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Forum topic by DaveA posted 01-08-2010 08:58 PM 928 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DaveA

46 posts in 2548 days


01-08-2010 08:58 PM

I am currently toying with the idea of creating an Oak and Walnut checkerboard for a school auction. I generally have an idea of what I want it to look like with the two woods forming the light and dark squares.

My question concerns layout. The squares are tentatively planned to be on the sidegrain and surrounded with some type of trim. Should I lay out the individual squares with the grain all in the same direction or would there be a benefit to alternating direction. My concern is warpage and since it’s a benefit, I don’t want to some day hear about what “happened” to the checkerboard.

Thanks in advance for any advice on this.

-- Dave - Milwaukee


4 replies so far

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WibblyPig

168 posts in 2741 days


#1 posted 01-08-2010 09:23 PM

I’d lay it out alternating the light and dark grain (light “vertical”, dark “horizontal”). I’d then glue or screw the center 4 squares of the finished board to a piece of plywood and then float the entire panel inside a frame to allow for expansion/contraction. Don’t glue the entire panel to the plywood as that will prevent free movement.

(actually, I’d build the whole thing out of veneer, but then again, I’m a veneer whore)

-- Steve, Webster Groves, MO "A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they know they shall never sit in."

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DaveA

46 posts in 2548 days


#2 posted 01-08-2010 11:05 PM

I am not sure I understand the meaning of letting the squares “float” in a frame.

I have veneer in the basement and could cut little squares of that and glue them down. I, admittedly, may not have the skill to work with veneer in such small sizes. What is your quick and easy lesson on cutting veneer as you did on that chessboard? (Which BTW, is exactly what I am aiming for)

-- Dave - Milwaukee

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WibblyPig

168 posts in 2741 days


#3 posted 01-09-2010 05:40 AM

Here’s a good primer for veneer:

http://www.redbridgemarquetrygroup.org/Geometric_Designs.htm

To float the panel in the frame means that the entire board (squares and plywood) would be sitting inside a slot in the frame but not glued into the slot so it’s floating or free to move. So basically, the frame is glued together but not to the panel that’s inside.

-- Steve, Webster Groves, MO "A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they know they shall never sit in."

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DaveA

46 posts in 2548 days


#4 posted 01-09-2010 06:14 AM

I’ll take a look at the tutorial and maybe do an experimental version first. Thanks for the tips.

-- Dave - Milwaukee

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