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Using furnace blower for homemade DC?

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Forum topic by splatman posted 12-21-2015 11:34 PM 838 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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splatman

557 posts in 859 days


12-21-2015 11:34 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question furnace blower dust dc homemade dust collector dust collection

Hi Jocks,

My Mom had her furnace replaced last spring, and I saved the old one, not knowing what I might do with it.

I was thinking, maybe use the blower from it, in a homemade dust collector. I don’t know what the horsepower or amp ratings on it are; the clamp band that holds the motor in place is covering most of the nameplate.
It had its own 30-amp 2-pole breaker. (Toaster coil had its own 60-amp 2-pole breaker)
It was made in (and the house built in) ‘94, so the bearings probably should be replaced.

The idea is, it’s powerful enough to blow hot air throughout a 66-foot-long doublewide, so it should suck dust and chips from a TS or planer (with the proper dust duct setup) w/o missing a speck, right? Has anyone done this before? How well did it work? Seriously overkill?

The motor has 3 wires: red and black, goes directly to motor, orange, goes to a capacitor, then to motor. 18 AWG stamped on wires, though they look more like 8 AWG. Printing error? Am I reading it funny? Or is it really 18 AWG; and the wires have thicker-than-usual insulation?

I was told the motor uses 240V No word on current. I was also told the output; cannot positively remember. Probably 2400 CFM. Could be off by an order of magnitude either way.


8 replies so far

View crank49's profile

crank49

3980 posts in 2431 days


#1 posted 12-21-2015 11:46 PM



The idea is, it s powerful enough to blow hot air throughout a 66-foot-long doublewide, so it should suck dust and chips from a TS or planer (with the proper dust duct setup) w/o missing a speck, right? – splatman

Sorry, but the answer is not so good.
A furnace blower is usually maxed out at about 1” to 2” static pressure. That’s not enough to generate the pressure needed to pull dust and chips through a duct and fight the resistance of a bag, cyclone or cartridge type filter. These all need about 10” static pressure.

It will make a good shop air filter, however.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7163 posts in 2258 days


#2 posted 12-22-2015 12:50 AM

Sounded worth a try….... tried it….... it wasn’t.
crank’s right. :-(

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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Holbs

1371 posts in 1489 days


#3 posted 12-22-2015 02:34 AM

I too have a furnace squirrel cage blower. As Crank & Paul advise, wouldn’t work for dust collection. but instead, use it as a air cleaner! That was my plan. til a Grizzly air cleaner fell in my lap 2 days later :) Still plan on using it for air cleaner on other side of shop though. Or in the house (lots of brush fires here in Northern Nevada and California) as a built-in air cleaner (would help rise the price of my house by thousands I bet!)

-- Yes, my profile picture is of a Carpenter Bee! The name is derived from the Ancient Greek "wood-cutter"

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Jim Finn

2408 posts in 2382 days


#4 posted 12-22-2015 02:37 AM

another use for a furnace blower is as an exhaust fan for your shop.

-- "You may have your PHD but I have my GED and my DD 214"

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lab7654

264 posts in 1707 days


#5 posted 12-22-2015 02:47 AM

Use it for a downdraft table if you have the space. I use one at work and I couldn’t imagine sanding 30+ doors and drawer fronts at a crack without it. If you clean it out often it’ll even have enough suction to act as an air cleaner; I use it like that when blowing dust off of tools.

-- Tristin King -- When in doubt, sand it.

View splatman's profile

splatman

557 posts in 859 days


#6 posted 12-22-2015 05:16 AM

I guess it’s settled: Air cleaner, downdraft table, or exhaust fan, not DC. That sure blows, just when I thought I had something, nope! At least not all is lost.

I have once thought of using the toaster coil in a homemade pottery kiln; I’m guessing that won’t go anywhere, unless the kiln is less than 1 cubic foot. After all, the furnace was built to heat a house, not collect dust or bake pottery. ha ha. I will probably find use for the parts, given enough time.

Don’t know what’s it really called. An electric furnace is really just a great big toaster with a blower attached. 2 things it’s good at: 1. Making your house toasty. 2. Toasting your energy budget.

View crank49's profile

crank49

3980 posts in 2431 days


#7 posted 01-13-2016 03:04 AM

Well, actually those coils can be used to make a kiln.
With a little creative re-connecting.
I am assuming by “toster coils” you are referring to the heating coils from an elecric furnace.
Two things to consider; those coils are designed to have air flowing over them all the time.
A kiln is a static situation with no air flow. Just hooked up to full voltage in a kiln with no air flow they will melt themselves.
After I melted my first set I figured I could lower the coil temperature by connecting two coils together in series. That effectively cuts the wattage (and temperature) in half. So a 10 kW coil that would heat up to 4000 degrees in still air will only heat up to 2000 degrees and be rated at 5 kW when the coils are re-wired in series. I made a kiln that heated to 1800 degrees for my jewelry manufacturing shop. Worked great. Had an internal dimension of 18” x 18” x 12”. Used a 30 amp 240 volt solid state relay connected to an Omega temperature controller and a type J thermocouple. Ran a couple of 12 hour cycles every week for several years on this furnace.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

View splatman's profile

splatman

557 posts in 859 days


#8 posted 01-13-2016 06:18 AM


am assuming by “toster coils” you are referring to the heating coils from an elecric furnace.

- crank49


That is correct. I put an asterisk after “toaster coil” in the middle paragraph, to refer to the footnote, but it made the rest of the paragraph bold. I put another asterisk at the start of the last paragraph (the footnote), but went poof altogether. The edit time frame had ended before I caught the mistake. Lesson: Always check the post before leaving the page.

Also learned: Toaster coil + no airflow – no creative reconnecting = Chernobyl.

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