including the original blade.
2) : All of the irons I have AND USE are in the 50-100 year old range, and still taking a very sharp edge.

3): IF an older iron has not been abused by others, it will still preform as DESIGNED by the plane’s maker. A lot of the irons I have refurbbed….they were clamped up in the plane wrong, and left that way too long. They wound up deformed by misuse. Seen chipbreakers where I’ve had to pean them flat. irons with a wave in their length.

Just finished cleaning up an old W. Butcher ironed Jack plane. It is nice when the shavings just fly up out of the plane..

Rehab might have taken me an hour or so…..iron also has a slight camber….it is a Jack plane, after all. As for them Iron-bodied planes?

I just MIGHT know a thing or two.

4): Perfectly flat soles…..good luck with that. The areas that MUST be coplanar? toe, both sides of the mouth, and the heel. Everywhere else can be a bit lower than these. A little “hollow” does not effect a thing. As long as the main points are coplanar, plane is fine. Unless your name is Unibob…

That #4’s iron? How much space is between the edge and the slot? Other an inch, maybe? Grind a new bevel, and sharpen it up. As long as you are behind the rusty areas. These are usually just where the chipbreaker sat. Get back of that area, and you might just find some very good steel. DAMHIKT. BTDT.

Offer still stands. IF the OP still needs a couple 2” wide irons, that have been sharpened up and READY to use, send me the mailing address via PM, I will send them to you….on my dime.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View paratrooper34's profile

paratrooper34

892 posts in 2416 days


#14 posted 12-24-2015 01:50 AM



Hmmm, methinks we have been over this ground a few times before….
1): Higher prices for the plane with an after-market iron? All the buyers are after IS that iron, couldn t care less about the rest. A COLLECTOR will pay extra for a complete, all original..aka Minty plane. Including the original blade.
2) : All of the irons I have AND USE are in the 50-100 year old range, and still taking a very sharp edge.

3): IF an older iron has not been abused by others, it will still preform as DESIGNED by the plane s maker. A lot of the irons I have refurbbed….they were clamped up in the plane wrong, and left that way too long. They wound up deformed by misuse. Seen chipbreakers where I ve had to pean them flat. irons with a wave in their length.

Just finished cleaning up an old W. Butcher ironed Jack plane. It is nice when the shavings just fly up out of the plane..

Rehab might have taken me an hour or so…..iron also has a slight camber….it is a Jack plane, after all. As for them Iron-bodied planes?

I just MIGHT know a thing or two.

4): Perfectly flat soles…..good luck with that. The areas that MUST be coplanar? toe, both sides of the mouth, and the heel. Everywhere else can be a bit lower than these. A little “hollow” does not effect a thing. As long as the main points are coplanar, plane is fine. Unless your name is Unibob…

That #4 s iron? How much space is between the edge and the slot? Other an inch, maybe? Grind a new bevel, and sharpen it up. As long as you are behind the rusty areas. These are usually just where the chipbreaker sat. Get back of that area, and you might just find some very good steel. DAMHIKT. BTDT.

Offer still stands. IF the OP still needs a couple 2” wide irons, that have been sharpened up and READY to use, send me the mailing address via PM, I will send them to you….on my dime.

- bandit571

Hitting the spiked egg nog hard, huh?

Please tell us, in your infinite wisdom, how much collector value the OPs Stanley #4 has and how it would ruin resale value to not have the original iron with it? Hint: he could probably get a Happy Meal with it.

Your route from A to Z is just that: Yours. Don’t belittle people who don’t share your logic.

-- Mike

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

1643 posts in 1781 days


#15 posted 12-24-2015 01:56 AM

Check over the original blade and examine the back for pitting. The bevel-side of the blade isn’t important but the back is and must be smooth and flat to work correctly. If it’s badly pitted on the back, replace it. If not, clean it up, sharpen it and put it to use.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

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