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humble dw735x brag and a question about some damage

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Forum topic by bayouwood posted 12-10-2015 02:28 PM 564 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bayouwood

22 posts in 376 days


12-10-2015 02:28 PM

Got a dewalt planer dw735x from ebay new in box for a good price. I was slightly crestfallen to see that the seller missed some old damage that occurred in storage. The tear on the box is well weathered, that’s how I knew it didn’t happen on its way to me. I didnt want to return it because I had been hunting a deal on a 735 for what seemed like forever. The seller was completely awesome and gave me a nice little partial refund, because, correct me if I’m wrong: the planer works fine. There is a slight raised bit on the very back of the planer, but 2 inches behind that, the bed is perfectly flat. This is all beyond the rollers, by the way. I figured whats important is that the bed is perfectly flat in the space between the rollers. I did a test run through the trouble spot on a 2×4 and the digital caliper showed a diference side to side of like .002” or something.

and man they werent kidding when they said the fan assisted dust port is like a snow blower!


9 replies so far

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

6570 posts in 1614 days


#1 posted 12-10-2015 02:34 PM

If it still works fine and you don’t mind it, then run it and forget about it.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View distrbd's profile

distrbd

2227 posts in 1910 days


#2 posted 12-10-2015 03:18 PM

Like jmartel says if it does not interfere with the function of the planer, just use it, you’ll soon forget about it.

I had the same kind of damage on my Dewalt 735 but it was the handle on the left side that was damaged ,looked very much like the damage in your last picture, I wasn’t about to return that heavy planer just because of it, instead , I repaired it using JB weld and some spray paint, that was 2 years ago ,I honestly forgot about it until I read your thread .
Repair it and enjoy using it, it’s a great planer.

-- Ken from Ontario, Canada

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bayouwood

22 posts in 376 days


#3 posted 12-10-2015 03:22 PM

honestly i dont even think it needs repair. i gave the bed a smack a few times in that spot with a rubber mallet. its a hair flatter, but i doesnt matter. with the outfeed table on, it’s out of sight, out of mind.

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bayouwood

22 posts in 376 days


#4 posted 12-10-2015 03:23 PM

the base is cast aluminum, so it wont rust, but can it oxidize/corrode otherwise? should i JB weld that spot?

View distrbd's profile

distrbd

2227 posts in 1910 days


#5 posted 12-10-2015 03:44 PM

I would lightly sand it just to make the surface rough, glue,wait 24 hours,sand and spray the same colour.

-- Ken from Ontario, Canada

View CharleyL's profile

CharleyL

197 posts in 2828 days


#6 posted 12-10-2015 03:59 PM

I don’t think that dent is going to affect anything, except maybe catch on clothing as you try to move the planer around. If you got a really good deal on it I would just keep it. Replacing that piece would be major work if you could even get a new one.

Heres a bit of information about my DeWalt 735 planer purchase, early experience with chip collection, and my method of making the planer easier for me to move around. It may help.

My normal planing location is in the driveway because of the mess that planers make, and my shop is small so I normally don’t try to use my planers inside my shop, but when I first upgraded to the 735 I just had to try it out.

While unpacking it I discovered how heavy it really was. But then there it was, just sitting there nice and clean and new on my workbench in the middle of my 14 X 26 shop. Having just removed it from the box and moved all of the box and packing material out of the way, I just had to try it. So I plugged it in, grabbed a 2’ piece of 2 X 6 and fed it in. The chips coming out of the planer hit the wall about 10’ away without gravity having much affect on them at all. What a mess!!! I resigned to having to find a way to better manage the chips and also find a way to easily move this heavy planer around by myself without getting hurt.

Before I used it again it was very obvious that doing something about chip collection for it was an “absolute must” and I ordered the dust collection hose/barrel cover option for it. I also bought a miter saw/planer stand that folds into a hand truck style frame so it can easily be moved. Having to pick up only one end of this stand to move this heavy planer around, and being able to stand it on end to store it is what made my decision to buy this stand over the others that were available. At about 95 lbs, I didn’t want to try carrying this planer around by it’s handles by myself any more than absolutely necessary. It was almost twice as heavy as the Delta Planer that I had been using.

The Delta stand that I bought, folds easily into a hand truck shape, so it moves and stores easily on it’s end with the planer still attached to it (this stand is now a better designed model that is now sold by DeWalt) so I don’t need any help to easily move it and set it up. I roll it out of the shop and set it’s handle down on the ground, push a lever and lift the planer and table part of it and the planer easily into it’s working position where it locks in position (There are gas springs in the table frame that help with the lifting). Then I hook up the dust hose and put the barrel cover over a large trash barrel and plug the planer into the power source. The blower in the 735 planer does a fantastic job of keeping the planer clear of chips, and if the barrel cover stays on the barrel, my driveway and my neighbors pool stay clean too.

When finished planing, the hose/barrel cover collapses down to about 4” X 12” again. One push of the locking lever and a slight lift of the stand, then I lower it back down to fold it back into it’s hand truck shape / transporting position. A lift of the end handle and I can roll it on it’s two wheels, hand truck style, back into my shop, leaving it standing on it’s end in the corner of the shop with the hose/barrel cover option sitting loose on the top of the, still attached, planer and it all takes up less than 3 sq ft of floor space when stored this way.

Charley

View bayouwood's profile

bayouwood

22 posts in 376 days


#7 posted 12-10-2015 04:05 PM

thanks charley, I had seen the dewalt cart before. But I made my own before I got it. Here it is pictured with the first planer I bought and returned. Its got locking casters. The dust port will soon be hooked up to my dust deputy and shopvac cart I am building.

anyway the outfeed on the 735x lines up perfectly with my workbench so I can plane long boards pretty easily.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

4855 posts in 2277 days


#8 posted 12-10-2015 05:29 PM

Here’s the great thing… once you get the optional table extensions and set them correctly, the lumber won’t even reference the damaged area of your planer. Set the extension tables 3/32” higher at the far ends (tables forms a shallow “V” shape) to avoid any snipe.

Good luck.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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bayouwood

22 posts in 376 days


#9 posted 12-10-2015 05:31 PM

Pinto, thats exactly what I found. Mine came with the table extensions and extra blades. All for 460 shipped after damage refund!

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