LumberJocks

Dewalt 735 planner problems

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by DavidTTU posted 12-12-2015 06:46 PM 827 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View DavidTTU's profile

DavidTTU

115 posts in 1096 days


12-12-2015 06:46 PM

I have an almost brand new Dewalt 735. I had it put away for several months and got it out today to work on some projects. When I try planning a board it is as if the front roller has sagged. The depth gauge is no longer registering and my work piece is slamming into the front roller without coming into contact with the blades. This is causing lots of friction and the work piece will not push through. I checked to see if the blades were set up well and I believe they are. There really isnt much adjustment with the blades. Is it possible that my roller has sagged? Or is there a way to raise it? Any help would be appreciated.

Problem summarized. the work piece is hitting the rollers and not the blades. The only way to get the blades to come in contact with the work piece is by putting a far to deep of cut based off where it is hitting the rollers. Everything mechanically is operating perfectly.

Do you think this is a roller problem, blade adjustment problem, or a table problem?

I tried it with several flat workpieces, it is not because they are twisted.


7 replies so far

View gwilki's profile

gwilki

121 posts in 934 days


#1 posted 12-12-2015 10:22 PM

Is the chain running on all four sprockets?

I’m assuming that it was working fine when you put it away, so this is a bit weird.

-- Grant Wilkinson, Ottawa ON

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

4853 posts in 2274 days


#2 posted 12-12-2015 10:59 PM

As far as the planer not pulling stock through, the most common causes are dull blades and friction against the tables. For that part of the problem, wax the planer beds and replace the blades. I was getting 200 b.f. or less per blade change, which is why I switched to a Shelix head.

The gauge not working could be a separate problem. I had a splinter of wood jam in my material removal gauge once, and it quit working. Clearing the debris and cleaning it with compressed air solved the problem.

Try raising the cutterhead for a lighter cut. Repeat this until the board feeds through.

If all this fails, I fear you may have a more serious problem. However 90% of problems with this planer can be fixed with cleaning, waxing the beds, and flipping or replacing the blades. I have found that dull planer blades look and feel the same as sharp ones, but they won’t let the lumber feed through. The infeed roller will grab the lumber, but can’t move the lumber because the blades are dull.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View Ub1chris's profile

Ub1chris

85 posts in 841 days


#3 posted 12-13-2015 02:29 AM


I was getting 200 b.f. or less per blade change, which is why I switched to a Shelix head.

- pintodeluxe


200 BF per blade change? Your blades must have been made of cheese.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

4853 posts in 2274 days


#4 posted 12-13-2015 06:35 AM

Ub1chris,
The stock Dewalt 735 blades are absolute garbage. They cut clean, but nick easily and dull very quickly.
Upgrading to the Shelix was the best change for me. It’s been a year now, and I haven’t even rotated the cutter inserts yet. I was dropping $55 every time I walked through the tool aisle at Lowes. Now I just smile and walk on by.
I usually mill figured white oak and big leaf maple, so people who work with softer woods may get more mileage from their blades.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

1056 posts in 1450 days


#5 posted 12-13-2015 01:46 PM

I probably ran 800 board feet of mostly oak through mine before flipping the blades. Depth of cut has everything to do with blade life in the 735. I try not to take more than a 1/32, 1/2 turn, for each pass. Granted it can take a while if one is wanting to remove substantial thickness.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

4853 posts in 2274 days


#6 posted 12-15-2015 05:08 PM

The results I mentioned were with 1/32” depth of cut.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

1056 posts in 1450 days


#7 posted 12-15-2015 09:53 PM

Cant explain a 4 to 1 difference in blade life. My experience is with kiln dried common red oak with knots and all, but it is clean – no dirt or rocks.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com