LumberJocks

Someone Please Help!

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by brose1313 posted 12-07-2015 02:43 AM 702 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View brose1313's profile

brose1313

5 posts in 370 days


12-07-2015 02:43 AM

Hello All – First post with my new account, for some reason I wasn’t able to get into my old account. So I purchased a jointer and bandsaw from a local guy on craiglist this past friday, everything is great with the bandsas but I just ran into a major problem with the jointer. The guy assured me that the jointer was one phase which was confirmed by the nameplate on the side of the jointer. I just took the panels off to begin the process of detaching the base from the wings so I can get this monster downstairs and noticed that the motor says that it is three phased:...Is there a way that the jointer is running 1 phase even though the motor says three phase??? I would really like to get this sorted out before I bring this 500+ LB monster down to my basement shop….Any help would be truly appreciated


13 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4247 posts in 1666 days


#1 posted 12-07-2015 03:02 AM

That is in fact a 3 phase motor, as indicated on the motor data plate. Will it run on single phase as-is? I doubt it, but you never know what a PO may have done. Open up the starter and see what is in there and how it’s wired, both from the power source and to the motor.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

1646 posts in 1784 days


#2 posted 12-07-2015 03:10 AM

The motor is 3-phase. You may wish to check inside the electric box to see if there is a phase converter or vfd inside. It’s unlikely though. The seller probably assumed single phase from the tag on the machine and was never running it on single phase.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

View DylanC's profile

DylanC

196 posts in 2142 days


#3 posted 12-07-2015 03:11 AM

Looks like 1.5 hp…new motor or small VFD and you’re back in business.

-- Dylan C ...Seems like all ever I make is sawdust...

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4247 posts in 1666 days


#4 posted 12-07-2015 03:14 AM

The seller probably assumed single phase from the tag on the machine and was never running it on single phase.

OWWM Rule #1 is at the top for a reason!!!

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View ThomasChippendale's profile

ThomasChippendale

244 posts in 400 days


#5 posted 12-07-2015 03:35 AM

3 phase will not operate on single phase, ask the seller for a single phase motor of equal HP.

-- PJ

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4247 posts in 1666 days


#6 posted 12-07-2015 03:38 AM


3 phase will not operate on single phase, ask the seller for a single phase motor of equal HP.

- ThomasChippendale

Shhhhhh….. don’t tell my 3-phase table saw that :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View brose1313's profile

brose1313

5 posts in 370 days


#7 posted 12-07-2015 05:12 PM

Thanks everyone for the responses! Does anyone have an experience using a vfd device?

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4247 posts in 1666 days


#8 posted 12-07-2015 05:17 PM


Thanks everyone for the responses! Does anyone have an experience using a vfd device?

- brose1313

Lots of folks around here do… what do you want to know? They are pretty simple devices… it takes the 240V single phase supply you have in your home/shop and provides 3-phase output to the motor. It also gives you all sorts of benefits over and above what you can get with a single phase motor – and the soft start (programmable start time) and variable speed is great for use on a lathe – some may not be all that important for a jointer though.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View brose1313's profile

brose1313

5 posts in 370 days


#9 posted 12-07-2015 05:59 PM

Few questions

1.) Does the the VFD take the place of the plug or does the VFD supply power to the plug which you then plug the machine into?

2.) My 220v setup is currently running to two outlets using a junction box. Would I be able to setup just one of the outlets using the VFD for three phase or would this also affect the other 220v outlet as well.

3.) Is it complicated to setup the VFD?

4.) What are the downfalls of using a VFD for three phase conversion?

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4247 posts in 1666 days


#10 posted 12-07-2015 06:08 PM

The VFD replaces the starter on your machine (it’s no longer needed). You attach the power plug for 240v input to the VFD and the other end gets plugged into the wall outlet (or however you want to attach to the supply).

Doesn’t matter how your 240v supply is currently setup – a single plug, multiple plugs, hardwired, whatever… you are just supplying 240v single phase to the VFD – it doesn’t care where it comes from (as long as it has enough current and the wires are appropriately sized). It would be identical to what you would do with a single phase 240v machine in every aspect. It’s not until the juice hits the VFD that it gets converted to three phase.

It is not complicated.. in fact, you could probably just wire it up and never touch any VFD settings (just use the defaults and control the unit via the front panel). Only exception is the default Hz might be 50 instead of 60, but that is pretty easy to change. Al that is required is 2 wires + ground in, 3 wires + ground out (to motor).

No downfalls that I know of, and in fact, you gain a lot of features that you won’t get otherwise.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: Another option would be to use a static phase converter.. it might be a bit cheaper, but you won’t get any of the benefits of the VFD and it will reduce your motors power by about 1/3. It just sits between the wall and your machine, so the machine just sees 3 phase as if that was what was coming from the wall. Lot’s of people still like them though!

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View brose1313's profile

brose1313

5 posts in 370 days


#11 posted 12-07-2015 06:19 PM

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4247 posts in 1666 days


#12 posted 12-07-2015 07:48 PM

Would this work?

I’m sure it would… and there are many people who have used similar no-name chinese brands successfully, although if something should go wrong, it prove defective, or you have questions specific to the unit, you generally don’t have anyone to turn to or any recourse other than finding another one. It’s entirely up to you and what you feel comfortable with.

The TECO (Westinghouse) FM50 is probably the most widely used model at the low end of the price spectrum, and can be obtained from reputable US suppliers who will support the product, and there isn’t too much of a price difference. Places like factorymation and dealerelectric to name a couple.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View brose1313's profile

brose1313

5 posts in 370 days


#13 posted 12-09-2015 04:55 PM

This without a doubt looks much cheaper than going down the route of installing a 1 phase motor. This cuts out the need for installing a new outlet to fit the plug ($25) and I wasn’t sure if I need to get buy a new start/stop button for the machine if I bought a new 1 phase grizzly motor.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com