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Forum topic by Slatewear posted 12-10-2015 11:33 PM 967 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Slatewear

6 posts in 364 days


12-10-2015 11:33 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I was offered a free lathe. Because it’s free, I said sure. Going to pick it up next week. Still haven’t seen it in person. I have never owned a lathe before. can anyone identify it?
http://i1175.photobucket.com/albums/r635/brianigielski/th_351DDF50-BB45-4916-BA91-B2029D7648BE_zpsslgkve3x.jpg

http://i1175.photobucket.com/albums/r635/brianigielski/th_D7D5A007-B7EC-4A11-9FD2-24B633B9C62D_zpsumwdp4fr.jpg


18 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4231 posts in 1664 days


#1 posted 12-10-2015 11:47 PM

Can’t tell for sure, but it looks like an old Atlas metal lathe or maybe even a older South Bend that has been modified to use a v-belt instead of flat belts, and might be missing a few parts (the saddle has been removed for one… but it might be in pieces behind the lathe). It was a metal turning lathe, but looks like it’s been used for wood. Not really great for wood though, although it can be done within limits.

You can go over to the Vintagemachinery site and browse through the photo index to see if you can find a similar one to match against.

For the price, it’s well worth it… even if you can’t get it working right, many of the parts are pretty valuable to those restoring them.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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Ripthorn

1406 posts in 2450 days


#2 posted 12-11-2015 12:13 AM

That is actually an old metal working lathe that has been converted to be used for wood. It looks to be a nice old Atlas or similar. They have removed the carriage and cross slide and installed a tool rest. It will have a much wider range of speeds than a wood lathe with pulleys, likely going from about 200 to 2500 RPM or so. Be warned that it will be very heavy. If you got the correct carriage and cross slide, it would probably be worth $1000 as long as it’s in reasonable shape.

-- Brian T. - Exact science is not an exact science

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tomd

2027 posts in 3235 days


#3 posted 12-11-2015 12:28 AM

Very nice metal lathe.

-- Tom D

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MrUnix

4231 posts in 1664 days


#4 posted 12-11-2015 12:38 AM

I really hate photobucket, so here is the image:

The more I look at it, the more it looks like a South Bend… although there were several clones made that are quite similar… but the feet, gear cover and tailstock scream South Bend. It also looks like a taper attachment laying in front of the lathe. And who knows what may be in the drawers and in all those parts laying behind the lathe. You got pretty lucky… it may be worth $1000 if fully restored, but even in it’s current condition, I’ve seen similar ones being sold in worse condition for several hundred or more.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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SirIrb

1239 posts in 696 days


#5 posted 12-11-2015 01:07 AM

+1 for atlas. Headstock swooshy look tells the tale for me.

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

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MrUnix

4231 posts in 1664 days


#6 posted 12-11-2015 02:22 AM


+1 for atlas. Headstock swooshy look tells the tale for me.

- SirIrb

Ok, I’m going with a SB9 Model B (auto carriage and cross feed, manual change gear) v-belt version (aka: catalog number 544) or a very, very close clone – unless proven otherwise :)

Here is a model B, but with flat belts instead of V-belts:

(Photo from the vintagemachinery site)

I have a model 415 (pre-cursor to the SB9 model C), and the similarities are just too great.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: Plus, I’ve never seen an Atlas that had a rounded apron like the South Bend has… they are all sort of square looking.

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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Slatewear

6 posts in 364 days


#7 posted 12-11-2015 02:22 PM

Thanks to all who replied. Very good information. I will be picking it up tomorrow, and will spend the weekend getting to know her a little better. If anyone is interested, I can post more pictures and/or solve her identity.

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4456 posts in 3426 days


#8 posted 12-11-2015 02:31 PM

You’ll be pickin’ it up? NOT! Maybe you and two others. :)
Hernia time’s a’comin’.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

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Slatewear

6 posts in 364 days


#9 posted 12-11-2015 02:54 PM



You ll be pickin it up? NOT! Maybe you and two others. :)
Hernia time s a comin .
Bill

- Bill White

Getting it loaded into the pick up with a fork lift. However, there will only be two of us when it gets to it’s destination. How much do you think that would weigh? 400 lbs.?

It’s going to stay in the garage. If I needed to, I would use a hoist to unload from the truck

View SirIrb's profile

SirIrb

1239 posts in 696 days


#10 posted 12-11-2015 03:08 PM

The more machines I rebuild the more I know that my next needs to be a nice metal lathe. There is just to much round steel that needs to be fabricated or remade or just spun at high RPM and hit with 800 grit to make it mice and polished to not have a lathe.

I need one. Oh no, I dont want one (what I will tell the senorita) I need one. [spends an hour talking about how I can amortize the price of a lathe in the span of one year compared to getting parts made] “Shut up, Steve. Dont you have a machine to rebuild?”

Really nice lathe to get. Keep us updated.

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4231 posts in 1664 days


#11 posted 12-11-2015 09:32 PM

The lathe itself (bed, headstock, tailstock and carriage) is probably close to around 300 pounds give or take…but by the time you add in the countershaft, motor, cabinet and other odd bits and pieces, maybe 500 or more. You can break it down to move easier though…. even just removing the lathe from the stand will probably allow two people to move it, although the countershaft will have to remain as you can’t take the belt off without either pulling the spindle out or disassembling the countershaft. If the belt looks like it might need to be replaced, it would be easier to just cut it.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Bluepine38's profile

Bluepine38

3341 posts in 2550 days


#12 posted 12-12-2015 03:43 PM

That is definiteiy worth picking up and bringing home. Make sure you take plenty of straps to hold those
drawers in and keep the lathe steady. Once you get it home, you can take the worst of it apart to get
it unloaded. Please keep us posted on what you have there. You will probably find name plates and
model info on it somewhere.

-- As ever, Gus-the 77 yr young apprentice carpenter

View Slatewear's profile

Slatewear

6 posts in 364 days


#13 posted 12-12-2015 09:20 PM

Pickup the lathe today. Lots and lots of stuff with it. It’s a South Bend. model 89w it looks like. If someone has a better way to post pics, other than photobucket, I’m all ears. Got a bunch of pics.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4231 posts in 1664 days


#14 posted 12-12-2015 10:32 PM

89W? AFAIK, they never used a “W” in any of their designations (or 89 that I’m aware of)... where did you get that?
Pretty sure it’s a SB9 (“Workshop”) series B… it has the front oil cups under the spindle unlike previous versions where they were on top of the bearing caps, the gear cover door has the little tab on front, and it is lacking the quick change gear box, but does have the cross-feed engagement lever on the apron. If you have the threading guide or any other data plates on the lathe, post a picture… it should tell you the swing (eg: 9”) and bed length (eg: 3 foot) and maybe a catalog number. You can post them directly here using the “Img” button above the reply box. You may need to resize them to meet the size requirement, and 800×600 works well.

I wouldn’t run it at all until you give it a good going over. They are oil hungry beasts, and the spindle should be just a plain bearing bore in the cast iron (ie: there are no bearings per se, it just rides on the machined cast iron). If you run it for any length of time without proper lube and adjustment, you will toast the spindle bearing surfaces and score the spindle. It is designed to run with a thin layer of oil between the spindle and cast iron bore, and clearance is critical. First thing to do would be to pull the spindle and check the bearing surfaces, give it a good cleaning (including ensuring all the oil passages are not clogged up from sitting idle) and then adjust the bearing blocks for proper clearance.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: There are a lot of South Bend resources out there if you look, including a Yahoo! group devoted to them. You can also find the serial number stamped into the bed… front right between the V-ways. That will help you date it… it was most likely built in the early to mid 40’s, but the serial number will help narrow it down a bit.

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Slatewear's profile

Slatewear

6 posts in 364 days


#15 posted 12-12-2015 11:52 PM

Brad, I’d plate says
South Bend
Precision Lathe
model B9W.
Catalog no. 577A.
Bed length 4,
chart no. 5

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