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Managing the noise generated by the Dust Collector

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Forum topic by sh2005 posted 01-09-2010 05:11 AM 1196 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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sh2005

97 posts in 2704 days


01-09-2010 05:11 AM

I have this 1 HP dust collector from Penn State Industries. It works great, but it is loud. Most of my power tools are loud, so this just adds more to the total noise. My ear muffs do their job, but it’s not really fair to my neighbors. So, I have been thinking about how I can mask some of the noise it makes. I have a small garage workshop, there’s no ductwork for it and the I need to be able to move the dust collector around the shop to connect to different machines. So, I don’t have the option to build a small room in the corner and operate the DC out of there.

There’s no muffler available for it. I have glued a sheet of foam to the inside surface of the round metal structure where the two bags are strapped on, hoping that would reduce some of the noise made by the air, but no luck. However, I did think of building a small enclosure inside which I can put the DC and make that enclosure mobile. Sort of building a room for the DC, but it would be on casters :) Before I embark on such an endeavor, I wanted to see if there are more effective (and maybe easier) thing to try.


12 replies so far

View Sawkerf's profile

Sawkerf

1730 posts in 2536 days


#1 posted 01-09-2010 05:46 AM

The majority of the noise you’re hearing is in the impeller chamber. Try draping a moving blanket over the impeller housing (don’t cover up the motor) and see if that doesn’t reduce the noise.

Be careful building DC enclosures. They need to be big enough to let you clean out your DC, and you’ll see quite a bit of dust buildup in the enclosure.

Did you steal my profile picture idea? – lol

-- Adversity doesn't build character...................it reveals it.

View Abbott's profile

Abbott

2570 posts in 2771 days


#2 posted 01-09-2010 07:13 AM

I built a small shed outside against the back wall of my shop. That’s where my DC lives.

-- Ohh mann...pancakes and boobies...I'll bet that's what Heaven is like! ♣ ♣ ♣ ♣

View FirehouseWoodworking's profile

FirehouseWoodworking

689 posts in 2740 days


#3 posted 01-09-2010 08:50 AM

I agree with what Sawkerf has told you. He’s spot-on.

Another thing you can do is to build the enclosure large enough that you can line it with glued on, cardboard egg carton bottoms. Don’t use the foam egg cartons, just the grey, paper/cardboard types. Cut the tops off (as well as the small locking flap) and glue them on with the bottom facing out.

The configuration of the individual egg holders as well as the recycled paper from which these cartons are made act as a sound absorbing material. I did this with a small mobile dust collector that I own and it helped considerably.

You’ll need to consume a lot of eggs, or ask a local restaurant if they’ll save you theirs. Commercial egg flats are often 2 or 3 dozen size.

Just a suggestion. So, how about scrambling an omlette?

Cheers!

-- Dave; Lansing, Kansas

View sh2005's profile

sh2005

97 posts in 2704 days


#4 posted 01-10-2010 06:00 PM

Sawkerf and Dave,
I will try the idea of covering up the impeller chamber with something heavy like movers blanket. And the idea of using egg carton is cool too. I was thinking of covering the inside of the enclosure with foams that look like egg carton, which helps disrupt the sound waves. But, I didn’t think of using actual egg carton. Maybe I will put a thin layer of foam like carpet padding underneath the cartons.

As for my profile pic, Sawkerf, it explains why none of my cuts are square…!! ha ha….. And Dave, thanks for mentioning about the omelette, I will have to remember to take the eggs out of the cartons before gluing the cartons…..

View Eric_S's profile

Eric_S

1551 posts in 2662 days


#5 posted 01-10-2010 06:27 PM

Sh2005, I have the same dilemma as you and have also posted about it. I too have been thinking about building a mobile closet DC enclosure for my garage workshop as well. I would line the interior walls with sound dampening foam. The only concerns I’ve had is that it would need to have a way for air to get out of the enclosure, so I was thinking of adding an exhaust port with multiple walls to the let the air out but keep the noise in. Also, the size of the enclosure would have to be large enough to have some air between the foam and DC so I’m not sure if it would fit in my garage but still be slim enough to sit along the side when we park our cars in there.

Does anyone know if I were to take apart the impeller chamber and spray the inside with a noise dampening spray (think truck bed liner, but some sort of insulation instead of a spray liner). Would this work well or would it restrict the suction? I would think as long as the impeller could still turn, there shouldn’t be an issue. Any thoughts?

-- - Eric Noblesville, IN

View whit's profile

whit

246 posts in 3444 days


#6 posted 01-10-2010 07:04 PM

Eric, the impeller and housing usually have a small clearance between them. If you spray a liner between them, it would likely change the dynamics (think COLLISION!!).

SH, check a truck parts place (the 4-letter one that bears the same name as the Napa valley wine region in CA – don’t want to be accused of favoritism, here). I needed a muffler for an exhaust system for a laser engraver (it’s basically a DC motor without the bags) and they had one that worked perfectly. 4” in and 4” out – unfortunately, it’s also 3’ long and about 12” in diameter. They do make smaller mufflers, though.

-- Even if to be nothing more than a bad example, everything serves a purpose. cippotus

View sh2005's profile

sh2005

97 posts in 2704 days


#7 posted 01-10-2010 07:36 PM

Whit,
The muffler is a good idea, but where should the muffler go? Most of the DC mufflers are placed after the impeller. Unfortunately, my DC doesn’t have a long enough (and removable) path between the impeller and the bags, so I can’t put a muffler in there.

Eric, as for adding the exhaust port, a muffler can be used :)

View whit's profile

whit

246 posts in 3444 days


#8 posted 01-10-2010 08:39 PM

Sorry, SH, it looked from the picture like the flange between the impeller housing output and the separator input was detachable. You are correct; the muffler does have to go after the impeller. Trying to put a muffler on a DC that isn’t designed to use on requires a bit of creativity. it’s a sort of bend-it-to-fit-and-paint-it-to-match philosophy.

-- Even if to be nothing more than a bad example, everything serves a purpose. cippotus

View iamwelty's profile

iamwelty

254 posts in 2583 days


#9 posted 01-10-2010 11:55 PM

Eric. I wouldn’t try your spray idea… I’m positive it would cause a premature death of your machine…

-- There is a fine line between eroticism and nausea...

View Eric_S's profile

Eric_S

1551 posts in 2662 days


#10 posted 01-11-2010 12:13 AM

Yeah I figured as much. It was just an idea I had.

-- - Eric Noblesville, IN

View sh2005's profile

sh2005

97 posts in 2704 days


#11 posted 01-11-2010 04:17 PM

Whit, if draping the impeller housing from outside doesn’t do a good enough job, I will try putting egg crate foams (or actual egg crate cartons as Dave suggested earlier) inside the impeller housing (after the blade of course) and the separator (where the bags are strapped on).

View Eric_S's profile

Eric_S

1551 posts in 2662 days


#12 posted 01-11-2010 06:25 PM

SH, please let me know if you find anything that does a good job at dampening the noise. Thanks.

-- - Eric Noblesville, IN

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