LumberJocks

Fabric veneer

  • Advertise with us

« back to Finishing forum

Forum topic by Clint Searl posted 12-07-2015 08:00 PM 630 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Clint Searl's profile

Clint Searl

1533 posts in 1822 days


12-07-2015 08:00 PM

I want to veneer cotton fabric to a pair of 15×48 doors that I’m refinishing. The doors have been prepared with a ground coat of latex/acrylic wall paint. The final finish will be waterborne lacquer (Target EM 6000). I’d appreciate any thoughts on what to use to adhere the fabric that will be permanent and compatible with the lacquer. TIA

-- Clint Searl....Ya can no more do what ya don't know how than ya can git back from where ya ain't been


8 replies so far

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3548 posts in 1228 days


#1 posted 12-08-2015 12:40 AM

Hi Clint,
I think any natural fabric like burlap would work. If it is close net/woven, Probably contact cement. I would do a test before going for it. I suppose the door won’t be exposed to weather.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View MNgary's profile

MNgary

295 posts in 1878 days


#2 posted 12-11-2015 03:02 AM

3M trim adhesive, product id: 08074.

You will need to test a small piece to see if your lacqer will affect it, tho. I would try thin coats of the lacquer so it sets up on/in the fabric instead of saturating the fabric so the lacquer comes in contact with the adhesive.

-- I dream of the world where a duck can cross the road and no one asks why.

View Mark Kornell's profile

Mark Kornell

1061 posts in 1991 days


#3 posted 12-12-2015 06:46 AM

Regular yellow or white glue works very well as adhesive to join natural-fibre fabric (cotton/sisal/burlap etc.) to wood. The key things are that the wood must be raw, not finished, so the glue adheres to the wood. And that the glue impregnates the fabric all the way through, so you’d need to be topcoating with something pigmented.

If.are looking to have the fabric as the finished surface on top of a painted surface, I’d try a water-based paste adhesive. Either the craft-store type or a wallpaper adhesive.

-- Mark Kornell, Kornell Wood Design

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

2410 posts in 1975 days


#4 posted 12-12-2015 01:01 PM

I’d use Titebond III spread really thin. I’d sand the latex before to give it a better grip.

Waterproof, has a really long set time so you can work out any problems with the fabric, and should be impervious to any chemicals in the waterborne lacquer. It does dry with a amber tint, though. That might be a show-stopper.

How thin is the cotton fabric? A lot of what is being suggested might migrate through the cotton, changing the color and texture of the fabric.

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2190 posts in 941 days


#5 posted 12-12-2015 03:02 PM

Contact cement you would have to figure out how to keep fabric stretched evenly tho might be a headache.

I think wood glue might soak into cloth and look bad.

I like the wallpaper glue idea because you can manipulate the fabric to get an even stretch.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115202 posts in 3038 days


#6 posted 12-12-2015 03:19 PM

View Clint Searl's profile

Clint Searl

1533 posts in 1822 days


#7 posted 12-16-2015 02:17 AM

I ended up using a waterborne floor finish (Bona Mega), first brushed heavily on the acrylic ground coat, with the fabric laid into it, followed by brushing a copious amount on the fabric to saturate it. The challenge was to brush out the fabric to eliminate wrinkles and bubbles before the finish dried too much. There are some small wrinkles now frozen in the cured finish. Now to give it more clear topcoats .

Thanks for the suggestions.

-- Clint Searl....Ya can no more do what ya don't know how than ya can git back from where ya ain't been

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4024 posts in 1812 days


#8 posted 12-16-2015 04:32 AM

The challenge was to brush out the fabric to eliminate wrinkles and bubbles before the finish dried too much. There are some small wrinkles now frozen in the cured finish.

Perhaps using a small squeegee like they use in fiberglass layup would have helped. Your technique sounds very similar.

-- Bondo Gaposis

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com