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Forum topic by Jeff82780 posted 12-04-2015 03:07 AM 727 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jeff82780

204 posts in 2455 days


12-04-2015 03:07 AM

Topic tags/keywords: t

Trying to resaw some 8/4 red oak for a bow arm morris chair and am I failing miserably. The problem I am having is the top is about a 1/16th if an inch off from the bottom. I set my drift angle. Bought a new wood slicer blade. Then I checked the blade for square. Left side of blade square. Then I checked the right side of the blade and it wasn’t square. How is this possible? Am I missing something? Thanks!


13 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4208 posts in 1660 days


#1 posted 12-04-2015 03:18 AM

I set my drift angle. Bought a new wood slicer blade. Then I checked the blade for square. Left side of blade square. Then I checked the right side of the blade and it wasn t square. How is this possible?

It’s not… unless your table is in really bad shape (or your square is)! Fortunately, you don’t need a square to verify that it’s perpendicular to the table.

But since you said “set my drift angle”, I’m guessing you don’t have your saw set up very well…
Here is the obligatory band saw set up video – watch it, try it, then get back to us :)

Band Saw Clinic with Alex Snodgrass

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2190 posts in 942 days


#2 posted 12-04-2015 01:05 PM

Jeff – If its a stamped metal table, it may have been damaged. Other possibility would be table mounting bracket is bent. I would check it with winding sticks. Even if you can’t fix that, the most important side is left side this is where you’re wood will be.

After checking blade parallel to table, you need to check blade parallel to fence. You might be surprised to find your fence is not perp to table.

The set up has to be meticulous. I look at the following for resawing:

1. Properly tensioned blade (don’t go by the saws tension gauge get that sucker tight).
2. Resawing fence. I use my stock fence but if tall, thin wood, you can easily make a tall fence.
3. Blade perp to table.
4. All guides adjusted properly.
5. Feed rate – go slow and steady rate of feed.
6. A bandsaw suited to resawing. You need power and capacity.
7. Last but not least the correct blade.

The whole drift angle thing seems to foster some debate. The manual on every bandsaw I’ve ever owned shows how to adjust for drift, and just about every video on bandsaw tuning also. Setting your fence for drift angle and blade tension is probably the #1 factor affecting resaw cut. It is very simple just take any board and make cut on a line parallel to one edge. About 1/2 way through the cut stop and align the fence to the parallel edge.

I’ve watched the video and Mr. Snodgrass has a good clinic for sure but I totally disagree with his notion there is no such than as drift. Every bandsaw I’ve ever owned (4) has had drift no matter where the blade is tracked. Maybe it has something to do with the tires, the alignment, or a PM bandsaw but I’ve never had any success with his “ride the gullet” technique.

I wonder how critical the blade guides are (at least the lateral ones). In one of his bandsaw videos, Mattias Wandell made test cuts with his homemade bandsaw without any blade guides whatsoever. Amazing how well it cut.

Even after you get everything set up you will find different woods resaw differently, even from board to board, so don’t get frustrated. One cut will be perfect and the next not-so-perfect. You have to stay super focused on the cut. I would start with some 2×6 spruce or soft pine and practice a bit. Just messing around a while back, I was cutting 1/64” veneer in QSWO. Showed it to my wife she said, “Oh so you’re finally going to reveneer my antique sewing machine cabinet, yippee!!”.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View ThomasChippendale's profile

ThomasChippendale

244 posts in 393 days


#3 posted 12-04-2015 01:23 PM

It is impossible that the left and right side of the blade be at different angles to the table, your throat plate may be raising your square on one side ou your square is not 90degrees and your blade is in fact tilted to one side.

-- PJ

View SirIrb's profile

SirIrb

1239 posts in 692 days


#4 posted 12-04-2015 01:26 PM

Just a thought:
Make a 3/4 ply top to put over the stock BS table. Bolt onto it a tall resaw fence. This way you know that the table is flat and the fence is 90 to the table. All you have to do then is square the net top using the stock top to the blade.

Be careful in attaching the 3/4 ply top to the table as the stock table sounds like it is not flat and you wouldnt want to tweak the new top. This may require shimming one side of the 3/4 ply pre squaring.

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

View Jeff82780's profile

Jeff82780

204 posts in 2455 days


#5 posted 12-04-2015 06:19 PM

Thanks for all the replies. Watched snodgrass video. Table is cast iron so I’m hoping it’s flat. At work now so I can’t check until later. Fence is square. Still having problems. I’ll mess with it later. Maybe reset my drift angle

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4208 posts in 1660 days


#6 posted 12-04-2015 07:32 PM

The whole drift angle thing seems to foster some debate. The manual on every bandsaw I ve ever owned shows how to adjust for drift, and just about every video on bandsaw tuning also. Setting your fence for drift angle and blade tension is probably the #1 factor affecting resaw cut.

Hmmmm… the manual for my Delta doesn’t make any mention about ‘correcting’ for drift :)

And as shown in the Snodgrass video, he deliberately puts his fence out of whack and still gets a perfect re-saw! Once I figured out how to properly setup the machine, I’ve never had a problem… setting the blade so the back of the gullets ride the crown is the first step, then small tweaks forward or backwards with the tracking removes any remaining drift issues (if there is any). Of course, YMMV!

Cheers,
Brad

PS: If your blade is dull, or otherwise damaged, then all bets are off!

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View drcodfish's profile

drcodfish

119 posts in 413 days


#7 posted 12-04-2015 08:22 PM

Did you buy your saw new? If so, didn’t it come with set up instructions? I bought an old, (1990’s) 17 inch Grizzly, and the blade drifted over into the next room when I first used it. I went on the Grizzly web site and fortunately they still had the manual in their ‘virtual’ catalogue. I down loaded that, went through the set up instructions which were quite thorough, BOUGHT A NEW BLADE and now it works like a pro saw.

When all else fails, read the instructions. And, ... watch your fingers!

-- Dr C

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

2410 posts in 1975 days


#8 posted 12-04-2015 08:57 PM

I’m with Brad on this one – the majority of drift comes with blades that are not sharp enough, or also not tensioned enough.

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

View Jeff82780's profile

Jeff82780

204 posts in 2455 days


#9 posted 12-05-2015 12:30 AM

Just purchased wood slicer couple days ago. So it’s sharp. I have a rigid bandsaw that is ok. I think it can handle the 8/4 oak stock. At times it’s cutting like butter, then it will bind up on me making it difficult to push through.

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

3656 posts in 1726 days


#10 posted 12-05-2015 03:49 AM

Jeff I’ve had the same problems with my bandsaw and resawing. I’ve tried everything. The first several cuts with a woodslicer were great. I’m still struggling and looking forward to hearing some great advice on your thread here. thanks.

View Jeff82780's profile

Jeff82780

204 posts in 2455 days


#11 posted 12-05-2015 04:34 PM

Attempted my resaw again this morning and things went better. Still takes a super long time to cut through, but at least it sawed straight. All I did was tighten the blade super tight. My saw is prolly just under powered that why the it’s cuts so slow. THANKS For All The replies!

View martyoc's profile

martyoc

26 posts in 378 days


#12 posted 12-05-2015 07:45 PM

Jeff, the advice from rwe2156 is excellent but I’d also suggest you look at he piece you are trying to resaw. The face going against the fence needs to be flat and the edge riding on the table needs to be perpendicular to it, and both should be fairly smooth. Also, when you finish a resaw cut, clear the table and the bandsaw blade slot from chips before making the next cut. Keep a moderate pressure applied to the piece to keep it against the fence and apply the pressure in the vicinity of the blade. If you are making many resaw cuts, recheck the squareness of the blade to the table periodically. I’m not sure what you consider a fast cut, but a bandsaw does cut as fast as a table saw, so be patient.

I am about finished making a set of six dining chairs the have several curved laminated pieces of walnut for the sides, rails, back pieces and all, and each chair require about 60 resawed pieces to make them, most three to five inches in height. I used Highland’s wood slicer blade, one that I’ve had in use for several years. My bandsaw is an early 1970’s Delta with a 1/2 HP motor, and had no problem with power or feed rate. So, be patient, you’ll do all right.

-- Marty O'C

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DocSavage45

7698 posts in 2303 days


#13 posted 12-12-2015 01:03 AM

Jeff,

I’m making another forum post to get feedback on rate of feed, type of blade, ad smoothness of cut.

That said, is the 8/4 oak quarter sawn? If so there should be no difference in rate of speed during the cut. Otherwise I’ve noticed differences in rate and speed for figured wood. The square may not be square. The bade tension on a new blade varies, and needs readjusting. Learned that one the hard way.

At times I’ve overlooked a detail and had that “oh dah!” moment.

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

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