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Cheeseboard Legs

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Forum topic by DonBoston posted 12-05-2015 10:57 PM 564 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DonBoston

75 posts in 922 days


12-05-2015 10:57 PM

So, I’ve had a request to do a custom black walnut cheeseboard for a customer, but I’m not really sure what the best way to attach the stands. The board is 2” thick, and will be finished with mineral oil/beeswax combo.

How would you attach these legs?

-- Don Boston RECreations by Don http://recreationsbydon.com


11 replies so far

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Jenine

144 posts in 1183 days


#1 posted 12-05-2015 11:12 PM

I’m going with the obvious answer here: glue.

Is there a reason you don’t want to glue them on?

-- - Montana sucks. Tell your friends.

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DonBoston

75 posts in 922 days


#2 posted 12-05-2015 11:13 PM

hah, well ya… That was my first thought as well, but then I started wondering about dowels, or screw in anchors for added strength.

Plus it’s end grain legs gluing to side grain board. I’ve never had great success with end grain gluing.

-- Don Boston RECreations by Don http://recreationsbydon.com

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ShawnSpencer

81 posts in 1001 days


#3 posted 12-05-2015 11:31 PM

I’d go dowels but, screws are just as good.

-- I know you know...

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bondogaposis

4020 posts in 1811 days


#4 posted 12-05-2015 11:43 PM

Dowels and glue.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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Jenine

144 posts in 1183 days


#5 posted 12-05-2015 11:44 PM

Well, the entire board is glued together….so if glue isn’t strong enough, then you would have bigger problems than just the legs falling off. :)

I’ve used glue to attach cutting board legs. The only issue I had was with the first one I did and one leg slipped out of position when the clamps were on. Now I make sure I hold them in place for a full minute before clamping so they don’t move.

I also use clear epoxy to finish the bottoms of the feet to prevent moisture from wicking up from the counter and ruining my feet.

-- - Montana sucks. Tell your friends.

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paratrooper34

891 posts in 2412 days


#6 posted 12-06-2015 02:16 AM

I am guessing it is too late now, but a tenon on the feet and a mortice on the cutting board would be how I would have done it.

Jenine, the entire board IS glued together, but that is long grain to long grain orientation as it should be. You cannot glue end grain to long or end grain, which is how the feet are oriented here, it doesn’t work. Gluing lesson #1.

-- Mike

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becikeja

643 posts in 2273 days


#7 posted 12-06-2015 12:31 PM


You cannot glue end grain to long or end grain, which is how the feet are oriented here, it doesn t work. Gluing lesson #1.

- paratrooper34

Paratrooper this is my thought as well, but then how do you explain that many cutting board designs require that you glue end grain to end grain and they hold up just fine. See post: http://lumberjocks.com/topics/132306 This is puzzling to me, any thoughts?

-- Don't outsmart your common sense

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paratrooper34

891 posts in 2412 days


#8 posted 12-06-2015 01:05 PM

How do I explain it? Centuries of woodworking practices that dictate avoidance of end grain gluing is good enough for me. Can you provide a book or other type of source where someone advocates for gluing end grain joints? I would like to see it if so.

-- Mike

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Tennessee

2410 posts in 1974 days


#9 posted 12-06-2015 01:36 PM

I’d be hard pressed to end grain glue those.
I’d drill a hole through the leg, countersink the bottom, and attach it with a long screw. Pretty much how most factories do it, about one inch into the main board.

Dowels are OK with glue, but they can and do snap.

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

View johnstoneb's profile

johnstoneb

2143 posts in 1632 days


#10 posted 12-06-2015 02:23 PM

Lighten up Top.
End grain can be glued up. It is not the strongest glue joint but it can be done successfully.
In your application I would use dowels or if you have the wood cut new legs and go with a mortise and tenon. I think there is to much potential of moisture for screws in this application.
I would use at least a 1/2” dowel if possible.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

View DonBoston's profile

DonBoston

75 posts in 922 days


#11 posted 12-06-2015 02:36 PM

Thanks y’all, I have decided to go with dowels at this point, and will do 1/2” as suggested by Bruce.

(didn’t mean for this to turn into a an end grain gluing debate, but hey, it’s the internet so…)

-- Don Boston RECreations by Don http://recreationsbydon.com

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