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Forum topic by rwe2156 posted 12-16-2015 03:23 PM 1357 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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rwe2156

2192 posts in 943 days


12-16-2015 03:23 PM

I’ve always used the higher speed for resawing (18” saw & its about all I do on it).

What would one use the lower speed for?

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!


14 replies so far

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conifur

955 posts in 614 days


#1 posted 12-16-2015 03:33 PM

Plastics, non ferrous metals

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

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Planeman40

805 posts in 2224 days


#2 posted 12-16-2015 05:53 PM

Actually, the slow speed IS for ferrous metals – steel, cast iron, etc. The slow speed is to reduce heat from friction which will ruin the blade. Of course, you will need a metal cutting blade, and always remember: keep a minimum of two teeth in the metal at all times. This prevents the blade from snagging on the metal and tearing the teeth out. You can cut soft metals like aluminum and brass at the high speed on a band saw though. Actually, you can cut aluminum on a table saw with no problem if the blade has carbide teeth.

Planeman

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

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conifur

955 posts in 614 days


#3 posted 12-16-2015 05:57 PM

I may have missed something, I have 3 BS a Sears, SS and a Delta, all say dont use for ferrous metals.

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

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MrUnix

4221 posts in 1662 days


#4 posted 12-16-2015 05:58 PM

Depends on the speeds :)

What saw is it? Once you know what the speeds are for it, you can determine what it is designed for… here is an example found floating around the web:

For the Delta 14” Wood/Metal bandsaw (aka: 28-3xx), here is the speed chart for various materials:

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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Mosquito

8082 posts in 1755 days


#5 posted 12-16-2015 06:02 PM

With a bandsaw designed specifically for metal (not combination metal/wood), the blade speeds are typically much lower than one designed for wood. It seems like frequently the higher speed of a metal cutting bandsaw is about the same as the slow speed of a wood cutting bandsaw. That’s usually why a wood bandsaw says “non-ferrous metal only”

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN - http://www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods - http://www.TheModsquito.com

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Planeman40

805 posts in 2224 days


#6 posted 12-16-2015 08:35 PM

rwe2156 states he has an 18 inch bandsaw which would not be a table top type. It would obviously be an industrial bandsaw at that size. Many industrial 18 inch bandsaws offer a high speed (wood), low speed (ferrous metals) speed change, usually by an in-out dog like in the (older) larger Delta band saws. You reach beneath the stand to make the change.

Planeman

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

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rwe2156

2192 posts in 943 days


#7 posted 12-16-2015 11:15 PM

Its a Rikon 18” Model 10-345

The blade speeds are 1510/3220.

The manual doesn’t say anything about it.
Haven’t looked any further than the manual.

Guess I’ll just leave it on high speed since I’ll never put anything but wood through it.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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conifur

955 posts in 614 days


#8 posted 12-16-2015 11:31 PM

Almost every metal cutting BS I have seen or used for ferrous metals runs a blade coolant/lube, unless it is a hand held.

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

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conifur

955 posts in 614 days


#9 posted 12-16-2015 11:36 PM

The blade speeds are 1510/3220. If that is FPM then according to the chart posted that is only good for aluminum. And most other metals are 300 or<.

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

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conifur

955 posts in 614 days


#10 posted 12-16-2015 11:57 PM

Model: 10-345
18” ” Woodworking”’ Bandsaw
Front page of there manual.
”’ Slow speed can be used for more exacting work and control”’. From my 2 speed Sears manual.

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

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JeffP

573 posts in 854 days


#11 posted 12-17-2015 12:23 AM

How old is that saw? Note item #3 in the second list: “Asbestos, Sheet”
How long since you could get a sheet of asbestos without some sort of a hazardous materials license?


Depends on the speeds :)

What saw is it? Once you know what the speeds are for it, you can determine what it is designed for… here is an example found floating around the web:

For the Delta 14” Wood/Metal bandsaw (aka: 28-3xx), here is the speed chart for various materials:

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix


-- Last week I finally got my $*i# together. Unfortunately, it was in my shop, so I will probably never find it again.

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MrUnix

4221 posts in 1662 days


#12 posted 12-17-2015 12:40 AM

How old is that saw? Note item #3 in the second list: “Asbestos, Sheet”
- JeffP

That was from a 1943 Delta Manual :)

14-inch Wood-Cutting and Metal-Cutting Band Saws

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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rwe2156

2192 posts in 943 days


#13 posted 12-17-2015 01:42 AM

By golly it does say “woodworking bandsaw” how did I miss that?

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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Planeman40

805 posts in 2224 days


#14 posted 12-17-2015 02:16 AM

“The blade speeds are 1510/3220.”

Yep, that’s too high a speed for ferrous metal. Sounds like your bandsaw is made only for cutting wood at those speeds. I’m not sure why the two speeds for a wood cutting bandsaw. I did some research on google and most wood recommendations are around 3,000 fpm. which is what I have always used. Couldn’t find anything recommended for the 1,500 fpm area. You might call Ricon about this I am curious now.

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

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