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Compare crosscut between 40T and 50T blades

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Forum topic by abehil posted 12-12-2015 08:01 PM 505 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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abehil

104 posts in 802 days


12-12-2015 08:01 PM

Topic tags/keywords: table saw question blade review

Is there any way to quantify the crosscut gotten from a 40T (D1040X) versus a 50T combo blade (D1050X)?

I would expect better ripping from the 40T to reduce burning on 1-5/8” stock for instance. But I can’t get a sense on how much better the crosscutting should be when using a 50T when reading about it.


7 replies so far

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conifur

955 posts in 614 days


#1 posted 12-12-2015 08:06 PM

It is not just about tooth count, a ribbing blade teeth or more like a chisel, cross cut are alternating angles to chew through the wood.

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

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conifur

955 posts in 614 days


#2 posted 12-12-2015 08:16 PM

check out the videos here
http://www.freudtools.com/

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

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knotscott

7210 posts in 2838 days


#3 posted 12-12-2015 10:25 PM

There are a lot of variables in play, and it’s hard to quantify. Tooth count is the most commonly recognized parameter, but there is also significant effect from the hook angle, top grind, side angles, side clearance, etc. There are also a bunch of additional variables in the material, the saw, technique, etc.

Those two blades are obviously of the same quality, and are intended for very similar applications. Considering that any general purpose/combination blade offers a design compromise from optimum performance in favor of versatility, I really wouldn’t worry too much about it….both are really good value blades, and either should be fine as an everyday all-purpose blade. Neither is going to excel at efficient ripping in thick stock, and neither is going to leave nearly perfect tear out free plywood or fine crosscuts. For ripping 1-5/8” stock you’d be better off with a 24T D1024X.

What saw do you have?

Tips for Picking Saw Blades

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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abehil

104 posts in 802 days


#4 posted 12-12-2015 10:51 PM

I should have mentioned that I am already getting a 24T for ripping.

I am trying to choose between a 40T and 50T combo and this choice will be on the saw most of the time. Because of that, I expect I will end up ripping with it when needing just a couple pieces. I want the luxury of being a little lazy. :)

I only cut plywood when I’m building a shop jig so tear out on that isn’t critical to me. Most of the time I’m working with soft woods, mainly cedar for now.

Currently I have an old Grizzly contractor saw. However, I’m buying a Delta 36-725 and that will be my TS for several years I hope. BTW, Lowes has it on 10% sale. Add in my coupon and I’m getting it at what I consider a good price, like around $460

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jbay

813 posts in 362 days


#5 posted 12-12-2015 10:55 PM

I’ve been using the Tenryu Gold Medal, 40 tooth, and it has proven to be a great all purpose blade.

-- My “MO” involves Judging others, playing God, acting as LJs law enforcement, and never admitting any of my ideas could possibly be wrong or anyone else's idea could possibly be correct -- (A1Jim)

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patcollins

1420 posts in 2328 days


#6 posted 12-12-2015 11:13 PM

I have a hard time telling the difference in the cuts between a 40T general purpose and a 50T combo blade. Personally I think the 40T general purpose blade is a better choice and when I want really good crosscuts I use a 60T blade.

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knotscott

7210 posts in 2838 days


#7 posted 12-12-2015 11:15 PM


I should have mentioned that I am already getting a 24T for ripping.
...
- abehil

If I were in your shoes, since you’ve got the 24T covered, I think I’d grab the 60T D1060X and use that for all but the really thick ripping. The 1060 has a steeper hook angle on it than most 60T blades, so it’s actually pretty reasonable in ripping to an inch or so…maybe more depending on the material, but most cedar cuts pretty easily. It’ll leave a cleaner edge than the 40T or 50T, and is definitely the better crosscut blade. For those moments when you want to be lazy and rip thicker stock with it, try raising the blade a little higher…if you keep in clean and sharp, it might surprise you.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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