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Forum topic by JUC posted 12-14-2015 06:42 PM 677 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JUC

116 posts in 1351 days


12-14-2015 06:42 PM

Good morning, a friend gave some large walnut limbs from a tree he cut down, the tree stood dead for about 1 year. I want to store them until I am ready to use. I know I need to paint the ends, do I leave the bark on or remove it. The walnut will be kept inside at a temp. of no less than 50°. Anything else I need to know or do?
Thank you for your help!!
Jeffrey

-- If no one will ever see it, all the more reason to make it right


7 replies so far

View mds2's profile

mds2

308 posts in 1405 days


#1 posted 12-14-2015 07:00 PM

Paint the ends, leave the bark on. That is really all you need to do.

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2150 days


#2 posted 12-15-2015 01:25 AM

If you are planning to saw those into lumber, be aware that limb wood usually has a lot of tension wood that will warp, twist, bow, etc when sawed.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View Yonak's profile

Yonak

979 posts in 981 days


#3 posted 12-15-2015 02:23 AM



If you are planning to saw those into lumber, be aware that limb wood usually has a lot of tension wood that will warp, twist, bow, etc when sawed.

- gfadvm

If you allow the limb to fully dry before cutting will the tension remain or does it stabilize ?

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gfadvm

14940 posts in 2150 days


#4 posted 12-15-2015 03:20 AM

A big limb won’t fully dry to its center (if we’re talking about 6-12” diameter limbs). The tension wood will remain even when dried :( I wish it weren’t so but I have burned a lot of big walnut limbs in my stove.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View mtenterprises's profile

mtenterprises

933 posts in 2153 days


#5 posted 12-19-2015 12:44 PM

Found this guy on 2 posts – wlpwlp – with the same crap! Cricket, remove this guy and this crap!

-- See pictures on Flickr - http://www.flickr.com/photos/44216106@N07/ And visit my Facebook page - facebook.com/MTEnterprises

View BobAnderton's profile

BobAnderton

218 posts in 2251 days


#6 posted 12-19-2015 07:18 PM

Wood in the round (containing the pith) is likely to develop cracks as it dries further. Your best bet would be to get it slabbed up into boards for drying, or if you want to save chunks for turning make parallel cuts on either side of the pith to get large chunks that don’t contain the pith. If you let it crack and then try to work around the cracks your useful yield will be a lot lower.

-- Bob Anderton - Austin, TX - Nova 3000 lathe, Alaskan Mark III mill, Husqavarna Saw

View sawdustdad's profile

sawdustdad

131 posts in 345 days


#7 posted 12-24-2015 06:02 PM

Normally it is best to slab the wood while wet to minimize checking. Your limbs probably already have checks due to being from a dead tree.

The lumber may not be useful for much due to tensions commonly found in limbs. I’d slab it now and sticker it to dry. you may be able to use it after it dries thoroughly if you can joint it straight but I wouldn’t use it for cabinet doors or drawer frames, for example, where warpage would be most problematic.

-- Murphy's Carpentry Corollary #3: Any board cut to length has a 50% probability of being too short.

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