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Forum topic by Glen posted 12-22-2015 02:06 PM 800 views 0 times favorited 26 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Glen

109 posts in 2536 days


12-22-2015 02:06 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question blade

Is there a 10” table saw blade that does not leave any marks in all kinds of woods? I am sick of having to run pieces through the jointer after every time I cut them on the table saw.

-- Glen


26 replies so far

View conifur's profile

conifur

955 posts in 611 days


#1 posted 12-22-2015 02:08 PM

Freud’s glue line rip or Foresters same, are about the best, it also depends on your fence is set up correctly.

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

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tomsteve

393 posts in 679 days


#2 posted 12-22-2015 02:12 PM

theres some glue line rip blades out there but nothing beats a run across the jointer.
if youre having bad saw marks you may have to do some alignment work on the fence.

View GT350's profile

GT350

352 posts in 1441 days


#3 posted 12-22-2015 02:24 PM

I have the Forrest Woodworker II, I really have to look close to see the saw marks, I still like to run them over the jointer or take a hand plane to it.
Mike

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

1735 posts in 598 days


#4 posted 12-22-2015 02:24 PM

Agree with above on double checking your fence alignment. Even with a cheap blade you should get clean cuts for a while. I’d check fence alignment and arbor runout before spending $ on more blades.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3547 posts in 1227 days


#5 posted 12-22-2015 02:33 PM

Yes, make sure the back of your blade is not touching the wood as you are running it through. If it does, not only it leaves the marks on the board, it could potentially throw the piece right at your face.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View Glen's profile

Glen

109 posts in 2536 days


#6 posted 12-22-2015 02:56 PM

What is the best way to be sure that I have perfect fence alignment?

-- Glen

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7207 posts in 2835 days


#7 posted 12-22-2015 02:59 PM

There are many blades that will leave a glue-ready edge, but none will leave a finish-ready edge. The blade is only one component of a larger equation. The table saw setup and arbor runout are factors. A throat insert that doesn’t flex is crtiical. The shape of the wood prior to cutting is a big factor…it helps a lot of the material is flat and straight to start with so it’s no rocking and moving during the cut. Technique and feed rate are also factors.

Typically speaking, blades with that leave the cleanest edges are also the most prone to burning, because they simply put more carbide against the edge of the wood. Many are higher tooth blades, but there are also several lower tooth count blades that have extremely tight side clearances that leave a very clean edge.

What saw and blade are you currently using?

Tips for Picking Saw Blades

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View WoodNSawdust's profile

WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 636 days


#8 posted 12-22-2015 03:01 PM

Do a internet search for table saw alignment.

Basically:

mark a tooth on the saw blade.
Measure the distance between the tooth and the right miter saw slot
turn the saw blade to the back
measure again.
If the distance is different then you need to align the saw. Alignment procedures vary depending on the type of saw.

Do the same thing with the fence
lock the fence down
measure the distance between the front of the fence and the same edge of the same miter slot
measure the distance at the back of the fence
they should be the same, if not then align the fence.

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

3646 posts in 1725 days


#9 posted 12-22-2015 03:07 PM

Glen I had the same problem. I tried several different times to correct it ending frustrated. I finally broke down and bought the Woodpecker saw gauge. Using it to realign my fence made a significant difference.

View Glen's profile

Glen

109 posts in 2536 days


#10 posted 12-22-2015 03:35 PM

knotscott, I am using a 36 tooth Irwin thin kerf blade on a 10” Craftsman contractors saw.

-- Glen

View bearkatwood's profile

bearkatwood

1194 posts in 471 days


#11 posted 12-22-2015 03:38 PM

Sounds like your saw needs a tune up. Check the blade alignment with the saw top and fence alignment.

-- Brian Noel

View ThomasChippendale's profile

ThomasChippendale

244 posts in 392 days


#12 posted 12-22-2015 04:30 PM

One way to check if the blade is parallel to the fence is to look for the saw marks on the both right and left piece of wood after ripping. Visualize that the blade is not parralel so that the front (towards you when you push the stock) cuts the right side of the stock and the rear of the blade, assuming your guide is on the right hand side, rubs on the outer side of the plank. You will then have downwards marks on the right side plank and upwards marks on the left side piece. You then adjust your guide until you get a mix of up and downwards marks on the inner side, that is as good as you will get and good enough for any glue joint. You can imagine that otherwise, your cut has a wider kerf and a concave surface is left on both sides of the plank being ripped.

-- PJ

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7207 posts in 2835 days


#13 posted 12-22-2015 04:49 PM


knotscott, I am using a 36 tooth Irwin thin kerf blade on a 10” Craftsman contractors saw.

- Glen

If it’s one of the Irwin Marathon or Irwin Classic blades, changing blades would likely help a lot. A 40T or 50T blade from the Irwin Marples, Freud Diablo, CMT ITK Plus, and DeWalt Precision Trim series should all be an improvement, and most can be picked up locally in the $30-$40 range. Between getting a new blade and tuning your saw up, you should be closer to optimum performance from the saw.

As shown below: the pic at the top is about as good as it’ll get with a 40T blade:

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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Glen

109 posts in 2536 days


#14 posted 12-22-2015 07:57 PM

I have the Irwin Marathon blade. The saw marks from my blade look like the third picture down from the top. I am going to go shopping for one of the other blades that you have listed. Then I am going to get the Woodpecker saw gauge that BurlyBob did and re-align my fence and blade.

-- Glen

View jdh122's profile

jdh122

879 posts in 2277 days


#15 posted 12-22-2015 08:04 PM

That Woodpecker saw gauge looks nice and I bet it works beautifully. But if you have a dial indicator you can easily screw a board to your miter gauge and attach your dial indicator to that and get quite an exact measurement of how far out of parallel your top is out from your blade. For the money saved you could afford to buy a Woodworker II blade rather than the Marathon.

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

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