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Forum topic by dbw posted 12-12-2015 08:50 PM 755 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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dbw

143 posts in 1100 days


12-12-2015 08:50 PM

Topic tags/keywords: maple cupped straighten

Greetings all,
I need to know if any of y’all know of a way to PERMANENTLY straightening wood which is cupped along it’s length. The patient in question is a piece of soft maple which is 4/4 X 60” long X 8” wide. Any suggestions would be helpful.

-- measure 3 times, cut once


12 replies so far

View joey502's profile

joey502

487 posts in 981 days


#1 posted 12-12-2015 10:05 PM

I would doubt there will be any way to permanently flatten the board without milling it flat. Even after milling it may bow again.

What is your intended use for the board? How bad is the bow?

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1772 days


#2 posted 12-12-2015 11:00 PM

Cupped or bowed?

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View dbw's profile

dbw

143 posts in 1100 days


#3 posted 12-12-2015 11:08 PM

Thank you for the clarification. Bowed. I want to cut it into shorter pieces and I need to edge glue two pieces approximately 17” long to make a piece approximately 12” wide.

-- measure 3 times, cut once

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4028 posts in 1814 days


#4 posted 12-12-2015 11:13 PM

How bad is it bowed? If it is severe, there is not much you can do. I generally will cut boards like this into shorter lengths then mill out the bow and use them for short pieces in the project that call for shorter lengths. Then obtain some more suitable stock for the longer pieces.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1772 days


#5 posted 12-13-2015 12:03 AM

If you cut that board into 3 17’’ pieces the bow will be significantly less. Set your bowed 8×60’’ piece on edge and place a 17’’ straight edge of some sort against the bowed piece and leap frog the 17’’ straight edge down the piece looking and the gap at each location. The gap you see will be the amount of bow in each of the 17’’ piece. Let us know how much that is.

You say 4/4, is that in the rough or has it been planed to 3/4”

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

394 posts in 682 days


#6 posted 12-13-2015 12:40 AM

Running one face across a jointer then planing to thickness is the usual way to fatten a cupped, bowed, twisted board.
You need 2-17” long pieces. Personally I’d cut 2 pieces 20” long then do the above.

View lateralus819's profile

lateralus819

2236 posts in 1353 days


#7 posted 12-13-2015 12:50 AM

Grab a board stretcher from a box store. Should sort it out.

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

626 posts in 1415 days


#8 posted 12-13-2015 12:58 AM

Wood is wood and it moves. If you really mean all of the capital letters in your PERMANENTLY then you need to switch to machining metal or plastic and even then you might have trouble. With wood you get the dimensions that you make when you cut your pieces and you need to allow for any movement that will occur with changes over time. That is part and parcel of the craft. If everything was made out of plywood then anybody could cobble together one of the classic pieces of furniture. Understanding the movement of the wood and how it will affect the design of the piece is the key to success and it takes a lot of hard knocks. Ask anyone here about their “kindling bin”.

AlaskaGuy:: very nice picture showing the definition of the terms. I think “cupped” is one of the most misunderstood terms here.

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AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1772 days


#9 posted 12-13-2015 01:08 AM

He’s asking if it can be done without milling it. I have to assume that mean no ruining it across a jointer. Not sure how a board stretcher would work for this. I think his wood is long enough already.

I’ve jointed and planed plenty of wood that has stay flat for years and years.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View dbw's profile

dbw

143 posts in 1100 days


#10 posted 12-13-2015 05:40 AM

It’s 4/4 (7/8) where one side one edge have already been jointed. I don’t have a jointer and even if I did It would have to be an 8” (quality) jointer, which is out of my budget. By permanently I mean I don’t want the bow to creep back in after the project is finished. I understand wood moves and I have allowed for movement. I do have a planer except I don’t think I can use it to take the bow out because the rollers will temporarily flatten the board and I’ll wind up with a thinner board which will still be bowed.

-- measure 3 times, cut once

View Babieca's profile

Babieca

120 posts in 967 days


#11 posted 12-13-2015 06:09 AM

You can flatten on the planer using a sled with wedges under the board so the rollers will not flatten it. See this video.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8UONmuQt_98

As said above, you’ll want to do this after cutting your pieces to rough length to get a lot of the bow out that way.


It s 4/4 (7/8) where one side one edge have already been jointed. I don t have a jointer and even if I did It would have to be an 8” (quality) jointer, which is out of my budget. By permanently I mean I don t want the bow to creep back in after the project is finished. I understand wood moves and I have allowed for movement. I do have a planer except I don t think I can use it to take the bow out because the rollers will temporarily flatten the board and I ll wind up with a thinner board which will still be bowed.

- dbw


View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5765 posts in 949 days


#12 posted 12-13-2015 06:10 AM

bracing of a sort or mill it.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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