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Transporting a PM66

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Forum topic by scvwood27 posted 12-04-2015 02:00 AM 717 views 1 time favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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scvwood27

117 posts in 1417 days


12-04-2015 02:00 AM

I need to transport a PM66 with a 50” rail about 150 miles on a trailer. Looking for some tips and advise to make the trip with minimal damage to the saw. Years ago I transported a contractor saw on a trailer and the bouncing of the motor bent the motor mount plate. Trying to avoid any damage if possible.
Please help.


12 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4234 posts in 1665 days


#1 posted 12-04-2015 02:31 AM

You can easily block the motor up with some 2X material to keep it from bouncing. If it were me, I’d remove the fence, rails, extension wings/tables and blade first, then I would raise the motor all the way up, tilt it to full 45 (puts the motor in the center of the cabinet), put down a packing blanket or other suitable padding, flip it over on the table and block the motor up with it in that position. Done it a few times in the back of a pick-up without any incident, and a trailer would be nice but not required. Be sure to strap down with appropriate tie-downs to keep from moving.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: Even if you transport upright, I’d remove the fence/rails and wings to help reduce the top-heaviness. And whatever you do, don’t strap across the fence or wings with the tie-downs.

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View rayrobertson's profile

rayrobertson

16 posts in 2374 days


#2 posted 12-04-2015 03:26 AM

I agree with everything MrUnix said. I would just add, that with any machine I try to move or load, I try to take all the handles and handwheels off that I can. Usually just takes a screw driver or an allen wrench, and you never know when one of those things is going to want grab a strap or something. Keeps things from getting bent or broke, even if it falls over while loading or unloading you may minimize the damage.

-- Ray, http://ozarktoolmanuals.com/ http://ozarkwoodworker.com/

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3947 posts in 1959 days


#3 posted 12-04-2015 12:12 PM

Yeah, Brad detailed the approach I would use as well. I recently sold my Unisaw and that was the way the buyer got it into his truck (flip onto table), makes the whole process easier.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View SirIrb's profile

SirIrb

1239 posts in 697 days


#4 posted 12-04-2015 12:56 PM

the rails are easy to remove. If I remember correct it is a few 1/4-20 bolts. May take a #3 phillips in case.

Remove the wings. They should be something like 3/8 bolts.

Pull the motor. Have a friend. If it is similar to a Baldor 3hp then it will be darn near 70+lbs.

Also, and this is just me, I carry a roll of stretch wrap in my truck at all times in case I find a machine I must have. This is good for two reasons. the first is obvious: you cant control the rain. The second is that just in case something is a bit loose it wont be on the road (hand wheel or something) the stretch wrap will keep it located in or on the saw.

Steve
Who is always looking for a machine on the side of the road that needs love.

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

View scvwood27's profile

scvwood27

117 posts in 1417 days


#5 posted 12-09-2015 08:35 AM

How difficult is it to remove the motor and then later install it?

View SirIrb's profile

SirIrb

1239 posts in 697 days


#6 posted 12-09-2015 11:26 AM

It shouldnt be hard. I am not a PM pro. But if it is anything like my uni then you need a friend. My Baldor weighs something like 65 or 70 lbs.


How difficult is it to remove the motor and then later install it?

- scvwood27


-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4234 posts in 1665 days


#7 posted 12-09-2015 12:12 PM

Disconnect electrical, remove belts, then two bolts and it will slam to the ground, denting the cabinet, breaking stuff, and squishing your fingers/hands/arms or anything else in it’s way ;) Depending on the motor, it can be upwards of 80 pounds or so, and is in an awkward position to get to/remove when you are out in the field. Easier if you remove the table top so you can get to it from above.

It’s actually pretty easy if you are in the shop and have the right stuff to do it safely.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View scvwood27's profile

scvwood27

117 posts in 1417 days


#8 posted 12-09-2015 12:19 PM

How much room is there inside? Can I build a small stand and place it under so it doesn’t slam down?

View FancyShoes's profile

FancyShoes

509 posts in 830 days


#9 posted 12-09-2015 12:36 PM

With all the ones I have moved, if you have the help to man handle the whole piece together, Thatbis what I recommend. I have moved about 10, you dont save much weight taking it apart, and it isnt worth the time of taking apart and putting back together. 4 guys can pick up a tablesaw with extension table and put it in a truck. I like to rent a drop deck trailer to just roll them on to, and make sire you have straps going straight over the top to keep it from rocking. You can also run straps around to keep them from sliding forward and back. Put cardboard over the edges of the the table, I have had straps break because of the sharp edge.

i rent a drop deck for around $70. The drop deck lowers the deck to the ground, I rent from sunbelt rentals. Woodwhisperer did a video on moving his shop, and its the same trailer those guys use.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4234 posts in 1665 days


#10 posted 12-09-2015 12:45 PM

How much room is there inside? Can I build a small stand and place it under so it doesn’t slam down?

Easiest way is the ‘chair’ method… clamp a couple 2x’s to a chair so they extend into the cabinet through the motor opening and under the motor (raise motor all the way first). Then lower the motor so it’s resting on the wood, and make sure the chair has enough weight to keep from tipping (ie: sit on the thing or have someone hold it steady). Loosen the bolts and lower a bit more so the belts can be removed. Finish taking out the bolts and slide the motor back and out. You can then open up the motor wiring box and disconnect the wiring.

Honestly though, unless you absolutely need to remove the motor, I’d leave it in place and transport like described in the posts above at the top of this thread. The other stuff can be removed pretty easily to reduce weight. Even with the motor in place, it can easily be moved/loaded/transported by a single person. They aren’t really all that heavy, and I’ve loaded/transported by myself in the back of a pickup without any issues.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View scvwood27's profile

scvwood27

117 posts in 1417 days


#11 posted 12-09-2015 12:49 PM

Any issues with the motor bouncing during transport and causing damage to any parts?

View KellyB's profile

KellyB

77 posts in 648 days


#12 posted 12-09-2015 02:12 PM



Any issues with the motor bouncing during transport and causing damage to any parts?

- scvwood27

yabetcha!

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