LumberJocks

Adjusting parallelism on a Craftsman 226880 Table Saw

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by IanH posted 01-12-2010 12:23 AM 2128 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View IanH's profile

IanH

7 posts in 2540 days


01-12-2010 12:23 AM

Topic tags/keywords: parallelism direct drive tablesaw

I just bought an older Craftsman direct drive 2 H.P. table saw (Model # 226880). The blade is not parallel to the mitre gauge slots. When I measure the out-of-parallelism , I get .039” difference across 5 1/2 ” of an 8 1/2” blade. I have gone through the parallelism procedure in the manual and I am unable to bring the blade around enough to get it parallel. I suspect that I will have to get into the cradle assembly and modify the attachment points to allow movement of the blade to parallel. Does anyone have experience doing this on a direct drive saw? Are there any other issues besides the cradle assembly attachment points that I should be aware of? Thanks.

-- Ian


12 replies so far

View juniorjock's profile

juniorjock

1930 posts in 3225 days


#1 posted 01-13-2010 03:57 AM

I don’t have an answer for you, but maybe if we can get your post back toward the top, someone will be able to help you. Good Luck.

View ajosephg's profile

ajosephg

1878 posts in 3021 days


#2 posted 01-13-2010 04:48 AM

I had a Craftsman Direct Drive about a century ago and had the same problem. I don’t recall if yours is the same model number. The cradle assembly was held in place with 4 allen screws through the table top. I dropped the cradle and filed the holes to allow for greater adjustment. The problem is that it would not stay aligned so I sold it and got a non-Craftsman saw.

-- Joe

View IanH's profile

IanH

7 posts in 2540 days


#3 posted 01-13-2010 03:51 PM

Joe: thanks for your comment. I think I would prefer a blade that would go out of parallel to one that I can’t adjust.

-- Ian

View ajosephg's profile

ajosephg

1878 posts in 3021 days


#4 posted 01-13-2010 04:17 PM

Ianh: For sure it’s better than nothing. If you go with that approach you might see if you can put serrated lock washers between the cradle and table top (assuming that it doesn’t already have some.) Might also consider putting some lock tite thread locker on the screws. However, I’m not sure about doing that because it may have an unintended consequence if you need to loosen the screws for a future readustment.

-- Joe

View IanH's profile

IanH

7 posts in 2540 days


#5 posted 01-15-2010 06:20 PM

Joe: Joe: thanks again. I will use red Loctite in moderation and I have some confidence that the red will allow relatively easy disassembly. I took the tabletop off the frame and tried to ajust the blade upside down. What I found was that without the tilt screw attached to the frame to hold the blade at 90 degrees, the whole cradle flopped around and I couldn’t begin to adjust for parallelism. I will have another go at adjusting it out of the frame, probably after I finish my shelving project.

-- Ian

View IanH's profile

IanH

7 posts in 2540 days


#6 posted 02-03-2010 10:06 PM

Here is an update: I took the table top off of the frame of the saw and flipped it upside down on my workbench (with the help of my brother). I took the cradle off and modified the holes on the hanger where it attaches to the tabletop. I also naval jellied the underside of the table, and primed and finish-coated the cradle, underside of the tabletop, and all exposed rusty metal parts. I reassembled the saw and attempted to adjust the parallelism. I had no success; it was actually worse than before I started. There’s always a reward for diligent hard work. I worked on adjusting the parallelism by tilting the saw every which way and nothing worked. The blade and cradle simply wouldn’t move towards parallel even with the four screws completely losse. I then took the tabletop off of the saw frame again and suspended it upside down off the surface of the work table using gallon paint cans. I re-adjusted one height screw stop to prevent the cradle from contacting the underside of the tabletop and then shimmed under the cradle to get the blade square (since the tilt scew was disconnected). The adjustment under these conditions was quick, precise, and gratifying. I used a combination square underneath the tabletop and ran it along one of the mitre gauage slots to check for parallelism. With the insert removed it is easy to see the combination square and measure distance to the blade. I used a small amount of blue Loctite on the four screws holding the cradle. I found that when I had cranked the height screw for maximum height the cradle jammed against the table top, preventing movement. Earlier I had adjusted the cradle for maximum cut depth. This time I adjusted the cradle not to bind against the tabletop. More importantly, the tilt screw (if attached to the frame) will essentially lock the cradle in place , preventing one end of it from moving at all. By adjusting it outside of the frame I avoided both these problems and found the cradle moved easily. I reassembled the saw and again double triple checked for paralleism. I found an acceptably parallel blade that doesn’t burn my wood any more. Photos may follow as and when I feel like navigating the third-party website requirement for posting pictures on Lumberjocks.

-- Ian

View ajosephg's profile

ajosephg

1878 posts in 3021 days


#7 posted 02-03-2010 10:21 PM

Good job, I’m happy for you.

-- Joe

View Radu's profile

Radu

324 posts in 2503 days


#8 posted 02-03-2010 10:40 PM

Ian,
You mentioned about using the Naval Jelly. Did it really work for you? How long did you leave it on? I got an older Craftsman TS and the underside of the table is pretty rusty. I might take it off to clean it and protect it.
Thanks, Radu

View Sawkerf's profile

Sawkerf

1730 posts in 2528 days


#9 posted 02-04-2010 02:54 AM

Ian -
During my 25 years of using a Craftsman contractors TS, I did pretty much the same thing, but used a long piece of 1” aluminum square tubing to realign the blade to the miter slots.

I ran the blade to full height and laid the tubing on the table so it touched the front and rear blade teeth. Then I took my measurements between the tubing and the front and rear of the miter slot. Doing this amplifies the out of parallel distance and makes it easier to really dial in the blade.

-- Adversity doesn't build character...................it reveals it.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115201 posts in 3037 days


#10 posted 02-04-2010 02:57 AM

progress a good thing

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View IanH's profile

IanH

7 posts in 2540 days


#11 posted 02-04-2010 06:30 PM

Thanks for the comments, guys.
Radu: I have pictures of the naval jelly being applied which I would be happy to send you. It seems obvious, but Naval Jelly will attack many things, so the iron table top really needs to be stripped down to basics. I tested a small section to see if ten minutes exposure to the naval jelly would work. When that seemed to do a good job I smeared the jelly all over the rusty parts with a toothbrush in an area where I could use a hose and where the runoff would go directly into a sewer. I left the jelly on for close to twenty minutes and then hosed it off and wiped in down. When it was dry I applied Rustoleum Rusty Metal Primer (oil-based) and then an oil based finish coat in black.

-- Ian

View IanH's profile

IanH

7 posts in 2540 days


#12 posted 02-04-2010 06:35 PM

Sawkerf:
Thanks for the comment. I did use a ten inch blade when checking parallelism in order to maginfy the out of parallel distance. I also tried using a large square. Your suggestion of using 1” square tubing is excellent and I will take it up.

-- Ian

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com