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2 1/4" thick butcher block bowing...

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Forum topic by ARTTdylan posted 01-06-2010 11:06 PM 8165 views 0 times favorited 34 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ARTTdylan

73 posts in 2526 days


01-06-2010 11:06 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I made a 8’x7’ 2 1/4” thick edge up butcher block with maple and dark walnut. 6 months after delivery it bowed up in the middle more than 1”. I did not warranty such a block but told the customer I would do what I could to fix it. We planed it and cut it into three pieces and glued it back together. When we took off the clamps it was bowed the opposite way.

Is there a remedy?

-- Dylan - www.arttwood.com -


34 replies so far

View Gary's profile

Gary

8968 posts in 2897 days


#1 posted 01-06-2010 11:25 PM

Build a new one and watch the grain direction

-- Gary, DeKalb Texas only 4 miles from the mill

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TopamaxSurvivor

17671 posts in 3140 days


#2 posted 01-07-2010 02:13 AM

That is what I would do. I never leave a disatisfied customer to complain about my work.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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pmayer

864 posts in 2529 days


#3 posted 01-07-2010 03:46 AM

I am having a hard time visualizing this, and I am not quick to say start over from scratch because if you don’t get to the bottom of understanding the problem, it could happen again. Some things that I would be considering:

- is it fastened to something that can help hold it stable? Can it be fastened in the middle to help to maintain flatness?

- is it finished evenly on top and bottom? Could it be that the greater amount of moisture on the top is causing it to bow?

- can source of the bow be isolated to a single board or small number of boards that can be replaced? One or two boards with stress or moisture imbalance can cause dramatic problems in a panel that size.

- If this is mounted on a table or stand, could you possible bolt an iron bracket to the bottom, drilling elongated holes into the bracket which allow the wood panel to expand and contract? A thick angle iron could stabilize this panel if the bow is gentle. 1” is a lot, but over a span of 8’ it might be manageable with some heavy duty hardware.

-- PaulMayer, http://www.vernswoodgoods.com

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Tim Dahn

1511 posts in 3029 days


#4 posted 01-07-2010 04:09 AM

Can you post pictures? That may help in understanding from this end.

-- Good judgement comes from experience and experience comes from poor judgement.

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a1Jim

115202 posts in 3041 days


#5 posted 01-07-2010 04:12 AM

Depending on how much bow you could send it through a drum sanders

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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Broglea

677 posts in 2554 days


#6 posted 01-07-2010 04:33 AM

How is the customer maintaining the board? Are they letting it soak in water or running it through the dishwasher? Boards should stay relatively dry.

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childress

841 posts in 3006 days


#7 posted 01-07-2010 09:32 AM

Do people even read posts….it’s a counter and it’s 8 FEET BY 7 FEET. nothing you can “soak” or throw in the “dishwasher”.

Sorry, had to say something. but my suggestion is to run some sort of stringers underneath to help keep flat. But also doing so in a way to allow for movement. tricky when working with such large pieces. I like tha angle iron suggestions by pmayer.

-- Childress Woodworks

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poopiekat

4225 posts in 3198 days


#8 posted 01-07-2010 04:13 PM

Who builds a butcher block counter-top that’s 8 feet by 7 feet? That’s just crazy.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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Moron

5032 posts in 3357 days


#9 posted 01-07-2010 04:29 PM

newtons law of physics

for every action there is an equall and opposite reaction and when applied to a counter/butcher block of that size you can do a few things, but not limited to the following

: make sure the wood is dry from the get go
: watch grain direction albeit experience has shown me that it makes little difference
: allow the top to “float” in the that the underside shouldnt be covered by another surface, elevate it
: whatever finish is applied to the exposed top surface must be applied to the bottom surface in equall amounts to the top…........that is critical, because the top will absorb moisture, the covered bottom woint and thus….....severe warping.

NO BUTCHER BLOCK manufacturer warrenties a counter that size, and that should be thoroughly expalined to the client before they purchase it.

Good Luck

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

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Moron

5032 posts in 3357 days


#10 posted 01-07-2010 04:30 PM

poopie cat…................lots of places make butcher blocks that size, even bigger including me.

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

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poopiekat

4225 posts in 3198 days


#11 posted 01-07-2010 05:10 PM

OK roman, but this whole thread doesn’t make sense. We’re expected to believe that someone wants an 8’ x 7’ counter. It just sounds like an incredibly inefficient waste of space to have a horizontal surface that big, whether commercial or home use…unless it’s a floor. Possibly, a conference table but, come on! Awesome too, to think how they magically shrunk it down to fit through a doorway. Architecturally, it strains credibility. And on top of that, it’s ‘edge-up butcher block’? I’d want it to be 8” to 10” thick, in order to assure structural integrity for that size, but then it would weigh a ton! Man, I really think someone is trying to pull our chain! Or maybe the dimensions were typo’d in the OP.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View cliffton's profile

cliffton

117 posts in 2545 days


#12 posted 01-07-2010 05:24 PM

what i have seen with counters that size, “L” shaped, is that they dont glue them at all. you mount all your pieces in a tight fitting frame to allow the wood to move and shift. the counter still looks like a single piece but its not. when your dealing with sizes like that you have really take into account the minute shifts in each piece of wood. .001 on each individual piece has a neglible affect at ~12 inches but multiply that by eight and add in the fact that every shift is going to multiply, your going to have a huge problem keeping it straight.

and ditto, pics would help allot.

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cabinetmaster

10874 posts in 3022 days


#13 posted 01-07-2010 05:36 PM

poopikat, evidently you have not seen some of the Kitchen and Bath magazines lately. It is amazing how many people have huge kitchens now with an Island that big or larger. Bit I have to agree that a top that big would be hard to Warranty.

-- Jerry--A man can never have enough tools or clamps

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poopiekat

4225 posts in 3198 days


#14 posted 01-07-2010 05:55 PM

cabinetmaster,
It’s hard not to jump to conclusions, once you follow his link. This question was not posed by an amateur, but someone who is in the business of fabricating large butcher-blocks, yep, specifically up to 8’ by 7’. This is what they do professionally, but cannot anticipate wood movement? A custom project requiring a strong engineering background. The fact that their website specifically mentions 8’ by 7’ butcherblock tells me that they’re churning up exposure for their business, in a round-about way, by posting a query here. It’s the top hit in Google now, with the LJ post #4. Mission accomplished.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View ARTTdylan's profile

ARTTdylan

73 posts in 2526 days


#15 posted 01-07-2010 05:55 PM

PoopieKat, it was built for an island. The top actually pulled the cabinet it was sitting on apart.

Roman: Customer did not finish the bottom as instructed. They used the pour on urethane on top. As I read on I see that the culprit must be that they did not finish the bottom.

“whatever finish is applied to the exposed top surface must be applied to the bottom surface in equall amounts to the top…” – Is mineral oil enough of a barrier? I thought about recommending to future customers finishing the bottom with urethane even if they are using mineral oil on the top. Since mineral oil is supposed to be applied around once a month it is not likely that someone will every apply a second coat to the bottom of their installed counter top.

I appreciate the feedback.

I didn’t take a picture of it after it crooked but here is a picture just before we sent it out.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/46295436@N07/4254261002/

-- Dylan - www.arttwood.com -

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