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Coloration of Verawood (Bulnesia sarmientoi, arborea)

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Forum topic by DromSealis posted 12-13-2015 05:07 PM 639 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DromSealis

43 posts in 638 days


12-13-2015 05:07 PM

Hello,

I want to inquire about the green of Verawood.

1 – How long does it take to sit in the sun before it settles into its green color?

2 – As I understand that the “settle in” green is inconsistent from piece to piece (and that Verawood, as a colored lumber, is hardly all-green) , how do I seek those that will turn very green? What characteristics of these pieces might stand out? How do I request these from a lumber vendor? (If such extra information helps, I’m in contact primarily with ExoticWoodsUSA and GilmerWood.)

3 – After a piece “settles” into its green after a period of time, will it fade into a desaturated color after? Some seem to say it will, while others say it doesn’t, so I’m not exactly sure what to believe.

Thanks for your help.

edit –
here is what I’m looking for: the greenest pieces in this following picture

-- Drom


10 replies so far

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FancyShoes

509 posts in 829 days


#1 posted 12-21-2015 08:33 PM

That is some cool and interesting wood, I have never heard of this stuff. I will have to look it up. I hope you find your answers, if you dont find it here, can you post what you did find elswhere to share the knowledge?

What are you planning to make with it?

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DromSealis

43 posts in 638 days


#2 posted 12-21-2015 09:05 PM

I suppose these questions don’t actually have the kind of definitive answer that I was hoping it to. (Otherwise, more responses would have been made by this point.)
Well, I guess I should simply leave it to chance when I buy them.

And, FancyShoes, they are supposed to be the Black Army of my Steamed Pearwood and Verawood chess commission for my woodworker; who has way less knowledge of the wood than I do.

-- Drom

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HokieKen

1779 posts in 604 days


#3 posted 12-21-2015 09:25 PM

Just a thought… does your customer specifically want the verawood or just a deep green wood? If it’s the color and not the specific wood they’re after, you could just use a lighter colored hardwood and use green dye to get a consistent green across all of the pieces.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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DromSealis

43 posts in 638 days


#4 posted 12-21-2015 09:32 PM

@ HokieKen
I’m the customer; my woodworker is who I’m commissioning.
I would prefer using undyed real wood with their natural color.
Verawood is the greenest which I know of that, some report, works harmoniously with age; which is why I feel it is the perfect contrast to the Orange-peach-brown coloration of Pearwood.

-- Drom

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HokieKen

1779 posts in 604 days


#5 posted 12-21-2015 09:40 PM



@ HokieKen
I m the customer; my woodworker is who I m commissioning.
I would prefer using undyed real wood with their natural color.
Verawood is the greenest which I know of that, some report, works harmoniously with age; which is why I feel it is the perfect contrast to the Orange-peach-brown coloration of Pearwood.

- DromSealis

In that case, I guess the dye’s not an option. I missed that you were the customer. It’s good that you’re doing the research and know what you’re looking at and what its limitations are. This thread is the first I’ve ever even heard of Verawood but it certainly has a nice grain and coloration to it. I hope you’ll find someone somewhere who can answer your questions for you!

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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DromSealis

43 posts in 638 days


#6 posted 12-21-2015 10:50 PM

Thanks, HokieKen.

I’ve learned that, on this board, little people actually know about the wood. It’s an exotic wood species (actually “it” is two species.) to the USA, granted, but I would think that the wood is more commonplace amoung them. Evidently not. haha

The other name to Verawood is Argentine Lignum Vitae; which people sometimes falsly sell as Lignum Vitae. (Caveat Emptor = best friend, I suppose…)

-- Drom

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DromSealis

43 posts in 638 days


#7 posted 12-21-2015 10:51 PM

(duplicate post edited)

-- Drom

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Hammerthumb

2533 posts in 1440 days


#8 posted 12-21-2015 11:03 PM

Have you tried Eisenbran? 1-800-258-2587

-- Paul, Las Vegas

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DromSealis

43 posts in 638 days


#9 posted 12-22-2015 12:37 AM

I haven’t. Thanks for your suggestion, Hammerthumb.
Calling. ^-^

edit – Off for the holidays….

-- Drom

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DromSealis

43 posts in 638 days


#10 posted 01-19-2016 01:52 AM

It has been a while since I have spoken in this thread.

Right now, I have a new question: regarding international shipping.

Verawood, as I’ve learned, is on the Appendix II of the CITES. On the other hand, I’ve contacted FedEx several of times, and the international customs agents who took my calls all seem to say that, aside from a phytosanitary certificate, there shouldn’t be any problem shipping to India; the country of my woodworker’s company location.

I’m a bit a confused on this, since Verawood is on the CITES list. Will India actually receive my shipment of Verawood, or will it be ceased and distroyed? Where can I go to find this out for sure, because, as reassuring as FedEx sounds those times I called its customs agents, they do sound at least vaguely dubious.

Thanks again.

-- Drom

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