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Like some insight on adding new circuits & outlets, 240v vs 120v

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Forum topic by Jeison posted 01-11-2010 12:12 AM 1792 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jeison

951 posts in 2567 days


01-11-2010 12:12 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question electrical wiring outlets 120v 240v shop

So one of the very first things to get done this spring is I want to have more outlets and probably another circuit or two added to the garage (theres currently one 120V, 15amp circuit feeding the whole garage, and only one outlet with easy access to what will be the shop area! Eeep!)

Anyways I’ve been reading up on wiring and such so I know enough that when I get an electrician out here we can determine what I need. Now all the tools I own currently or plan to buy in the foreseeable future (including a better table saw, although the one I’m looking at can use 110 or 220) all run on 110V and max out at 15amp. However from the reading I’ve been doing, I keep seeing recommendations to run a 240v circuit since at that voltage the amp draw is cut in half.

So what I wanna know is, is it safe/possible/wise to run a tool that normally uses 110v on a 240v circuit or will that damage the tool/blow the circuit? For that matter, what if you plug in a 220v tool to a 120v circuit (assuming you have enough available amps to feed the tool in either case)

I want to understand as I want to add as few new circuits as necessary to keep costs down, tho I’ll add however many is necessary. Currently thinking a 20 amp 120v “general” circuit, and a 20amp 240v “tablesaw” circuit. Things like lighting and battery chargers will continue to run off the original 15amp, 120V garage circuit

‘ppreciate any insight/advice gang! (btw everything I have/will get are lighter “hobbyist” level tools, nothing industrial quality…YET!! lol)

-- - Jei, Rockford IL - When in doubt, spray it with WD-40 and wrap it with duct tape. The details will attend to themselves.


12 replies so far

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TopamaxSurvivor

17654 posts in 3135 days


#1 posted 01-11-2010 12:26 AM

Here’s the bottomline from a master electrician: 3 hp and above, use 240 v. Run the rest of your stuff on 120 20amp cir. The 15 amp in the garage probably feeds all the other outlets required to be GFCI protected including outdoors and the bathrooms. You can use it until you start having problems with the total load. That simple in a nutshell, Good luck BTW, since I’m not an ATTY the meter isn’t running for advice :-))

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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Jeison

951 posts in 2567 days


#2 posted 01-11-2010 01:13 AM

Cool, you sir deserve a cookie :)

The contractor saw I’m looking is rated 1 3/4 hp, everything else is lightweight benchtop stuff (well I want to get a 14” bandsaw, but the one I’m lookin at is only 3/4 hp itself). I’m 90% positive that the garage circuit is just the garage, every other room seems to have its own dedicated circuit (its a condo, the outside stuff is run off a seperate panel for the whole building) but thats just a noob looking at the labeling in the panel lol!

Thats one other thing that confused me, one outlet in the garage is GFCI (thats where its got the little circuit breaker type buttons on it it right?) and the other one (the one I use for tools currently) is not, I thought all outdoor/garage/basement outlets were required to be?

-- - Jei, Rockford IL - When in doubt, spray it with WD-40 and wrap it with duct tape. The details will attend to themselves.

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TopamaxSurvivor

17654 posts in 3135 days


#3 posted 01-11-2010 01:37 AM

Assumed you were in a single family :-) They are required to be protected and most likely are by the one that has the buttons on it. I wouldn’t worry about running tools until you start having trouble, then add another circuit. If the table saw trips the 15 amp breaker, yoiu know your time is up :-)) Where’s the cookie jar?? Chocolate chip, of course!!

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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Jeison

951 posts in 2567 days


#4 posted 01-11-2010 02:03 AM

Cool, I’d still like to have a couple more outlets put in, having just that one is inconvenient to say the least LOL, but we’ll see how that circuit handles things before I go running off and OMG I NEED FIFTEEN CIRCUITS WITH 9000 AMP CAPACITY, STAT!! lol :) It’ll probably be a while before I can get the contractor saw anyways, my dandy little Skil benchtop will have to hold on till I get that far down the list heh!

also, cookie jar is on the floor guarded by the toddler with chocolate all over her face at the moment :D

-- - Jei, Rockford IL - When in doubt, spray it with WD-40 and wrap it with duct tape. The details will attend to themselves.

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TopamaxSurvivor

17654 posts in 3135 days


#5 posted 01-11-2010 02:12 AM

Better get her to a safe place. The only time a toddler is is jeapordy around me is when between me and the CC cookies !!

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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drfixit

318 posts in 2603 days


#6 posted 01-11-2010 02:18 AM

NEVER hook up a tool or anything for that matter to voltage it is not rated for. It will damage the tool, or even you, could cause a fire. I have my table saw which can run on 120 or 220 hooked up to 220 after years of running it on 120. It seems to run better on the 220. My aircompressor is on 220 and everything else is on 120. Tools that are designed to run on different voltages normally require that you rewire them at the motor to change voltages. This is quite easy and most of them have lables on how to do this.

-- I GIVE UP!!!! I've cut this @!&*!% board 3 times.... its still too short!

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Jeison

951 posts in 2567 days


#7 posted 01-11-2010 02:21 AM

Hey you wanna fight her for it go right ahead, Uncle Jei knows better lol!!

thanks dr, I kinda figured it was bad, but in a few articles I read kinda confused me, some sounded like you could, some not.

-- - Jei, Rockford IL - When in doubt, spray it with WD-40 and wrap it with duct tape. The details will attend to themselves.

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drfixit

318 posts in 2603 days


#8 posted 01-11-2010 02:26 AM

Only if the tool was deigned for it. My Ridgid table saw motor can be wired to ethier. That is the reason for the plugs being different on different voltages

-- I GIVE UP!!!! I've cut this @!&*!% board 3 times.... its still too short!

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Jeison

951 posts in 2567 days


#9 posted 01-11-2010 02:39 AM

oh i didnt know they used different plug types (like I mentioned I’m a noob when it comes to wiring), good to know.

-- - Jei, Rockford IL - When in doubt, spray it with WD-40 and wrap it with duct tape. The details will attend to themselves.

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TopamaxSurvivor

17654 posts in 3135 days


#10 posted 01-11-2010 02:40 AM

Got to admit it would be hard to run over a kid that cute :-))

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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Jeison

951 posts in 2567 days


#11 posted 01-11-2010 02:45 AM

You gotta catch her first, man that kid is quick, she just builds up speed and starts ricocheting off of stuff :D

-- - Jei, Rockford IL - When in doubt, spray it with WD-40 and wrap it with duct tape. The details will attend to themselves.

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Ger21

1047 posts in 2590 days


#12 posted 01-11-2010 04:16 PM

For a tool that can be wired both 110 and 220, you need to open up the motor and change the wiring in the motor to switch.

-- Gerry, http://www.thecncwoodworker.com/index.html http://www.jointcam.com

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