LumberJocks

Wood Prices

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by mski posted 11-01-2007 06:45 PM 1566 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View mski's profile

mski

439 posts in 3980 days


11-01-2007 06:45 PM

Hi,
I went to my local wood dealer th price some hard maple, pauk and purple heart,
It seems evertime I go in there the price changes, last time the 8\4 maple was $8.75 BF, this time it was $6.75,
Does anyone know if wood prices fluctuate with the market.
I was afraid to ask them,

-- MARK IN BOB, So. CAL


17 replies so far

View Thos. Angle's profile

Thos. Angle

4444 posts in 3962 days


#1 posted 11-02-2007 02:44 AM

yep

-- Thos. Angle, Jordan Valley, Oregon

View Peter Oxley's profile

Peter Oxley

1426 posts in 3874 days


#2 posted 11-02-2007 05:47 AM

They change all the time. Seasons, weather, shipping, demand … all kinds of things affect the price. You might want to grab some extra maple while the price is down!

-- http://www.peteroxley.com/woodworking -- http://north40studios.etsy.com --

View GaryK's profile

GaryK

10262 posts in 3988 days


#3 posted 11-02-2007 05:59 AM

So. Cal? Where are you looking at? Reel Lumber, Lane Stanton Vance?

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

View mski's profile

mski

439 posts in 3980 days


#4 posted 11-02-2007 02:17 PM

Myan Hardwood in Oxnard.
Yea I thought that was a good price, I got a 8/4 X7” X7’ piece for our cutting board projects, I started looking at it and abut half the board is birdseye, so maybe I’ll get another piece for the cutting boards and maybe some for later, Maple is my favorite wood, sick of looking at Red Oak everthing out on the West Coast is Red Oak
The Paduk was $7.43 BF 4/4
Thanks

-- MARK IN BOB, So. CAL

View Mark Mazzo's profile

Mark Mazzo

352 posts in 3912 days


#5 posted 11-02-2007 03:14 PM

In short, price is usually governed by supply, demand and what they paid to obtain the stock in the first place. For example, because of shipping costs etc., exotic stock is always more expensive. The same is true for domestic species in one part of the US that are not grown there locally. The market forces for hardwood lumber are not unlike other non-mass produced products.

-- Mark, Webster New York, Visit my website at http://thecraftsmanspath.com

View markrules's profile

markrules

146 posts in 4115 days


#6 posted 11-02-2007 04:00 PM

All the rain this year in Texas meant that the forestry equipment had a difficult time getting into the woods to bring product out. The result? higher lumber and plywood prices until things dried out a bit.

View dalec's profile

dalec

612 posts in 3888 days


#7 posted 11-02-2007 04:25 PM

I have begun to look hardwoods for a cutting board project. It’s not that much large a project that costs for the wood will affect the total cost of the project all that much, but if I were to plan ahead toward larger projects, taking advantage of seasonal drop in prices for certain hardwood may cause me to consider certain hardwoods or timing a of a project.

Peter mentioned that the price of hardwoods vary with supply and demand, seasons etc.

Is there a better time of the year to purchase certain types of hardwoods domestic or exotics from a pricing perspective or is it hit or miss?

Dalec

View mski's profile

mski

439 posts in 3980 days


#8 posted 11-10-2007 01:24 AM

Hey GaryK,
Glad you mentioned Lane Stanton Vance, I checked and there is a store 1/4 mile from Myan Hardwoods, I went in they have alot of specials , shorts ect and I talked to the salesman and said he would beat Myan, I got some competion going, only trouble is I bought a 8/4 X 3.5” X 125” Purpleheart, @$6.75 BF ,he charged for 7BF, I get 6 BF by my calculations, I’ll go in tomorrow and check his mathematical ability,
Anyway thanks for bringing them up, they really have a nice selection.

-- MARK IN BOB, So. CAL

View Karson's profile

Karson

35121 posts in 4400 days


#9 posted 11-10-2007 02:45 AM

I agree 6.07 Bd Ft of lumber.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware soon moving to Virginia karsonwm@gmail.com †

View mski's profile

mski

439 posts in 3980 days


#10 posted 11-10-2007 03:05 AM

Yea not being picky but that turns it into $7.78 a BF, what if I bought 40 BF? maybe thats how he beats the competitors price, I’m going back tomorrow for the math test , I’ll let ya know what happens, maybe just an honest mistake, or maybe a trick of the trade, (like car salesmen!!) I hate going into stores and there are no prices on the products ,or price lists, like NAPA AUTO PARTS, Ect.

-- MARK IN BOB, So. CAL

View dalec's profile

dalec

612 posts in 3888 days


#11 posted 11-10-2007 05:34 PM

Thanks for bringing up the calculation of BF. It has been long long time since I had any need to calculate BF and at that time it had little practical meaning for a teenager.

Anyway, reading this thread got me working with the formula and I have to say I finally really got it.

Thanks Mark for the problem and Karson for the correct BF calculation.

Dalec

View Rob McCune's profile

Rob McCune

123 posts in 4098 days


#12 posted 11-10-2007 05:44 PM

(Length in inches X width in inches X thickness in inches)/144 + 15% gratutity (added automatically)/IQ of the guy cutting the wood for you = ask for some vasoline next time.

-- Rob McCune

View dennis mitchell's profile

dennis mitchell

3994 posts in 4314 days


#13 posted 11-10-2007 07:07 PM

I’ve always seen them round up to a the full inch.

View Peter Oxley's profile

Peter Oxley

1426 posts in 3874 days


#14 posted 11-10-2007 08:44 PM

If you do (length in feet X width in feet X thickness in inches) you don’t have to do the division at the end. I can’t divide by 144 in my head. I’ve noticed when I’m buying a stack of lumber, they always let me pay for the gaps between the boards.

To the original topic – I asked my favorite salesman about price shifts. He told me that it was pretty dependent on what was popular at the time. Maple was pretty big a couple of years ago, but it’s less popular now, so the price is down a bit. He said the only wood that has a really strong seasonal cycle is Alder. Alder will be most expensive in winter and early spring. And it’s popular right now, too!

-- http://www.peteroxley.com/woodworking -- http://north40studios.etsy.com --

View dalec's profile

dalec

612 posts in 3888 days


#15 posted 11-10-2007 09:42 PM

Thanks Peter

Dalec

showing 1 through 15 of 17 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com