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Forum topic by John1985 posted 12-17-2015 09:49 PM 920 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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John1985

6 posts in 728 days


12-17-2015 09:49 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question pine

Hi guys! I lucked into 2 pine slabs that are 8’ long by 20” wide. I found a guy who had a 24” planer and he planed them down for me so I could use them as a tabletop. But, one of the slabs is cupped. After looking at the forums here what I should have done was had it joined first then planed because the planer will push it level while planing but that won’t last. Me, being the genius that I am, figured no big deal because when I attach them to the steel legs I made it’ll straighten it out. Now I know why they always say that I’m dumber than wood. because the cupped slab started cracking right down the middle(see the pic, I tried to draw a square around where its cracking on the face as well as show the cup and the crack at the end). Is there anything I can do to fix this? I’ve thought about drilling larger holes in the legs and using washers so that while it’ll still be bolted straight it will be able to expand and contract horizontally. But otherwise I have no ideas. Hopefully since pretty much everybody here is much smarter than I am you can help me figure something out.


10 replies so far

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BUBBATAY

52 posts in 1777 days


#1 posted 12-17-2015 09:58 PM

John if you Rip the piece at the cup and edge joint it and then glue it up I do not think you woud even notice the rip line

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John1985

6 posts in 728 days


#2 posted 12-17-2015 10:08 PM

I had pondered that. My question is I don’t have a jointer, but I do have a circular saw. If I cut along the cup with that and then cut along the cut on both pieces so the sides line up would that work? Or would I need somebody with a jointer to do it right?

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John1985

6 posts in 728 days


#3 posted 12-17-2015 10:13 PM



John if you Rip the piece at the cup and edge joint it and then glue it up I do not think you woud even notice the rip line

- BUBBATAY

I had pondered that. My question is I don’t have a jointer, but I do have a circular saw. If I cut along the cup with that and then cut along the cut on both pieces so the sides line up would that work? Or would I need somebody with a jointer to do it right?

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Kazooman

626 posts in 1415 days


#4 posted 12-17-2015 10:31 PM

I have never worked with a slab that size, but I have worked with lots of smaller boards that were cut from the center of the tree like where your crack is occurring, and I think you are going to have a perpetual headache. The difference in expansion with changes in moisture content between the upper and lower surfaces will be great. That’s why it is curving and why the crack is opening along the top. I don’t think this is so much an issue with not jointing one face before planing as it is the result of the grain pattern in the wood itself.

To get a really stable table top you at well need to cut out all of that heart wood and replace it with some wood from the other slab. Alternating the orientation of the grain patterns would help if you choose to go that route.

One stable table top might be better than two severely cupped tops with cracks.

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shampeon

1713 posts in 1646 days


#5 posted 12-17-2015 10:50 PM

Get somebody with a jointer or a longer hand plane and learn about bookmatched jointing.

You’re getting splitting from the pith of the board. Removing the pith will leave you with mostly quartersawn boards that should be pretty stable.

-- ian | "You can't stop what's coming. It ain't all waiting on you. That's vanity."

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John1985

6 posts in 728 days


#6 posted 12-18-2015 01:13 AM


I have never worked with a slab that size, but I have worked with lots of smaller boards that were cut from the center of the tree like where your crack is occurring, and I think you are going to have a perpetual headache. The difference in expansion with changes in moisture content between the upper and lower surfaces will be great. That s why it is curving and why the crack is opening along the top. I don t think this is so much an issue with not jointing one face before planing as it is the result of the grain pattern in the wood itself.

To get a really stable table top you at well need to cut out all of that heart wood and replace it with some wood from the other slab. Alternating the orientation of the grain patterns would help if you choose to go that route.

One stable table top might be better than two severely cupped tops with cracks.

- Kazooman

So you think that just cutting along the center and then jointing the 2 pieces together would not be enough?

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bearkatwood

1202 posts in 474 days


#7 posted 12-18-2015 03:13 AM

I think as long as you took the worst of the heart wood out it would be fine, it might be neat to glue it back together with the blue edges together.

-- Brian Noel

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John1985

6 posts in 728 days


#8 posted 12-18-2015 03:46 AM



I think as long as you took the worst of the heart wood out it would be fine, it might be neat to glue it back together with the blue edges together.

- bearkatwood


Could you give me an estimate of how much of the heart wood you think? For instance everything within the rectangle or even more?

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

1750 posts in 601 days


#9 posted 12-18-2015 08:09 PM


Could you give me an estimate of how much of the heart wood you think? For instance everything within the rectangle or even more?

- John1985

In your first picture, see the dark colored circles in the center of the board? I’d remove them completely. If you really need the full width of the slab, rip it right down the center of the heartwood and glue it up with the heartwood at the edges. You’ll get cupping at the edges of your table but not splitting.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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Handyvan

7 posts in 259 days


#10 posted 04-10-2016 02:14 PM

If you don’t mind a butcher-block look, do this instead: Rip both planks into several 2” or 3” strips. Joint all the edges. If you don’t have a biscuit cutter, cut a 1/8” or 1/4” kerf into the exact center of all but the two outside edges & make enough splines to aid in keeping the pieces even. Turn every-other strip over and lay them side-by-side. Looking at the end grain, you should see the alternating “tree rings” oriented up & down. Add the spines & glue it back together.

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