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gluing up small *thin* panels

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Forum topic by XquietflyX posted 12-22-2015 05:08 PM 977 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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XquietflyX

289 posts in 428 days


12-22-2015 05:08 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I have some oak that is cut into 2 1/2” by 8 1/4” by 3/16” thick strips. I need to glue 4 of them into a small panel for the top of a jewelry box I’m building for my wife for Xmas.
My issue is i’m having a hard time figuring the proper way to clamp them to each other as they are so thin.
Does any one have tips for gluing small thin strips in to one larger panel? the final piece will be 10” by 8 1/4”.

thanks!
-Chris

-- You can tell a lot about your wife by her hands, for example if they are around your throat she's prolly pissed off at you...


20 replies so far

View WoodNSawdust's profile

WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 644 days


#1 posted 12-22-2015 05:11 PM

Use blue painters tape to connect two panels, flip over and open like a hinge, add glue, and then close and use more tape to hold together. Repeat with other panels.

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

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XquietflyX

289 posts in 428 days


#2 posted 12-22-2015 05:12 PM

will that be tight enough without clamping?


Use blue painters tape to connect two panels, flip over and open like a hinge, add glue, and then close and use more tape to hold together. Repeat with other panels.

- WoodNSawdust


-- You can tell a lot about your wife by her hands, for example if they are around your throat she's prolly pissed off at you...

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3555 posts in 1235 days


#3 posted 12-22-2015 05:12 PM

If you are going to use this as a veneer to put over a substrate, then glue the 2-1/2 strips one at a time to the sub.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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ChrisK

1809 posts in 2549 days


#4 posted 12-22-2015 05:20 PM

Use epoxy instead of wood glue. The tape and good wood glue should be just fine.

-- Chris K

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WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 644 days


#5 posted 12-22-2015 05:25 PM

That depends on if the wood is intended to be structural or not. Tests have shown that the glue is as strong or stronger than the wood. Just pull the tape tight so there are no gaps and the pieces fit tight together.


will that be tight enough without clamping?

Use blue painters tape to connect two panels, flip over and open like a hinge, add glue, and then close and use more tape to hold together. Repeat with other panels.

- WoodNSawdust

- XquietflyX


-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

View XquietflyX's profile

XquietflyX

289 posts in 428 days


#6 posted 12-22-2015 05:40 PM

Its not structural, but theres no substrate below it. It is going in place of where glass would go if the box had a glass see through top.


That depends on if the wood is intended to be structural or not. Tests have shown that the glue is as strong or stronger than the wood. Just pull the tape tight so there are no gaps and the pieces fit tight together.

will that be tight enough without clamping?

Use blue painters tape to connect two panels, flip over and open like a hinge, add glue, and then close and use more tape to hold together. Repeat with other panels.

- WoodNSawdust

- XquietflyX

- WoodNSawdust


-- You can tell a lot about your wife by her hands, for example if they are around your throat she's prolly pissed off at you...

View XquietflyX's profile

XquietflyX

289 posts in 428 days


#7 posted 12-22-2015 05:43 PM

this is not Mine, but the one i’ve built is this same style. in my case instead of glass i’m using the wood strips.

-- You can tell a lot about your wife by her hands, for example if they are around your throat she's prolly pissed off at you...

View shampeon's profile

shampeon

1719 posts in 1651 days


#8 posted 12-22-2015 05:49 PM

You can use tape. The technique is to press one side of the tape on one strip with your finger, stretch the tape out with the other hand, then press the other side down on the other strip. Do this maybe every inch on the strip, then flip it and do the other side.

-- ian | "You can't stop what's coming. It ain't all waiting on you. That's vanity."

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5765 posts in 954 days


#9 posted 12-22-2015 05:52 PM

as long as the surfaces are coated well it shouldn’t matter whether it’s clamped or not.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

832 posts in 690 days


#10 posted 12-22-2015 06:00 PM

I have used masking tape many times as a “clamp” on thin or irregularly shaped parts.

As WoodNSawdust says, use the blue masking tape (it has a bit more stretch). I like the 1” wide stuff.

Typically I will apply a thin bead of glue to the edges, enough to fully cover but avoiding excessive squeeze out.

Join the edges with the pieces lying on a flat surface (that glue won’t stick to).

Place a piece of tape (about 2” long) securely on one of the pieces, then while pressing your thumb down on the end, stretch the tape over the joint and press it down on the other side. The tape will spring back, effectively applying force to the joint.

I like to apply a strip of tape about every 2”.

After securing one side of your panel, flip the panel and tape the other side the same way. You can’t really over stretch the tape, if it breaks, just do it again with a little less force.
You can easily check the panel alignment and adjust for flush as you tape. Usually everything stays flush, but it won’t hurt to place you panel between some flat boards (non-stick) to keep things flat while the glue sets.

View XquietflyX's profile

XquietflyX

289 posts in 428 days


#11 posted 12-22-2015 06:30 PM

Thanks i’ll try this once i get home.


I have used masking tape many times as a “clamp” on thin or irregularly shaped parts.

As WoodNSawdust says, use the blue masking tape (it has a bit more stretch). I like the 1” wide stuff.

Typically I will apply a thin bead of glue to the edges, enough to fully cover but avoiding excessive squeeze out.

Join the edges with the pieces lying on a flat surface (that glue won t stick to).

Place a piece of tape (about 2” long) securely on one of the pieces, then while pressing your thumb down on the end, stretch the tape over the joint and press it down on the other side. The tape will spring back, effectively applying force to the joint.

I like to apply a strip of tape about every 2”.

After securing one side of your panel, flip the panel and tape the other side the same way. You can t really over stretch the tape, if it breaks, just do it again with a little less force.
You can easily check the panel alignment and adjust for flush as you tape. Usually everything stays flush, but it won t hurt to place you panel between some flat boards (non-stick) to keep things flat while the glue sets.

- splintergroup


-- You can tell a lot about your wife by her hands, for example if they are around your throat she's prolly pissed off at you...

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2200 posts in 948 days


#12 posted 12-22-2015 10:11 PM

Don’t like the tape myself. Instead I would use cauls covered with packing tape and light clamp pressure.

Keeping them flat is the biggest problem.

I would leave them in the cauls quite a while because on panels that thin the glue itself can cause some cupping.

If you just tape them and glue them I can almost guarantee problems keeping them flat.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View joey502's profile

joey502

487 posts in 986 days


#13 posted 12-23-2015 04:21 AM

I use clamps, light pressure, with cauls. The oak pieces in the pics are a dash over 1/4” when glued, I planned and sanded after the glue dried.

View Texcaster's profile

Texcaster

1140 posts in 1142 days


#14 posted 12-23-2015 10:50 AM

I use this method to join 3mm structural guitar tops and backs.

Small sprung joints

Minimum clamp pressure , weight the joint.

-- Mama calls me Texcaster but my real name is Mr. Earl.

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2417 posts in 2390 days


#15 posted 12-24-2015 01:49 AM

I glue up panels like this with masking tape as mentioned and then I put rubber bands around it to act as a clamp.

-- "You may have your PHD but I have my GED and my DD 214"

showing 1 through 15 of 20 replies

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