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Laminated Gun Stock – What resin/glue to use?

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Forum topic by SlowDraw posted 01-08-2010 12:48 AM 12118 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SlowDraw

5 posts in 2522 days


01-08-2010 12:48 AM

Topic tags/keywords: laminate laminated gun stock glue resin question

I am looking at building a custom laminated wood stock for a Ruger 10/22. I have done lots of research on how laminated stocks are produced and how one can build their own, but have yet to find any real leads on what should be used to bind it all together. Some people have used wood glue and some have said to have used resins. Does anyone have suggestions on what I should be using, and more specifically what brand and where to buy it. I need the product to be waterproof, and rock solid with no weird tendencies like shrinking or expanding. It also needs to cure to a clear or no visible state. Any help for this young rook would be appreciated.

Laminate with Glue or Resin?

What kind?

What Brand?

Where can I buy it?

-- Slow Draw


8 replies so far

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DrDirt

4167 posts in 3203 days


#1 posted 01-08-2010 12:50 AM

I would go with Titebond III since it will be waterproof(Weatherproof) once dry.
Epoxy is also great, but easy to overclamp and hard to get a nice glue line on a gunstock, hence I would stay with the dark wood glue

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

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SlowDraw

5 posts in 2522 days


#2 posted 01-08-2010 01:01 AM

How do you “overclamp” when using epoxy. Excuse my lack of knowledge….kind of a rook at this type of project.

-- Slow Draw

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DrDirt

4167 posts in 3203 days


#3 posted 01-08-2010 01:54 AM

Epoxies tend to absorb very slowly, so it is easy to clamp down too much and squeeze glue out of the joint…Too loose doesnt really hurt structurally because the epoxy is strong enough but the glue line is more visible.
conversely – the water based wood glues, it is nearly impossible to overclamp , as it soaks in, and the bone relies on intimate fiber to fiber wood contact, so while some talk about glue starvation – that is more of an ‘old wives tale’ for white/yellow glues, as the pressure required to starve the joint is at or above the pressure needed to physically crush the wood fibers themselves. So if you havent destroyed your piece ….you didn’t overclamp it.
For epoxy though it take smore care, and the waterproof nature is neither that critical, because a rifle will never soak in water for long periods, the stock has a finish protecting it, and the amount of joint that is actually exposed is very small. ..and the TB III already has the waterproof rating. Finally, the stress is very small compared to say an arts and crafts barstool – - no 300 pounders testing the joint for you.

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

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SlowDraw

5 posts in 2522 days


#4 posted 01-08-2010 02:01 AM

Thanks for the clarification Dave. I had heard about “Glue Starvation”, but never really knew what it meant or if it was even relevant to my type of projects. Your take on water exposure is also very helpful, as I was thinking along the same lines. I would hate to go through the pain staking labor to only find that my stock would fall apart due to a misunderstanding of wood glue shortfalls. As you had detailed, this should not be the case, and the stock finish alone should be enough to protect any water damage (not to mention the waterproof rating of Titebond III).

First post on this site, and I am already reaping the benefits.

Any other opinions out there, as I am picking up what Dave is putting down.

-- Slow Draw

View Ger21's profile

Ger21

1047 posts in 2592 days


#5 posted 01-08-2010 03:01 AM

Plastic resin glue will give you more working time, but will leave a dark glue line.

-- Gerry, http://www.thecncwoodworker.com/index.html http://www.jointcam.com

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HeirloomWoodworking

238 posts in 3201 days


#6 posted 01-08-2010 03:03 AM

As a BIG gun nut, I love it when Lumberjocks post their custom stock projects.

Some of the nicest I have seen here have been posted by lumberjock HalDougherty
I would think he could help you with your questions.

Keep us up to date on your progress. Good Luck
Trev

-- Trevor Premer Head Termite and Servant to the Queen - Heirloom Woodworking

View SlowDraw's profile

SlowDraw

5 posts in 2522 days


#7 posted 01-08-2010 06:14 PM

Trevor, I am familiar with HalDougherty’s posts. I think it was his posts that lead me to stumble onto this website. His rifle stocks are awesome, and the info he provides is complete and informative. I have pulled many ideas from his sharing on the topic. I almost considered just ordering a stock from him…but where is the fun in that…were all wood workers here right! Plus, my project will be slightly un-ordinary, as I want to build a Bull-Pup design (where the receiver of the rifle is moved back to the shoulder and inletting into the stock so to reduce the overall length of the rifle without sacrificing barrel length). Allot of extra challenges in this type of project, but I think I have the designed worked out….now its all about learning the limitations and techniques to properly build it out of a laminate blank.

As for my original question, it looks as though a high end waterproof wood glue is going to be my best bet. Now I just need to find some time and money to get the rubber on the road and get started.

-- Slow Draw

View Karson's profile

Karson

35035 posts in 3862 days


#8 posted 01-11-2010 10:48 PM

You would need epoxy glue if you were glueing up some exotic wood that has oils in the wood. Rosewoods would be an example.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware soon moving to Virginia karsonwm@gmail.com †

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